Texture photography background

Texture photography background DEFAULT

Adding textures to photos is a fun way of creating new pictures. In some respects, it’s not very different to printing your photos onto textured paper or choosing frames for them (or both), except the images needn’t leave your computer. You can do this with photos you’ve already taken, though often it’s best to create them with this treatment in mind.

Adding textured backgrounds to photos

Cracked earth photo in the background.

Choosing your photos

You can add textures to almost any type of picture, but this method works well with simple photos where there isn’t a lot of fussy detail. Ideally, you need a sizeable single-tone area that allows the background to come through. Otherwise, you can use a simple texture with a complex photo – the important thing is that the two photos do not fight.

Adding textured backgrounds to photos

A harmless subject, despite appearances.

You can apply this treatment to portraits, landscapes, still lifes, or just about any genre. With still life, you’re at a particular advantage because you can take very simple pictures of subjects against plain backgrounds and then attempt to create something interesting later with a textured background.

Adding textured backgrounds to photos

Melding photos together is not a purist’s approach to photography, but you need only ask yourself one question: do you like the result? Adding a texture to a background is like putting two pieces of a jigsaw puzzle together. Do the two parts suit each other? A beneficial side effect of creating these pictures is that you’ll start noticing and shooting all kinds of textures to use with your photos.

Adding textured backgrounds to photos

Splodges of paint in the background.

Finding and photographing textures

You can create your own backgrounds quite easily by photographing textures around the home. For instance, try capturing textured paper, sandpaper, fences, walls, wood grain, baking trays, tiles, canvas, painted surfaces, rusting surfaces or concrete. Mid-tone textures with contrasting colors or details tend to work better than monotonous dark or bright surfaces.

Adding textured backgrounds to photos

Silhouetted trees against a blue painted background.

Try screwing up pieces of paper and then flattening them out for backgrounds. You can even use a scanner for paper backgrounds, which has the advantage of holding them flat while still recording the folds and creases.

Adding textured backgrounds to photos

The same silhouetted trees against brown paper. I wanted to avoid distracting contrast in the paper, so the processing holds off on highlights.

If you want to try this technique and don’t have any texture photographs in your library, you can always grab some to practice with from free photo websites (e.g. https://www.freeimages.com).

Adding textured backgrounds to photos

A French WW1 Croix de Guerre medal, originally shot against a white card background.

Another possibility is to use the in-built textures offered within image editing programs. Photoshop CC has this to a limited extent. There’s also a good textures section in ON1 Effects (standalone or filter plugin) that offers a lot of choice.

Adding textured backgrounds to photos

In Photoshop CC you can reveal the “Texture” filter under preferences. It only works on 8-bit images. This is the Canvas texture.

Photoshop Technique (or similar)

To blend textures into backgrounds, you need an editing program that has layers and blending modes. The second usually comes with the first. In brief, you just need to drag one photo on top of the other and adjust the blending mode between the layers to suit. Sometimes you might need to tweak opacity.

Here’s a more precise workflow:

  1. Open the two images you intend to merge (i.e. subject and textured background).
  2. Ensure that the texture image is the same size as the main photo or slightly larger. If it is much larger (e.g. a full-sized file layered onto a web image), it will appear less sharp.
  3. Using the move tool in Photoshop, drag the texture image onto the main photo. This automatically creates a second layer (“Layer 1”).
  4. Try the various layer blending modes in your layers palette until you find one that suits the image. “Overlay” is one that often works well.
  5. Adjust opacity to taste. If you want to strengthen the effect rather than fade it, you can duplicate Layer 1.
  6. Merge the layers (Ctrl + E) or Flatten Image.

You can do this the other way round and drag the main image onto the texture, but then the opacity slider becomes less useful. You ideally want to be able to fade the texture effect rather than the main photo. Also, if the texture file is larger, having that one on top avoids the need to crop the image afterwards.

Adding textured backgrounds to photos

Using the Brush Tool

Another thing you can do with your textures is to selectively paint parts of the effect out of or into the picture. You might do this if, for instance, you want to create the illusion that an object within the photo is resting on a textured background without being part of it.

