D16 civic

D16 civic DEFAULT

Guide to tuning the D16 engine from Honda

"Thanks for reading our Honda D16 Tuning tips"

Tuning the Honda D16 and best D16 performance parts.

A good solid engine used in quite a few Civic and Integra models over the years, it makes a good project basis to work from.

With lower compression adding forced induction makes a big difference.

Sadly most other bolt on mods fail to make that much difference but it is still possible to increase power by another 20% or so, relatively cheaply.

We provide a guide to D16 tuning and report on the ultimate upgrades. Honda D16's have loads of potential and with a few sensible parts you can greatly increase your driving opportunities.

History, Power & Specs of the D16 Engine

D16A

  • 86–89 1.6 L D16A1 (Integra) DOHC
  • 86–89 1.6 L D16A3 (Integra) DOHC (Australia)
  • 88–91 1.6 L D16A6 (Civic) Si, (CRX) Si, (Civic) EX (South Africa)
  • 88–89 1.6 L D16A8 (Integra) DOHC
  • 88–89 1.6 L D16A9 (Integra) (CRX in Europe) DOHC (South Africa)

D16B

  • 98–01 D16B2 Honda Civic Aerodeck MC1 1.6i LS/ES/SR
  • 97–00 D16B2 Rover 416 Si Automatic
  • 98–00 D16B5 Honda Civic GX
  • 99- D16B6 1.6L Honda Accord (CG7/CH5, Europe)

D16Y

  • 92–95 1.6 L D16Y1 (Civic) Vti SOHC (Australia)
  • 96–00 1.6 L D16Y4 (Civic) İES NON VTEC(TURKEY)
  • 96–00 1.6 L D16Y5 (Civic) HX VTEC-E
  • 97–00 1.6 L D16Y7 (Civic) DX/LX/CX
  • 96–00 1.6 L D16Y8 (Civic) EX/(Canada)Si VTEC

D16Z

  • 90–92 1.6 L D16Z5 (Civic) (CRX in Europe) DOHC
  • 92–95 1.6 L D16Z6 (Civic) EX/Si, Del Sol Si VTEC
  • 98–06 1.6 L D16A (HR-V) J/J4
  • 98–06 1.6 L D16A (HR-V) JS/JS4 VTEC
  • 96–00 1.6 L D16Y8 (Civic) EX/(Canada)Si VTEC

Best D16A D16B D16Y D16Z parts

Just because a upgrades is popular with D16 owners it doesn't mean you should fit it, instead we will highlight only those upgrades that we reckon are the best and that will give your D16 the biggest power gain return for your cash.

Significant gains can be made from cam upgrades. Altering the cam profile alters the intake and exhaust durations on the engine and can dramatically change the power band and power output.

Fast road cams commonly boost the power through the rpm band, you could drop a little bottom end bhp but the high end rpm power will be lifted.

Competition cams, boost the high end rpm power band but as a result the car will not idle smoothly and low end power nearly always suffers.

If you have VTEC it is possible to get the VTEC to cut in at lower RPM ranges effectively giving you the sportier cam profile across more of the engines power band.

For a car driven daily you need to optimize your engines power to your driving style.

I'd be amazed if you have found a Motorsport and race camshaft is a pleasure to live with when on the daily commute, because the lumpy idle will make the car prone to stall and smooth driving at low rpm becomes impossible. If you are developing a track car this doesn't matter as you are in the high end of your RPM range anyway and that is where you want the power to be.

Each engine responds better to more aggressive cam durations than others.

The engine timing and fuel pump and injectors also have a large bearing on the power gains you'll get.

Extending exhaust or intake durations can alter the power band and on most engines the exhaust and intake durations do not need to match, although most cams and tuners use matched pairs there are some advantages to extending the intake or exhaust durations.

Typical stage 1 mods often include: Panel air filters, Sports exhaust manifold, Fast road camshaft, Intake headers, drilled & smoothed airbox, Remaps/piggy back ECU.

Typical stage 2 mods often include: induction kit, Fast road cam, fuel pump upgrades, high flow fuel injectors, Ported and polished head, Sports catalyst & performance exhaust.

Typical stage 3 mods often include: Competition cam, Engine balancing & blueprinting, Crank and Piston upgrades to alter compression, Internal engine upgrades (head flowing porting/bigger valves), Adding or Upgrading forced induction (turbo/supercharger), Twin charging conversions.

Remaps helps unlock the full potential of all the upgrades you've fitted to your D16 this is generally achieved with a piggy back ECU, Hondata is one of the most popular but it is quite expensive and there are other very good systems on the market..

(In some cases, as the factory ECU is locked flashing is not an option, so an aftermarket ECU is the route to take, and many of these will outperform factory ECU's but make sure it has knock protection and that you get it setup properly.)

It will usually give you around 15% on NASP engines with a few other mods, but you mileage will vary depending on the upgrades you've done and the condition of your engine.

Forcing more air into your D16 is the main goal to any engine modification job.

Headers carry the air from the air filter and allow it to be pulled into the engine and mixed with fuel.

The shape and flow characteristics of the Headers can make a large difference to to fuel engine efficiency on the D16.

I usually find intake headers are in dire need of a performance upgrade, although some car makers provide well optimised intake headers.

Big valve conversions on the D16, getting port work and head flowing will also increase torque, and significantly will allow you to get increasing the torque increase on other mods.

D16A D16B D16Y D16Z Turbo upgrades

The more air to get into an engine, the more fuel it can burn and uprating the induction with a turbocharger upgrade makes massive power gains.

NASP engines need quite a lot of work when you add a turbo, so we have a separate guide to help you take into account the pros and cons of going this route on your D16

It's not unheard of tuners spending a loads of money on turbocharger upgrades on the D16 only to watch the engine catastrophically fail when it's first rolling road session.

Bigger turbo chargers will usually experience no power at low rpm, and small turbo chargers spool up quickly but won't have the peak rpm power band gains.

the range of turbos is always moving on and we now see variable vane turbos, where the vane profile is altered according to speed to lower lag and increase top end bhp.

Twin scroll turbos divert the exhaust flow into two channels and flow these at differently designed vanes in the turbocharger. They also boost the scavenging effect of the engine.

You'll commonly see there's a restriction in the air flow sensor AFM/MAP on these engines when considerably more air is being drawn into the engine.

Going up you'll find 4 bar air sensors coping with quite large power gains, whereas the OEM air sensor was restricting power at a much lower level.