Adding textured backgrounds to photos

Using a ON1 Effects texture I’ve created henna-type markings on the hand and used the brush tool to remove the same pattern from the watch.

To do this, you need to create a layer mask on “Layer 1” (your texture photo). Then, making sure the brush foreground color is black – visible in the tools palette – you use the brush tool at % opacity to selectively paint the texture out. Hitting “X” lets you paint detail back in again if you get clumsy.

Alternatively, you can do the opposite and create a black layer mask, painting texture into the picture with a white brush.

Harmony

I mentioned earlier choosing textures and photos that suit each other. So, what might that mean? Ultimately, you get to decide what goes well with what, but some textures intrinsically suit some subjects. For instance, old books generally go better with leather, paper or card textures than they do with a brick wall. Metallic objects might go well with rust or oxidation.

Adding textured backgrounds to photos

Another ON1 Effects texture (rice paper).

With human subjects, you might want to infer something else altogether, like cracks for old age or the passing of time. Be careful who you use that on! The bolder the texture is, generally the more limited it is in its potential. You can use paper and canvas textures on almost anything because of their photographic and artistic connection and their unobtrusiveness.

Express yourself

Any picture you produce on a computer rather than in camera will likely attract a degree of cynicism. That’s just the way photography is. But it’s not always healthy to be confined by your chosen craft and feel like you’re not doing anything new. Blending photos in Photoshop is creative, fun and even a little beneficial, since an eye for juxtaposition is a valid photographic skill.

Adding textured backgrounds to photos

Antique Vaseline pots against an old baking tray surface.

Get ready for the strange looks you’ll receive when you begin photographing plain walls and fences. Use a tripod for extra eccentricity ….

Feel free to share your creations in the comments section below.

Sours: https://digital-photography-school.com/how-to-use-textures-to-create-compelling-photographs/

Faking a High End Portrait Backdrop With Texture Overlays

Do you crave the look of a high-end, hand-painted portrait backdrop for your studio, but don't want to shell out the bucks for such a luxury? Why not grab your favorite roll of seamless paper and fake it ‘til you make it?

A Portable Solution

Before I had my own studio space, I worked mostly on location. My go-to setup for business portraits back then was a inch wide roll of gray seamless paper. I could set it up in a flash without an assistant, grab the shot I needed, and then later enhance that plain backdrop in Photoshop with a texture that would fool the eye of most anyone into thinking I had used a gorgeous, hand-painted canvas backdrop. I did this for years, and it resulted in many happy clients, both in business portraits and more mainstream studio work.

Splurging on the Real Thing

When I opened my photography studio after many years of borrowing space and shooting on-location, I celebrated having my very own spread by splurging on a high-end backdrop, hand-painted by one of the most talented backdrop painters in the business, the one-and-only Sarah Oliphant. Sarah is a legend in the backdrop world. Her backdrops have been featured in magazines like Vogue and Vanity Fair, and in the works of such world-famous photographers as Annie Leibovitz and Mark Seliger. Each one is truly a work of art.

The backdrop I commissioned from her is a gorgeous, double-sided, two-tone gray masterpiece, and I am super happy I took the plunge and bought it. It has totally taken the place of that plain gray seamless paper in my studio work. Having it set up permanently in my studio has reduced my workload both physically and in post-production.

However, there are many times when I want to shake things up by adding a little color to my portrait work, especially in senior portraits or commercial work. I love to use a red backdrop, as well as teal or deep blue. If I were super rich, I would ask Sarah to paint me one of each color. If I were flush with the luxury of time and painterly talent, I might try to paint my own. Alas, I have none of these luxuries, but what I do have is seamless paper, and Photoshop skills.

The Seamless Solution

Seamless paper backdrops are super easy to get, economical, and they come in every color under the sun. My go-to seamless brand, Savage Universal, even offers them in multiple widths of , 86, 53 or 26 inches. And while they can look great on their own, especially for a high-fashion look, sometimes they need a little added drama when they are being used for fine-art portraiture. Enter the texture overlay. Add one to an otherwise plain seamless backdrop, and you dramatically change the look and feel of your portrait. Throw in dramatic lighting and a timeless subject, and you can achieve an old-masters portrait feel without breaking the bank on a custom backdrop.