Adding a supercharger or additional turbo will make large bhp gains, although more difficult to get working.

Fuelling

You will need to ensure that the engine is not starved of fuel so will have to pay attention to the fuelling when you start extending past 20% of a power increase.We strongly recommend you to be generous with your injector capacity.

The accepted safe increase is to add another 20% when fitting an injector, this allows for injector deterioration and provides a bit of spare capacity should the engine require more fuel.

D16 Exhaust

You only need to to improve your exhaust if the existing exhaust is actually causing a restriction in flow.

On most factory exhausts you should find that the exhaust flow rate quite well even on modest power gains, but when you start pushing up the power levels you will need to get a better flowing exhaust.

Sports exhausts will certainly help air flow through the engine but avoid an exhaust that is too big or you might just stuff your flow rate and make things worse. So generally speaking, keep to a size of 1.5 to 2.5 inches for best results.

Typically exhaust restrictions can be located the catalyst installed, so adding a freer flowing sports alternative is the answer. This keeps the car road legal and will flow much better due to it's higher internal surface area and design, so has the added benefit of keeping your car road legal. The alternative decat should be considered an off road only mod, as removing a catalyst is illegal in most territories and regions for road registered cars..

Weakspots and problem areas on the D16

The D16 engines are generally reliable and solid units, as long as you follow the manufacturers service schedules, and use a good quality oil to ensure longevity. Few problems should happen as long as they are regularly serviced and maintained.

Carbon build up in the head, particularly around the valves which will sap power or create flat spots, this is a larger issue on direct injection engines but should be looked out for on all engines. We have tips on removing carbon build up.

Some of our members have had issues with flat spots or glitches after applying mods and upgrades or tuning, this is not usually related to this engines design, so instead see our article on diagnosing flat spots and problems after tuning which should help you get the bottom of this issue.

Regular oil changes are vital on the D16, especially when tuned and will help extend the life and reliability of the engine.

If you would like to know more, or just get some friendly advice on Tuning your Honda engine please join us in our friendly forumwhere you can discuss D16 tuning options in more detail with our D16 owners. It would also be worth reading our unbiased Honda tuning articles to get a full grasp of the benefits and drawbacks of each modification.

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Honda D16A (B, V, W, Y, Z) Engine Specs, Problems & Reliability

Modifications

1. D16A1 - the first engine, 16-valve DOHC head, 30 mm intake valves, 27 mm - exhaust, compression ratio is 9.3, the power of 115 hp. From 1988 the engine got new piston, the compression ratio was increased to 9.5 and power grown to 120 hp. The production began in 1986 for Acura Integra on the US market and stopped in 1989.
2. D16A3 - the D16A1 for Australian Acura Integra.
3. D16A6 - 16 valve engine with SOHC cylinder head, camshaft duration is 222/224 deg, 29 mm diameter of intake valve, exhaust -25 mm, 9.1 compression ratio, fuel nozzles are 235 cc, power is 107-110 hp. Production years are 1988-1996.
4. D16A7 - D16A6 without a catalytic converter, 9.6 compression ratio, the power is 119 hp. Production: 1988-1995.
5. D16A8 - 16 valve DOHC head, 9.5 compression ratio, the power is 120 hp. Production: 1988-1997.
6. D16A9 - analog of D16A8 without a catalytic converter, 126-130 hp. Production: 1988-1995.
7. D16B2 - 16 valve engine with SOHC head, 9.4 compression ratio, fuel nozzles is 190 cc, 115 hp. Production: 1997-2001.
8. D16B5 - SOHC 16 valve engine with 12.5:1 compression ratio. The engine has VTEC-E system. Its power is 106 hp. The D16B5 was being produced from 1988 to 1996.
9. D16B6 - 16 valve SOHC, 9.6 compression ratio, 114 hp. Produced only in 1999.
10. D16V1 - this engine was for European Civic model. Specs: 16 valves SOHC head, VTEC-E, 10.4 compression ratio, 109 hp. Production: 1999-2005.
11. D16W1 - 16 valve SOHC engine, 9.6 compression ratio. It makes 103 hp. Applications: 1999-2006 Honda HRV.
12. D16W3 - 16V SOHC, 10.4 compression ratio. Engine power is 116 hp. This modification was being produced since 1998 to 2001.
13. D16W4 - 16V SOHC, VTEC, 9.6 compression ratio, 190 cc fuel nozzles, 125 hp. Production: 1998-2001.
14. D16W5 - the same D16W4 but with VTEC-E system. Power is 124 hp. It was being produced from 2000 to 2006 and installed in Honda HRV.
15. D16W7 - SOHC head, VTEC-E, 10.9 compression ratio, 115 hp. Production: 2001-2007.
16. D16W9 - the engine got 3-Stage VTEC. It produced 130 hp. 2001-2005.
17. D16Y1 - SOHC VTEC, 9.3 compression ratio, 131 hp. 1992-1995.
18. D16Y3 - SOHC head with camshaft installed from D16A6, 9.4 CR and 113 hp. It was being produced from 1995 to 1997.
19. D16Y4 - analog of D15Y3, but it had another camshaft. 1996-2000.
20. D16Y5 - analog of D16Y3 equipped with VTEC-E system, the intake valves diameter is 30 mm, 26 mm - exhaust, 190 cc fuel nozzles, the power is 115 hp. The VTi version produced 127 hp. Production: 1996-2000.
21. D16Y7 - 180 cc fuel nozzles, 107 hp. Production: 1996-2000.
22. D16Y8 (D16Y6) - SOHC VTEC, camshaft duration is 246/230 deg, diameter of intake valves is 30 mm, exhaust - 26 mm, new pistons, compression ratio is 9.6, 240 cc nozzles, the power is 127 hp. Production years: 1996-2000.
23. D16Y9 - D16Y4 with new camshaft, power range is 107-111 hp. Production: 1996-2000.
24. D16Z5 - analog of D16A9 with a catalytic converter produced 124 hp. Production: 1989-1992.
25. D16Z6 - SOHC VTEC, camshaft duration is 244/228, 9.2 compression ratio, 235 cc fuel nozzles, 125 hp. Production: 1992-1996.
26. D16Z7 - analog of D16Z6 with a compression ratio 9.6:1. The power is 127 hp. It was being produced from 1996 to 2000.
27. D16Z9 - SOHC VTEC, 9.3 CR, 130 hp. Production: 1994-1995.
28. SOHC ZC - VTEC, 9.2 compression ratio, 130 hp. It was being produced from 1991 to 1995.
29. DOHC ZC - twin cam cylinder head, the compression ratio is 9.3 (9.5 since 1988), 100 hp with carburetor and 115-130 hp with fuel injection. It was being produced from 1984 to 1995.