Texture overlays are super easy to create yourself. You can use your own photos of anything you see with interesting texture. I like to seek out things such as an interesting stonework, a grungy wall, a city sidewalk, chipping paint, or rusty metal. I’ve also created textures by photographing fabrics such as linen, burlap, or canvas. If you don’t want to create your own, you can buy textures for Photoshop (Etsy is an excellent resource for paid textures), or find free textures to download on sites like Deviantart or Brusheezy.

Adding Interest

In the following example, I wanted to add some painterly feel to an already dramatic portrait of one of my high school senior clients. I took a photo of the darker side of my Oliphant backdrop, but I wasn’t happy with the initial effect I got when incorporating it into my portrait.

The texture was a little lost in all the dramatic red. I decided to go back and enhance the texture of the backdrop in Adobe Camera Raw by increasing the clarity, lifting the whites, and deepening the blacks.

After doing initial skin and color edits in the photo that I wanted to place the texture in, I made a selection to isolate the red seamless background from my subject, and I copied and pasted the textured backdrop into the image in a separate layer. Finally, I changed the blending mode of that layer to “overlay”, and adjusted the opacity to my liking. The result is a beautifully textured, realistic looking backdrop for a fraction of the cost of a real, hand-painted canvas or muslin.

This method of adding texture is not just good for adding drama to your images. Sometimes your seamless paper needs a little cosmetic help to look better because of defects. Poor lighting, incorrect storage, and just everyday wear-and-tear can make your seamless look a little shabby. Sometimes you need to add a little something to disguise flaws such as ripples or creases. And sometimes your seamless paper just has a funky texture to it that you don’t want to see in your images. In these cases, adding texture can actually act as a correction instead of an enhancement.

A Quick Fix that Pays Off

Another great use for these texture overlays is for disguising your backdrop when it happens to be a plain wall. This can be especially useful on-location where you don’t have the time or capacity to carry a backdrop with you. In the following portrait, I had my subject stand against a pale gray wall in natural light, and I added texture to it in order to create interest and make it look more professional. For this texture, I took the same original photo of my gray backdrop, and changed the color of it using the Hue/Saturation adjustment layer to add sepia tone to it. I then enhanced the texture again using Adobe Camera Raw. This time, I experimented with different blend modes, finally settling on “darken”. The result is a soft, golden backdrop that complements my subject and raises the overall image to a different level.

As you can see, it’s simple to transform your portraits quickly and economically with the use of some experimentation and a little Photoshop magic.

If you’d like more information about Sarah Oliphant’s beautiful hand-painted backdrops, read this great article and visit her website here.

Sours: https://fstoppers.com/originals/faking-high-end-portrait-backdrop-texture-overlays
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Backgrounds and Textures

What are backgrounds and textures, and what is the difference between a background and a texture?

Both backgrounds and textures are used as part of the process of finishing a digital image towards the end of a workflow in Photoshop (or another design program). As such, they should be an important tool in the toolkit of every photographer or digital artist who uses Photoshop.

A background is an image file on which the primary image is placed to add interest and compositional completeness to a primary image file. Examples of background files that have been successful include canvas, exotic papers, and so on. Note that the image file is placed over the background, and that the background normally extends beyond the primary image.

In contrast to the background, which resides under the image, textures are placed over the image, and are therefore also called &#;texture overlays.&#; In conjunction with creative use of blending modes, texture files essentially become a kind of unique, one-off filter, enabling original and unique effects, and changing (and enhancing) the characteristics of many kinds of imagery.

 

Bamboo 2 by Harold Davis

Bamboo 2 © Harold Davis

What kinds of images are good candidates for &#;texturization&#;?

Harold Davis says, &#;When I am looking for a &#;straight&#; photographic effect I probably won&#;t be thinking about textures. Textures come into their own when the point of the image is to be partially &#;painterly&#;, in the most general sense of the term. I have successfully used textures with botanicals, landscapes, citiscapes, and even in figure studies.&#;

 

Where can I get backgrounds?

You can license image files that work as backgrounds from commercial stock photo agencies, and many of these are available royalty free.  But we&#;ve found that the best way to create a library of backgrounds is to scan interesting paper or fabric using an inexpensive flatbed desktop scanner, if possible opening the scan directly into Photoshop.

Some of the textures available as part of commercial texture packs will also work as backgrounds.

 

What are the commercial sources for textures?

The best commercial sources for texture packs that we&#;ve found are Flypaper Textures and Florabella.

 

Can I make my own textures?

Absolutely. Most texture files are shot with a DSLR using a fast shutter speed and/or a tripod for sharpness. Look for paper, fabric and walls that have interesting, well, textures. It&#;s easy to create your own library of textures, and lots of fun to play with them! The right textures can give your imagery an absolutely unique look.

 

How do I add an image to a background?

In Photoshop, size the background file so that it is a little larger than the image file in all dimensions. Make sure that the bit-depth and color profiles of the background and image files are the same. Center the image file as a layer on top of the background file. Adjust blending mode and opacity of the image file layer to suit.

One approach (or &#;recipe&#;) that we&#;ve found works well is to change the opacity of the image file layer to 15%. Next, duplicate the image file layer, and change the blending mode to Multiply and the opacity to 85%.

Be sure the flatten the layer stack before moving on to the next step in your workflow!

Venice of Cuba © Harold Davis

Venice of Cuba © Harold Davis

 

How do I texturize an image?

To add a texture to an image file, place the texture file over the image file in a Photoshop layer stack. (Before adding the texture layer, make sure that both files have the same bit-depth and color profile.)

With the texture a layer above the image in Photoshop, change the blending mode and opacity to get the effect you want. This may take quite a bit of experimentation. Don&#;t give up if a texture doesn&#;t seem too spectacular in Normal blending mode. Switching blending modes can produce very surprising results.

 

What is the relationship of a texture to blending modes, and which blending modes work best with textures?

The power of texturizing comes into its own when coupled with the use of Photoshop&#;s blending modes. But finding the right blending mode takes a good bit of trial and error. What blending mode will work well depends on the color values (and lights and darks) in both the texture and the image file.

Some of the blending modes that tend to be most successful with texture overlay files are Normal (at low opacity), Screen, Multiply, Overlay, Soft Light, and Difference.

Solace for the Wild Rest © Harold Davis

Solace for the Wild Rest © Harold Davis

 

Where can I learn more about backgrounds and textures?

If you are interested in a thorough course on backgrounds and and textures, please check out my online class Photoshop: Backgrounds and Textures. Click here to view my course on LinkedIn Learning and here to view my course on Lynda.com. There is a free preview. The full course is behind the paywall, but note that a free trial subscription is available for one month.

My Webinar recording about how to use Backgrounds & Textures is also available (about 65 minutes, $). Click here for the Webinar Recordings page, and here to learn more about our webinars.

When Dahlias Dream © Harold Davis

When Dahlias Dream © Harold Davis

Sours: https://www.digitalfieldguide.com/faqs/backgrounds-and-textures
How to Make Textured Background For Food Photography

DIY Textured Food Photography Backdrops

pinterest image for diy textured food photography backgrounds

This tutorial will take you through all the tips and tricks you need to make your own textured food photography backdrops! It’s so much cheaper and easier than you could imagine! This post contains affiliate links. If you click on a link and make a purchase, I receive a portion of the sale.

pinterest image for diy textured food photography backgrounds

This post goes out to all my food photographer friends!

I’ve had my eye on all those expensive food photography backdrops you can buy for years, but have never been able to justify the purchase. What if I don’t like it? What if it doesn’t match my style? What if I never use it??

Finally I decided to try my hand at making a few myself since I knew I could always re-do it if I didn’t like it and I wouldn’t be sinking a lot of money into something I might not like. Well, turns out I’m obsessed with making backdrops! Like, I would do this for fun and hang it on my wall like art because I think they’re so stinkin’ beautiful.

I am the least hardware-savvy person you’ll probably ever find, so don’t be intimidated by a trip to the hardware store. That is to say, you need to go to Home Depot, Lowes, or Menards, those are hardware stores, right?! A few supplies can be ordered off Amazon.

This tutorial will walk you through everything you need to purchase, and you can always ask someone who works there to help you find it. It’s going to be (relatively) cheap and easy, I swear!