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Honda VTEC Engine Assembly - D15/D16 Mini-Me - Part 1

Honda D16 Engine – Everything You Need To Know

After reviewing several of Honda’s highest-regarded engines, it’s the D-Series turn this time around, and we’re covering everything you could ever need to know about Honda’s D16 engine.

honda d16


Introduction

Although you may be surprised to see a Honda engine guide here at Drifted, we’re well aware that many drifting fans begin their path into the tuning world with the likes of Civic’s, and given the D16’s popularity, it’s an engine that we just had to explore.

We’ve already looked at some of Honda’s most legendary powerplants, such as the B16, K20, and the K24.

So, if you’re a Honda fan, we highly recommend checking these out when you’ve finished this guide, especially if you’re not sure which engine best suits your needs.

Production began for the D-series engine in 1984, with the 1.5-liter D15-series engine initially found in the Honda CRX throughout the US and Europe.

The inline-four D-series would later feature in some of the most common Honda’s on the market alongside the CRX, such as the Civic, Stream, Logo, and of course, the Integra.

civic ex rolling shot photo blue

Just two years after production began for the D-series, Honda opted to produce an engine with an increased displacement, which is when the 1.6-liter D16 was born.

Based upon the 1.5-liter aluminium block of the D15 engine, Honda increased the deck height for the D16 to 212mm (an increase of 4.5mm), with a 90mm stroke crankshaft, 137mm connecting rods, and 75mm pistons.

Although they share the same cylinder bore, the piston stroke’s increase enabled Honda to achieve the desired displacement of 1.6-liters.

Given the D-series’ high availability, particularly with the D16, it’s becoming an increasingly popular choice for both tuners and those seeking an immensely reliable powerplant over the years.

Thanks to the mass-production scale, used D16’s are prevalent in the US and conveniently sourced for incredibly low prices, making them the perfect candidate for upgrading.

crx show stance camber

Not only are they cheap and highly available, but they’re also extremely lightweight, and many of the D16 engines feature Honda’s legendary VTEC technology, which makes them highly desirable.

Combine these positives with a respectable amount of off-the-shelf aftermarket support, and there’s no wonder that so many Honda enthusiasts are opting for Honda’s D16 engine with their tuning builds.

There has been an immense number of minor variations throughout the D16’s incredibly long lifespan, which lasted over twenty years, from 1986 to 2007, and although they all have 16-valves, some feature SOHC, while others have DOHC.

On top of that, there are also VTEC and non-VTEC variations to consider, so it’s important to know that you’re getting the best bang for your buck before you purchase.

In this guide, we’ll be explaining the differences between the many D16 engine variations before explaining how to unleash the true power potential with aftermarket support and any common issues that you may need to consider before doing so.


Honda D16 Generations & Specs

The D16 engine had an incredible amount of revisions for the various models worldwide during its twenty-year history, and we’ll take a look into each specific model in this section.

Although the D16 is extremely popular among tuning enthusiasts, the earlier versions were far less desirable, with two of the more popular performance-based offerings – the SOHC VTEC-based D16Y8 and D16Z6, not reaching the market until the nineties.

Many Honda fanboys will argue that the D16 never matched the legacy of the B16. Honda initially had economic benefits as the main priority when they created the D16, where the B16 was more performance-oriented.

Throughout its twenty-year history, the compression ratio varied between 9.1:1 and 12.5:1 with a displacement of 1,590cc.

The cylinder block and cylinder head on the D16 are cast aluminium, with an inline-four configuration and SOHC, DOHC, VTEC, and non-VTEC variations.

blue honda crx

Although it was only capable of 103 hp initially, Honda later revised the engine to reach its maximum power in its stock form of 130 hp, with torque output ranging between 99 ft/lb through to 116 ft/lb.

Honda has utilized a deck height of 212mm, alongside a 90mm stroke crankshaft, 137mm connecting rods, and 75mm pistons.

Let’s take a look at the rather insane number of revisions that Honda carried out to the D16 engines over its extensive history.

D16A1

  • 1986-1989 – Acura Integra (US)

The A1 was the first engine to hit the D16 engine line-up in 1986, before production came to a halt in 1989.

It featured a DOHC head and initially pushed out 113 hp at 6,250 rpm and 99 lb/ft torque at 5,500 rpm with an initial compression ratio of 9.3:1.

It would later receive a revised piston upgrade in 1988, which increased the compression ratio to 9.5:1 and a slight power increase, providing its maximum 118 hp output at 6,500 rpm and 103 lb/ft torque at 5,500 rpm.

D16A3

  • 1986-1989 – Honda Integra (Australia)

The DOHC D16A3 was the same as the later-revised D16A1, explicitly built for the Australian market for use in the Acura Integra.

D16A6 (D16Z2)

  • 1988-1991 – Honda Civic Si, CRX Si
  • 1990-1991 – Honda Civic EX (4dr), Civic Wagon RT4WD (US)
  • 1988-1995 – Honda Civic Shuttle RT4WD (UK/Europe/Asia/AU/NZ)
  • 1989-1996 – Rover 216/416 GSi/Tourer (UK/Europe)

Produced between 1988 to 1996 and featured in numerous vehicles, the A6 featured a 9.1:1 compression ratio and SOHC.

The 1988 version had 105 hp, where the later versions had 108 hp alongside 100 lb/ft torque.

D16A7

  • 1988-1991 – Honda Civic GTi (New Zealand)
  • 1988-1989 – Honda Civic ED4, ED7 (Europe)
  • 1995 – Honda Civic EG4 (New Zealand)
  • 1988-1995 Models (South Africa)
  • 1994 – Honda Civic GTi (New Zealand)
  • Ballade – SH4 & SR4 (EE4)

The D16A7 is near-identical to the D16A6, besides the fact that it no longer features a catalytic converter.

With 117 hp at 5,900 rpm and 101 lb/ft torque at 4,800 rpm, it features a compression ratio of 9.6:1 and is SOHC.

D16A8

  • 1988-1995 – Honda Civic/CRX/Concerto (UK/Europe/Australia)
  • 1992-1995 – Rover 216/416 GTi (UK/Europe)
  • 1993-1997 – Rover 216 Sport Coupé (Europe)

With a compression ratio of 9.5:1, this DOHC engine was capable of 120 hp at 6,800 rpm, and 108 lb/ft torque at 5,900 rpm.

D16A9

  • 1988-1991 – Honda Concerto (UK/Europe)
  • 1988-1991 – Honda CRX 1.6i-16 (UK/Europe/South Africa)
  • 1990-1992 – Honda Ballade 160i-DOHC (South Africa)
  • 1988-1991 – Honda Civic 1.6i-16 (UK/Europe)
  • 1992-1993 – Honda Civic GTi (New Zealand)
  • 1989-1992 – Rover 216/416 GTi (UK/Europe)
  • 1992-1995 – Honda Civic Si (Japan, Europe, and Peru)

The DOHC D16A9 is near-identical to the D16A8, besides the fact that it no longer features a catalytic converter.

Its power output varied slightly between 125-129 hp at 6,800 rpm, and 105 lb/ft torque at 5,700 rpm.

D16B2

  • 1998-2001 – Honda Civic Aerodeck MC1 LS/ES/SR
  • 1997-2000 – Rover 416 Si Automatic

The D16B2 returned to the SOHC valvetrain, with 116 hp and 105 lb/ft torque.

D16B5

  • 1998-2000 – Honda Civic GX

This engine uses the SOHC VTEC-E system with a 12.5:1 compression ratio, achieving just 106 hp.

D16B6

  • 1999 – Honda Accord – CG7/CH5 (Europe)

The B6 provides 114 hp at 6,400 rpm and 103 lb/ft torque with its SOHC valvetrain.

D16V1

  • 1999-2005 – Honda Civic EM/EP2/EU8/ES7 (Europe)

Designed for the European market, the D16V1 used a SOHC head with VTEC alongside a 10.4:1 compression ratio, which provided 109 hp at 5,600 rpm and 112 lb/ft torque.

D16W1

  • 1999-2006 – Honda HRV

The non-VTEC SOHC D16 W1 provides 103 hp at 6,200 rpm and 100 lb/ft torque at 3,400 rpm with a 9.6:1 compression ratio.

D16W3

  • 1998-2001 – Honda Civic Aerodeck MC1 LS/SR

The W3 was another non-VTEC SOHC engine, this time with a 10.4:1 compression ratio and a power output of 116 hp.

D16W4

  • 1999-2000 – Honda Civic MB4 VTEC/ES
  • 1998-2001 – Honda Civic Aerodeck MC1 VTEC/ES

VTEC returned to help push out 126 hp at 6,600 rpm from this SOHC engine, which achieved 106 lb/ft torque at 5,500 rpm with a compression ratio of 9.6:1.

D16W5

  • 2000-2006 – Honda HRV

This engine was the same as the D16W4 but utilized the VTEC-E system, which provided 122 hp.

D16W7

  • 2005-2007 – Honda Civic Vti-L/ Vti (Asia)
  • 2001-2005 – Honda Civic ES (Europe, Turkey, Singapore)

The SOHC VTEC-E W7 featured 115 hp at 5,600 rpm and 112 lb/ft torque at 4,300 rpm in the Asian model, and 110 hp and 112 lb/ft torque for the European, Turkish, and Singaporean models, with a 10.9:1 compression ratio.

D16W9

  • 2001-2005 – Honda Civic VTi (Philippines, Pakistan)

With a power output of 130 hp at 6,600 rpm, and torque of 111 lb/ft at 5,500 rpm, the W9 featured the 3-stage VTEC, VTEC3, with the first VTEC switchover at 2,500 rpm, and the second at 5,500 rpm.

D16Y1

  • 1992-1995 – Honda Civic VTi (Australia)

The SOHC Y1 was built for the Australian market and featured a compression ratio of 9.3:1 with 129 hp at 6,600 rpm, and 107 lb/ft torque at 5,200 rpm. VTEC switchover took place at 5,000rpm.

D16Y2

  • 1995-1997 – Honda Civic MB1 SR

The SOHC VTEC Y2 engine had a compression ratio of 9.5:1, which provided 126 hp at 6,500 rpm, and 106 lb/ft torque at 5,200 rpm. VTEC switchover takes place at 5,500 rpm.

D16Y3

  • 1995-1997 – Honda Civic MB1 LS (UK/Europe)
  • 1996-1997 – Rover 416 SLI Auto (UK/Europe)

The SOHC Y3 has 111 hp at 5,600 rpm, 103 lb/ft at 5,100 rpm, and a compression ratio of 9.4:1.

D16Y4

  • 1998-2000 – Honda Civic iES (Turkey)
  • 1996-2000 – Honda Civic CXi, GL, GLi (New Zealand, Australia)

With a power output of 118 hp at 6,400 rpm at 106 lb/ft at 5,000 rpm, the Y4 also has a compression ratio of 9.4:1.

D16Y5

  • 1996-2000 – Honda Civic HX
  • 1996 – Honda Civic EX Sedan (Peru)
  • 1996-2000 – Honda Civic VTI Sedan (Australia)

While the HX and EX models were given 115 hp at 5,600 rpm and 104 lb/ft torque at 4,500 rpm, the Australian VTI model has 118 hp and 107 lb/ft torque. Both versions have SOHC VTEC-E and a compression ratio of 9.4:1.

D16Y7

  • 1996-2000 – Honda Civic DX/VP/LX/CX
  • 1998-2000 – Honda Civic Special Edition – SE/EX (Canada)
  • 1996-1997 – Honda Del Sol S
  • 1996-1997 – Honda Civic Coupé LSI

The popular SOHC Y7 has a compression ratio of 9.4:1, which provides 106 hp at 6,200 rpm and 103 lb/ft torque at 4,600 rpm.

D16Y8

  • 1996-1997 – Honda Del Sol Si (US)
  • 1996-2000 – Honda Civic EX (US, UK)
  • 1996-1998 – Honda Civic Coupe (UK)
  • 1996-2000 – Honda Civic Si (Canada)
  • 1997-2000 – Acura 1.6 EL (Canada)

The D16Y8 is also known in New Zealand as the D16Y6 and is one of the most desirable D16 engines.