Here’s what you’ll need for one double sided food photography backdrop:

The Wooden Board

What you get here is entirely up to you. I like to choose something about ½ inch thick that is smooth and sturdy, but light enough that I can pick it up and move it around without too much trouble. 

If I’m really planning ahead I will choose one that is about 2 feet x 4 feet and another that is 2 feet square. I will then give them the same paint job and use the smaller one as a standup background for straight on shots.

Joint Compound

I’ll be honest, I don’t even know what this stuff is. I found it near the paint by the stains and stuff to patch walls. What I like about the stuff in the photo is that it goes on pink and dries white, so you know when it’s ready for the colored paint!

joint compound on a blue board

Joint Knife

Obviously, my joint knife is not super well cared for. Doesn’t matter! The rougher the better on this project. I just like the large, flat surface for spreading the joint compound.

Paint Sample Pots

Choosing your paint colors is probably the hardest part of all of this. I selected a few inspiration photos ahead of time and used them to compare to swatches in the store. 

Try to choose colors. There should be colors per side of your board.

For each side you’ll want colors that are within the same shade (light, medium, and dark or white, medium, and dark). Take into consideration the type of food you will be photographing and consult a color wheel if necessary to see what colors work together.

two sample paint pots on a white board

Choose the flattest paint possible (not shiny), my store only carried Eggshell paint samples, which is fine, but Matte (or Flat) would be even better.

The colors I chose for this project were ones I had sitting around from other boards I made. There was a steely blue and a light gray, and I also used some white.

Kitchen Sponge

Seriously, choose the cheapest package of simple, rectangular sponges. 

Sponge Brush

This also doesn’t need to be fancy, just your basic sponge brush. Bristles won’t work here.

How to Make Textured Food Photography Backgrounds

Clean Your Board

This doesn’t need to be a deep clean, just make sure it’s clear of any debris. If you purchased a rougher board, you may want to sand it and remove any dust from that.

The board I was painting was one I had tried to paint using another style, and… it obviously didn’t work out. Good thing we’re doing this instead!

a blue painted wood board

Apply the Joint Compound

a large putty knife applying joint compound to a blue board

You’ll want to use the joint knife to completely cover the board in joint compound, but here’s where a little skill and practice come into play. After covering an area in joint compound, run the joint knife gently over the surface in alternate arching motions. 

You want to create ripples and light lines that run in different directions to create movement and depth. If you don’t like how it looks, just keep trying different amounts of pressure and adding more joint compound if necessary.

Once you like the texture, allow the joint compound to dry completely. This could take several hours to overnight.

joint compound on a board

Apply the Paint

Once your joint compound is dry, pour several pools of each different paint on the board. Using the rectangular kitchen sponge, spread out the paint, mixing and swirling so that it isn’t just one color in any one space. 

paint swirls on a white board

You also don’t want to overmix because this would create one color as well. I like to use the sponge to spread out the colors, then dab it lightly to soften the look of the paint so it doesn’t have a “wiped” look

finished food photography backdrop

You could actually skip the joint compound and use the sponge to paint directly on the wood board, which you can see on the board in the photo below.

three bowls of cookie dough ice cream with sugar cones and chocolate chips

You could also be done at this point if you’re happy with how the board looks. I decided to go for a little more depth, because the texture in the joint compound is just too good to leave untouched!

Apply an Extra Layer of White

Once your paint layer is completely dry, use the sponge brush or another clean sponge to grab a little bit of white or your lighter color mixed with white. You want this to be a very small amount of paint. If you’re familiar with dry brushing, that’s what we’re going for!

Lightly brush this light colored paint across the texture of the joint compound. You want the light paint to be on top while the darker colors come through in the cracks underneath. You can make this as pronounced as you want or not. I decided to make one half of my large board more white and textured, and leave the other a little flatter.

finished painted food photography backdrop

Once this layer dries, you can move on to the next side! I know some people apply a matte finishing spray to protect the finished surface, but I’ve never had a problem wiping food and stains off my board.

I’ve also never been able to actually FIND matte finishing spray (because I seriously know nothing about hardware stores), so I think you’re ok with or without it!