With SOHC VTEC and a compression ratio of 9.6:1, it’s capable of pushing out 127 hp at 6,600 rpm with 107 lb/ft torque at 5,500 rpm with the VTEC switchover kicking in at 5,600 rpm.

D16Y9

  • 1996-2000 – Honda Ballade/Civic (South Africa & Venezuela)

The Y9 is the same as the non-VTEC D16Y4, with the addition of a new camshaft.

This model’s power figures reportedly vary between 106-119 hp and 108lb/ft torque, with the South African model reportedly receiving the higher horsepower figures.

D16Z5

  • 1989-1992 – Honda CRX (Europe)

The Z5 is essentially the same as the A9, but with an added catalytic converter and lambda sensor.

This DOHC engine produces 122 hp at 6,800 rpm with 103 lb/ft torque and a compression ratio of 9.5:1.

D16Z6

  • 1992-1995 – Honda Civic Si
  • 1992-1995 – Honda Civic EX, EX-V
  • 1992-1995 – Honda Civic ESi (Europe)
  • 1993-1995 – Honda Del Sol Si (US)
  • 1993-1996 – Honda Del Sol ESi (Europe)

The Z6 is another desirable model, which has SOHC VTEC and a compression ratio of 9.2:1, achieving 125 hp at 6,600 rpm and 106 lb/ft torque at 5,200 rpm with the VTEC switchover taking place at 4,800 rpm.

D16Z7

  • 1996-2000 Honda Civic EX Coupé

Another desirable VTEC engine, achieving a more respectable 127 hp at 6,600 rpm, with 107 lb/ft torque at 5,500 rpm and a compression ratio of 9.6:1.

D16Z9

  • 1994-1995 – Honda Civic Coupé (EJ1) ESi (Europe)
  • 1994-1995 – Honda Civic Sedan (EH5) EX (US)

Another respectable power offering was the SOHC Z9, which pushed out 130 hp at 6,600 rpm and 106 lb/ft torque at 5,200 rpm, with VTEC switchover taking place at 4,800 rpm and a compression ratio of 9.3:1.


Honda D16 Tuning & Upgrades

Although the D16 can often get overlooked by enthusiasts for some of the more popular tuning engines, such as the B16, it certainly packs some potential if you are willing to explore its tuning capabilities.

The main criticisms with the D16 are the low displacement and low factory output, but as always, there are ways to unlock insane power figures if you’re willing to put in the work.

We’ve witnessed several D16 builds around the 500 hp mark, with some even reaching up to 700 hp.

Eager to see the potential that a SOHC D16 has to offer? Turn up your speakers and enjoy this 9-second quarter-mile at the strip.

As always, when it comes to tuning, the more cold airflow into your engine, the better.

Although turbocharging is the obvious method with the D16, we understand that it isn’t for everyone, so we’ll first explore some alternative options.

One of the popular upgrades, especially for the Y7 engines, is to install a Y8 manifold, which provides a small, but reasonably-priced power increase, also allowing increased airflow.

Most will also opt for an aftermarket exhaust, and although it’s not likely to provide much in the way of power gains on a low-horsepower engine, it can certainly improve the looks and sounds.

On a naturally aspirated D16, we’d typically opt for a 1.5-2.5” inner diameter.

However, if you’re considering going with forced induction further down the line, then make sure you opt for a larger diameter exhaust to save swapping out twice.

Although this may hinder the initial gains, you’ll thank us later.

Alongside the exhaust is a cold air intake or a panel air filter, which will again improve the sound and responsiveness, even if the actual gains are small.

red valve cover

After that, you can consider upgrading the camshaft and headers and considering installing a piggyback ECU.

Fuel pump upgrades, a ported and polished head, high-flow injectors, and full exhaust systems can also become a consideration further down the line, and these should get the engine flowing optimally.

If you’re open to spending big bucks, alongside turbocharging, there are various stages of cams, piston upgrades, and other extras such as bigger valves and titanium retainers.

Suppose you do happen to reach this point. In that case, you’ll also need to consider engine management, which is where systems like Hondata will prove valuable, or you could opt for standalone management for the ultimate setup.

Be aware that the more aggressive you end up going with tuning, and cams in particular, the harsher the car will be for daily use, which could end up turning your daily driver into a nightmare in traffic.

Turbocharging & Supercharging

The D16 is a great candidate for forced induction due to its price and availability if things happen to go a little unplanned!

As always, with a forced induction build, we highly recommend that you ensure you’re starting with a good quality block by checking for any apparent issues and also carrying out a compression test.

There are some extremely reasonable-priced offerings out there if you’re interested in turbocharging, and CXRacing offers a 300-350 hp-setup, as well as a high-powered 400-500 hp alternative.

Although you can’t expect to strap a turbo onto your stock D16 and expect to impress at the drag strip, the CXRacing equipment provides excellent value for money alongside the correct supporting mods and management.

On the other hand, if you’re considering going down the supercharger route, the Kraftwerks and Jackson Racing options are typically the most popular choices.

We highly recommend doing your research if forced induction is an avenue you’d like to explore, and we can certainly understand why it can be a temptation with the D16!

However, if you take shortcuts and attempt to get the job done as cheaply as possible, you’ll likely need to be prepared to get block-shopping far sooner than you’d like.


Honda D16 Common Issues & Maintenance

We’re sure you’re already aware, but Honda engines are notoriously reliable, and the D16 is certainly no exception.

As always, regular servicing and maintenance are vital, particularly when it comes to frequent oil changes, but we’ve frequently seen these top over 180,000-200,000 miles and still going.

Of course, if you start strapping turbo kits and carrying out significant tuning upgrades, you’re likely to limit the life a little, but assuming you use reputable shops/tuners, we’d still expect to see impressive reliability.

honda civic show car modified

Some things to look out for when looking at a D16 are that they can sometimes suffer from oil leaks, which should be relatively easy to spot, as well as misfiring.

Should you hear a rough idle, it’s likely to be something as simple, which is usually the throttle body or idle control valve requiring a clean. If that doesn’t solve it, it’s likely to fall to the o2 sensor.

If the engine sounds continuously rough and almost diesel-like, it’s likely to be an issue with the exhaust manifold, so it’s worth taking it off and seeing if there are any cracks.

Since they’re so cheap to source, we’d recommend replacing or upgrading, rather than repairing.