How do homemade food photography backdrops look?

Homemade food photography backdrops help you stand out and define your style because they’re % unique. Here’s a photo taken with the background I was making in this tutorial.

vegan quinoa salad with balsamic tofu on a white plate with fork and napkin

And here’s another similar board I made in a different color scheme.

One of the great things about using colors all in one shade is that you can use Lightroom to alter the hue. For example, I could make the blue board super blue or completely greyed out. This is a good way to emphasize your food and coordinate colors with the food or your Instagram feed.

I hope this tutorial was helpful to you, if you have any questions or other favorite ways to make food photography backdrops let me know in the comments!

pinterest image for diy food photography backdrops
finished food photography backdrop

How to Make Textured Food Photography Backgrounds

How to DIY your own cheap and easy food photography backdrops!
Print Pin Rate
Total Time: 4hours45minutes
Servings: 1two sided board

Instructions

Clean Your Board

  • This doesn’t need to be a deep clean, just make sure it’s clear of any debris. If you purchased a rougher board, you may want to sand it and remove any dust from that.

Apply the Joint Compound

  • You’ll want to use the joint knife to completely cover the board in joint compound, but here’s where a little skill and practice come into play. After covering an area in joint compound, run the joint knife gently over the surface in alternate arching motions.
  • You want to create ripples and light lines that run in different directions to create movement and depth. If you don’t like how it looks, just keep trying different amounts of pressure and adding more joint compound if necessary.
  • Once you like the texture, allow the joint compound to dry completely. This could take several hours to overnight.

Apply the Paint

  • Once your joint compound is dry, pour several pools of each different paint on the board. Using the rectangular kitchen sponge, spread out the paint, mixing and swirling so that it isn’t just one color in any one space.
  • You also don’t want to overmix because this would create one color as well. I like to use the sponge to spread out the colors, then dab it lightly to soften the look of the paint so it doesn’t have a “wiped” look
  • You could actually skip the joint compound and use the sponge to paint directly on the wood board, which you can see on the board in the photo below.
  • You could also be done at this point if you’re happy with how the board looks. I decided to go for a little more depth, because the texture in the joint compound is just too good to leave untouched!

Apply an Extra Layer of White

  • Once your paint layer is completely dry, use the sponge brush or another clean sponge to grab a little bit of white or your lighter color mixed with white. You want this to be a very small amount of paint. If you’re familiar with dry brushing, that’s what we’re going for!
  • Lightly brush this light colored paint across the texture of the joint compound. You want the light paint to be on top while the darker colors come through in the cracks underneath. You can make this as pronounced as you want or not. I decided to make one half of my large board more white and textured, and leave the other a little flatter.
  • Once this layer dries, you can move on to the other side! I know some people apply a matte finishing spray to protect the surface, but I’ve never had a problem wiping food and stains off my board. I’ve also never been able to actually FIND matte finishing spray (because I seriously know nothing about hardware stores), so I think you’re ok with or without it!
Sours: https://theliveinkitchen.com/diy-textured-food-photography-backdrops/

Photography background texture

How To Add Texture Backgrounds To Your Photos

As once said by the famous photographer Ansel Adams, “you don’t take a photograph, you make it.” There’s an art form to capturing great images using photography, and the starting point begins before you even hit capture on your camera - but it doesn’t end with the capture button. To make a unique photograph, there’s a whole world of photo editing magic that can unlock your photo’s true potential and give it character. One of the simplest ways is to add texture backgrounds in the editing process.

If you’ve got a creative inclination to stray from the basic editing techniques and do something a little different with your photography, then texture backgrounds are for you! By adding texture to your photos, you can make a present day photo look historic, a digital photo look like it’s been scanned onto canvas, give it a vintage postcard feel, and add loads of depth that can’t be captured with your camera. With BeFunky’s huge collections of texture backgrounds, it’s really easy to let your creative side soar.

What Is A Texture Background?