If you’re looking at a higher-mileage D16, don’t be put off, but we do recommend ensuring that it has a service history that shows frequent oil changes and the usual maintenance that Honda recommends, alongside checking for the minor issues above.


Conclusion

The D16 often sits in the shadows of its Honda siblings, but some of the better variations, such as the D16Y8, can also make for great potential engine swaps, especially if you’re planning a turbocharged setup.

Given their impressive availability and price, it offers a great platform to take the first steps into engine tuning without breaking the bank if things don’t go quite to plan.

Sure, it’s going to be an inconvenience, but we’d prefer to learn the hard way now, rather than when you’re looking at the likes of the far less-reasonable 2JZ or SR20 eventually.

Given its low compression, the D16 takes well to turbocharging.

However, it can be a little disappointing if you’re planning to try and extract some decent power figures from the D16 with simple bolt-on mods, as the output isn’t there.

There are several potential routes to explore on your Honda D16 tuning journey, though, and we wish you all the luck with reaching your goals!

So, there we have it! We hope that we’ve covered everything you could want to know about the Honda D16 in this guide.

If you’re also interested in the other engines that Honda has to offer, make sure you check out our comprehensive Honda B-Series guide.

Thank you for reading our Honda D16 guide.

If you enjoyed this article, then please share it with the buttons at the side and bottom of your screen. If you’ve found this information useful, then please take a moment to share it with other Honda enthusiasts. We appreciate your support.


Photography credits

We thank the following entities for the use of their photography in this article:

Tags: d16, vtec

author avatarWritten by Joe TerrellDrifted.com founder, motoring journalist and all-round car enthusiast. Read more about Joe and the Drifted team on our about uspage.

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Civic d16

Honda D engine

Former Japanese automobile engines

The Honda D series inline-four cylinder engine is used in a variety of compact models, most commonly the Honda Civic, CRX, Logo, Stream, and first-generation Integra. Engine displacement ranges between 1.2 and 1.7 liters. The D Series engine is either SOHC or DOHC, and might include VTEC variable valve timing. Power ranges from 66 PS (49 kW) in the Logo to 130 PS (96 kW) in the Civic Si. D-series production commenced 1984 and ended 2005. D-series engine technology culminated with production of the D15B 3-stage VTEC (D15Z7) which was available in markets outside of the United States. Earlier versions of this engine also used a single port fuel injection system Honda called PGM-CARB, signifying the carburetor was computer controlled.

D12 series engines (1.2 liter) [edit]

D12A[edit]

  • Found in:
    • 1986-1988 Honda Civic & City GG G-Mark Special (Japanese Market)
      • Displacement: 1237 cc (75.5 cu in)
      • Bore and Stroke: 72 mm x 76 mm (2.83 in x 2.99 in)
      • Compression: 9,5:1
      • Power: 76 PS (56 kW; 75 hp) at 6500 rpm
      • Torque: 10.0 kg⋅m (98 N⋅m; 72 lb⋅ft) at 4000 rpm
      • Valvetrain: SOHC (4 valves per cylinder)
      • Fuel Control: Single Carburetor

D12B1[edit]

  • Found in:
    • 1988-1990 Honda Civic (European Market)
      • Displacement: 1,193 cc (72.8 cu in)
      • Bore and Stroke: 75.0 mm × 67.5 mm (2.95 in × 2.66 in)
      • Compression: 8,6:1
      • Power: 74 PS (54 kW; 73 hp) at 6300 rpm
      • Torque: 88 N⋅m (9.0 kg⋅m) at 3500 rpm
      • Valvetrain: SOHC (4 valves per cylinder)
      • Fuel Control: Single Carburetor PGM-CARB

D13 series engines (1.3 liter) [edit]

D13B1[edit]

  • Found in:
    • 1988–1995 Honda Civic EC (European Market)
      • Displacement : 1,343 cc (82.0 cu in)
      • Bore and Stroke : 75.0 mm × 76.0 mm (2.95 in × 2.99 in)
      • Compression : 9.5:1
      • Power : 76 PS (56 kW; 75 hp) at 6300 rpm
      • Torque: 102 N⋅m (10.4 kg⋅m) at 3100 rpm
      • Valvetrain : SOHC (4 valves per cylinder)
      • Fuel Control : Single Carburetor PGM-CARB

D13B2[edit]

  • Found in:
    • 1992–1995 Honda Civic DX/EX (European Market)
      • Displacement: 1,343 cc (82.0 cu in)
      • Bore and Stroke: 75.0 mm × 76.0 mm (2.95 in × 2.99 in)
      • Compression: 9:1
      • Power: 75 PS (55 kW; 74 hp) at 6300 rpm[1]
      • Torque: 102 N⋅m (10.4 kg⋅m; 75 lb⋅ft) at 3100 rpm[1]
      • Valvetrain: SOHC, four valves per cylinder
      • Cam Gear: 38 teeth
      • Piston Code: PM1G
      • Head Code: PM3
      • Fuel Control: Single electronic carburettor PGM-CARB
      • ECU: P01 OBD-0

D13B4[edit]

  • Found in:
    • 1996–2002 Honda City LXi/EXi/DX, 1995-2000 Honda Civic EK2
      • Displacement : 1,343 cc (82.0 cu in)
      • Bore and Stroke : 75.0 mm × 76.0 mm (2.95 in × 2.99 in)
      • Compression: 9.75:1
      • Power: 95 PS (70 kW) at 6500 rpm[2] (City)
         91 PS (67 kW) at 6,300 rpm[3] (Civic)
      • Torque: 119 N⋅m (12.1 kg⋅m; 88 lb⋅ft) at 4700 rpm[2] (City)
         114 N⋅m (11.6 kg⋅m; 84 lb⋅ft) at 4800 rpm[3] (Civic)
      • Valvetrain : SOHC (four valves per cylinder), 16 valves
      • Fuel Control : Multi-point fuel Injection, PGM-FI

D13B7[edit]

  • Found in:
    • 1998–2001 Honda Logo
      • Displacement : 1,343 cc (82.0 cu in)
      • Bore and Stroke : 75.0 x 76.0 mm
      • Compression : 9.2
      • Power : 66 PS (48.5 kW; 65.1 hp) at 5000 rpm
      • Torque : 11.3 kg⋅m (110.8 N⋅m; 81.7 lbf⋅ft) at 2500 rpm
      • Valvetrain : SOHC (2 valves per cylinder)
      • Fuel Control : Multi-point fuel Injection, PGM-FI

D13C[edit]

  • Found in:
    • 1989–1994 Honda City CE, CE Fit, CE Select, CG, CR-i, CR-i limited, CZ-i, New Fit (Japanese Market)
      • Displacement : 1,296 cc (79.1 cu in)
      • Bore and Stroke : 73.7mm x 76.0 mm
      • Compression : 9.6:1
      • Power : 100 PS (73.5 kW; 98.6 hp) at 6500 rpm
      • Torque : 11.6 kg⋅m (113.8 N⋅m; 83.9 lb⋅ft) at 5500 rpm
      • Valvetrain : SOHC (4 valves per cylinder)
      • Fuel Control : Multi-point fuel Injection, PGM-FI

D14 series engines (1.4 liter) [edit]

D14A1[edit]

  • Found in:
    • 1987–1991 Honda Civic GL and 1990 CRX (European market)
    • October 1989 – 1994 Honda Concerto GL (European market)
      • Displacement: 1,396 cc (85.2 cu in)
      • Bore and Stroke: 75.0 mm × 79.0 mm (2.95 in × 3.11 in)
      • Compression: 9.3:1
      • Power: 90 PS (66 kW; 89 hp) at 6,300 rpm[4]
         88 PS (65 kW; 87 hp) in the Concerto[5]
      • Torque: 11.4 kg⋅m (112 N⋅m; 82 lb⋅ft) at 4,500 rpm
      • Valvetrain: SOHC (four valves per cylinder)
      • Fuel Control: Dual Carburetor PGM-CARB
      • Piston Code: PM2

D14A2[edit]

  • Found in:
    • 1995–1997 Honda Civic MA8 (European Market)
      • Displacement : 1,396 cc (85.2 cu in)
      • Bore and Stroke : 75.0 mm × 79.0 mm (2.95 in × 3.11 in)
      • Compression : 9.2:1
      • ECU code: P1J
      • Power : 90 PS (66 kW; 89 hp) at 6,100 rpm
      • Torque : 86 lb·ft (11.9 kg/m, 117 Nm) at 5,000 rpm
      • Valvetrain : SOHC (4 valves per cylinder)
      • Fuel Control : OBD-1, MPFIMulti-point fuel Injection, PGM-FI
      • Redline : 6,800 rpm
      • Fuel cutout : 7,250 rpm

D14A3[edit]

  • Found in:
    • 1996–2000 Honda Civic 1.4i EJ9 (European Market)
      • Displacement : 1,396 cc (85.2 cu in)
      • Bore and Stroke : 75.0 mm × 79.0 mm (2.95 in × 3.11 in)
      • Compression : 9.1:1
      • ECU code: P3X
      • Power : 75 PS (55 kW; 74 hp) at 6,000 rpm[6]
      • Torque : 109 N⋅m (11.1 kg⋅m; 80 lb⋅ft) at 3,000 rpm[6]
      • Valvetrain : SOHC (4 valves per cylinder), non VTEC
      • Redline : 6,800 rpm
      • Fuel cut: 7,200 rpm
      • Fuel Control : OBD2-a, DPFI (SFi – Simplified Fuel injection), 1+3 2+4 injectors thrown together
      • Transmission: S40

D14A4[edit]

  • Found in:
    • 1996–1998 Honda Civic 1.4iS EJ9 (European Market)
      • Displacement : 1,396 cc (85.2 cu in)
      • Bore and Stroke : 75.0 mm × 79.0 mm (2.95 in × 3.11 in)
      • Compression : 9.1:1
      • Piston code: P3Y
      • Piston Compression height: 29.5 mm
      • Piston dish volume: -5.4 cc
      • ECU code: P3Y
      • Big-end bore: 43 mm
      • Rod length (center to center): 138 mm
      • Power: 90 PS (66 kW; 89 hp) at 6,300 rpm[6]
      • Torque : 124 N⋅m (12.6 kg⋅m; 91 lb⋅ft) at 4,500 rpm[6]
      • Valvetrain : SOHC, four valves per cylinder, non VTEC
      • Red line : 6,800 rpm
      • Fuel cut: 7,200 rpm
      • Fuel Control : OBD2-a, DPFI (SFi – Simplified Fuel injection), 1+4 2+3 injectors thrown together
      • Transmission : S40 (or S4PA for 4AT)
      • Deck Height : 207 mm

The D14A3 and D14A4 engines are identical, the difference is the addition of a small gasket under the throttle body in the D14A3 which restricts the air intake of the engine, lowering the power output. This was done in some European countries to suit local insurance categories.

D14A5[edit]

  • Found in:
    • 1995 - 1997 Honda Civic MA8 (European Market)
      • Displacement : 1,396 cc (85.2 cu in)
      • Bore and Stroke : 75.0 mm × 79.0 mm (2.95 in × 3.11 in)
      • Compression : 9.2:1
      • ECU code: P1J
      • Power : 75 PS (55 kW; 74 hp) at 6,100 rpm
      • Valvetrain : SOHC (4 valves per cylinder)
      • Fuel Control : OBD-1, MPFIMulti-point fuel Injection, PGM-FI
      • Redline : 6,800 rpm
      • Fuel cutout : 7,250 rpm

The D14A2 and D14A5 engines are identical, the difference is the addition of a small gasket under the throttle body in D14A5 which restricts the air intake of the engine, lowering the power output. This was done in some European countries to suit local insurance categories.

D14A7[edit]

  • Found in:
    • 1997–2000 Honda Civic 1.4i MB2/MB8 (UK Market)
      • Displacement: 1,396 cc (85.2 cu in)
      • Compression: 9.0:1
      • Power: 75 PS (55 kW; 74 hp) at 6,000 rpm
      • Torque: 112 N⋅m (83 lb⋅ft) at 3,000 rpm
      • Valvetrain: SOHC (4 valves per cylinder), non VTEC

D14A8[edit]

  • Found in:
    • 1997–2000 Honda Civic 1.4iS MB2/MB8. UK and (at least) Germany.
      • Displacement : 1,396 cc (85.2 cu in)
      • Compression : 9.0:1
      • Power : 90 PS (66 kW; 89 hp) at 6,400 rpm
      • Torque : 120 N⋅m (12.2 kg⋅m; 88.5 lb⋅ft) at 4,800 rpm
      • Valvetrain : SOHC (4 valves per cylinder), non VTEC

The D14A7 and D14A8 engines are identical, the difference is only one small gasket under the throttle body in D14A7 which restricts the air intake of the engine, this happen in some European countries.