A texture background in the photo editing process refers to the perceived feel, appearance, or consistency of the surface or subject. It’s essentially an image overlay of a textured surface, and when applied to your own image, adds a visual element that gives your photos depth and perceived feel. You can use them selectively to enhance certain parts of your photo and make flat surfaces look more 3D, or you can apply texture backgrounds to the entire photo, giving the appearance that it’s printed on canvas, paper, metal, and more!

how to create textured photos

One of the most common uses of texture backgrounds is to create a vintage aesthetic. With texture backgrounds, you can replicate the look of a historic photo by adding scratches and distress marks, manipulate the colors with a paint texture, and even make your photo look like it’s been scanned on antique paper. You can transform a solid-colored background into something more interesting by applying a more patterned texture. Whatever look you’re going for, BeFunky’s Textures library has a little something for everything!

When To Use Texture Backgrounds

Textures can enhance any type of photography, but they’re mostly used to create the look of a vintage or well-worn photograph. That means it’s best to start with photos that are a bit desaturated or chromatic in nature. With that in mind, here are the best types of photos to use with Textures:

Black and White Photography. Using Black and White effects on your photos can make them look moody and dated (in the best way!), but you can take it a step further with Textures like scratches to make them next-level vintage:

Adding textures to photos with BeFunky
photo editing with BeFunky

Portraits. If you want to make your next portrait look like a nostalgic work of art, a Paint texture background will take your photo to a whole new aesthetic level. No need to let the colors age for decades.

Textures-To-Photos-4
edit portrait photos with BeFunky

Buildings. Even a current photo of your cityscape can look like it was taken with a vintage camera when you add a distressing texture background like Grunge.  

how to distress photos with BeFunky
editing cityscape photos with BeFunky

Landscapes. Transform a landscape photo into a retro postcard by adding a Paper texture. Bonus points if you add a frame from the Frames tab.   

adding paper texture to photos with BeFunky
Textures-To-Photos-7

How To Enhance A Photo With Textures

Once you have the perfect photo in mind, upload it to the Photo Editor. From here, find the Textures section from your toolbar. This is where the real magic happens. In the Textures tab, you’ll notice several categories of textures you can use to manipulate your photo. From classic Canvas and Paper texture backgrounds, to more distressing textures like Scratches, Metal, and Grunge, you’ll find everything you need to create the look you’re going for. For this example, we’re going to add a few Scratches to this photo to make it look like it’s seen a few decades.

How to use textures in photo editing with BeFunky

Click on the Scratches category, and as you click on the options presented there, you’ll be able to preview each Texture on your entire photo. Notice that when you click on each Texture, you can access it’s Settings Menu (looks like a mixing board icon). When you click on the Settings Menu, you’re able to adjust the Opacity of the Texture, rotate it, and even adjust the Blend Mode for some really unique looks. Once you’ve got things looking perfectly distressed, click the blue checkmark to apply it. 

Textures-to-photosagain

For this particular photo, we went with Scratches 2. See the incredible distressed look we’ve created over the entire photo?

adding scratches to photos with BeFunky
how to edit photos with BeFunky

Using Texture Selectively 

Let’s say you just want to create a texture background in only part of your photo instead of applying a Texture to the entire thing. We’ve uploaded a new photo just for this example.

When you click on a Texture, it’s previewed as an overlay on top of the entire photo - but with BeFunky, you have total control over which parts of the photo you actually want to add texture. Preview the Textures until you find one you like for your background. Click on the Settings Menu and then click on Paint in the right corner to access Paint Mode.

Create a textured background in an image

With a simple click and drag of your mouse, you can easily erase the Texture from any area of the photo. This way, you can create a captivating textured background in just a few swipes of the paintbrush.

how to add texture to a background

For this photo, we went with Grunge 3 and erased all texture from the subject in the foreground. See how it makes the portrait pop? 

how to create textured background in photos
Textures-To-Photos

Ready to start adding unique Textures to your photos? With BeFunky, you can add a texture background to any photo in just a few clicks. Use them in combination with other effects in our Photo Editor or layer as many Textures as you want - the possibilities are literally endless.

Bring Photos to Life With Textures

Get Started Now


Sours: https://www.befunky.com/learn/texture-background/
How to Paint 3 Food and Product Photography Background Surfaces with No Texture

You have to buy something to work with. Valyukha has something of the instrument, left of her husband, but something was not. Yes, the material is needed. The transport problem was solved in an unexpected way.

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