They are also almost identical to the D14A3 and D14A4 engines. Differences are only in the compression ratio and some different mounted components.

D14Z1[edit]

  • Found in:
    • 1999–2000 Honda Civic EJ9 (1.4i, Europe)
      • Compression: 9.7:1
      • Power: 75 PS (55 kW; 74 hp)
      • Valvetrain: SOHC, 4 valves per cylinder, non VTEC
      • Bore and Stroke: 75.0 mm × 79.0 mm (2.95 in × 3.11 in)
      • Piston Code: phxg
      • Rod Length: 138 mm
      • Rod/Stroke: 1.747
      • Redline: 6800 rpm
      • Fuel cut: 7200 rpm

D14Z2[edit]

  • Found in:
    • 1999–2000 Honda Civic EJ9 (1.4iS, Europe)
      • Displacement: 1,396 cc (85.2 cu in)
      • Compression: 9.7:1
      • Power: 90 PS (66 kW; 89 hp) at 6,300 rpm
      • Valvetrain: SOHC, 4 valves per cylinder, non VTEC
      • Bore and Stroke: 75.0 mm × 79.0 mm (2.95 in × 3.11 in)
      • Piston Code: phxg
      • Redline: 6,800 rpm
      • Fuel cut: 7,200 rpm

The D14Z1 and D14Z2 engines are identical, the difference is only one small gasket under the throttle body in D14Z1 which restricts the air intake of the engine, this happen in some European countries.

D14Z3[edit]

  • Found in:
    • 1999–2000 Honda Civic MB2 (1.4i, Europe), MB8 (1.4 SR, UK Market)
      • Displacement : 1,396 cc (85.2 cu in)
      • Compression : 9.0:1
      • Power : 75 PS (55 kW; 74 hp) at 5,700 rpm[6]
      • Torque : 112 N⋅m (11.4 kg⋅m; 83 lb⋅ft) at 3,000 rpm
      • Valvetrain : SOHC, 4 valves per cylinder, non VTEC
      • Redline: 6,800 rpm
      • Fuel cut : 7,200 rpm

D14Z4[edit]

  • Found in:
    • 1999–2001 Honda Civic MB2 (1.4iS), MB8 (1.4SR; UK Market)
      • Displacement : 1,396 cc (85.2 cu in)
      • Bore and Stroke : 75.0 mm × 79.0 mm (2.95 in × 3.11 in)
      • Compression : 9.0:1
      • Power : 90 PS (66 kW; 89 hp) at 6400 rpm[6]
      • Torque : 120 N⋅m (89 lb⋅ft) at 4800 rpm
      • Valvetrain : SOHC, four valves per cylinder, non VTEC
      • Redline: 6800 rpm
      • Fuel cut : 7200 rpm

The D14Z3 and D14Z4 engines are identical, the difference is only one small gasket under the throttle body in D14Z3 which restricts the air intake of the engine, this happen in some European countries.

D14Z5[edit]

  • Found in:
    • 2001–2005 Honda Civic 1.4iS, LS (European market: ES4 nfl)
      • Engine Name: D14Z5
      • Displacement: 1396 cc
      • Bore and Stroke: 75 mm x 79 mm
      • Compression: 10.4:1
      • Cylinder Head: 16 valves, SOHC
      • Red Line: 6400 rpm
      • Fuel Cutoff: 6600 rpm
      • Fuel System: Honda PGM-FI
      • Rod/Stroke Ratio: ?:?
      • Stock BHP Rating: 90 PS (66 kW; 89 hp) at 5600 rpm
      • Stock torque rating: 130 N⋅m (96 lb⋅ft) at 4300 rpm
      • Rated Fuel Consumption: 0.52 -> 0.65 Liters pr. Metric Mile
      • Ecu Code: PMA

D14Z6[edit]

  • Found in:
    • 2001–2005 Honda Civic 1.4 LS (European market: EP1, EU4, EU7, ES4 fl, ES6)
      • Engine Name: D14Z6
      • Displacement: 1,396 cc
      • Bore and Stroke: 75 mm x 79 mm
      • Compression: 10.4:1
      • Cylinder Head: 16 valves, SOHC
      • Red Line: 6,400 rpm
      • Fuel Cutoff: 6,600 rpm
      • Fuel System: Honda PGM-FI
      • Rod/Stroke Ratio: ?:?
      • Stock BHP Rating: 90 hp (66 kW) at 5,600 rpm
      • Stock torque rating: 130 Nm at 4,300 rpm
      • Rated Fuel Consumption: 0.52 -> 0.65 Liters pr. Metric Mile
      • Ecu Code: PMA

D15 series engines (1.5 liter) [edit]

D15A1[edit]

  • Found In:
    • 1984–1987 Honda CRX
      • Displacement : 1,488 cc
      • Bore and Stroke : 74.0 x 86.5 mm
      • Compression : 9.2:1
      • Power : 76 hp at 5,500 rpm
      • Torque : 84 lb·ftf at 3,500 rpm
      • Valvetrain : SOHC (3 valves per cylinder), non VTEC
      • Fuel Control : OBD-0 12/v PGM-CARB
      • Redline : 6,500 rpm
      • Economy : 31/38 mpg
      • Head code : EW-1
      • ECU : –
      • Transmission : DA48
      • Gear ratios : 2.38/ 1.76/ 1.18/ 0.85/ 0.71
      • Final drive ratio : 4.27

D15A2[edit]

  • Found in :
    • 1984–1987 Honda CRX HF Grifin
      • Displacement : 1,488 cc
      • Compression : 10.0:1
      • Power : 60 hp (45 kW) at 5,550 rpm
      • Torque : 73 lb·ft at 3,500 rpm
      • Redline : 6,000 rpm
      • Valvetrain : OBD-0 8/v EFI (HF Model)
      • Economy : 49/54 mpg
      • Gear ratios : 2.92/?/?/?/0.65
      • Final drive ratio : 3.58
    • Also found in 1984–1987 Honda CRX DX and HF (USA)
      • Displacement : 1,488 cc
      • Compression : ?
      • Power : ?
      • Torque : ?
      • Redline : 6,000 rpm
      • Valvetrain : 12V CVCC SOHC Carburetor
      • Economy : ?
      • Gear ratios : 3.250/1.894/1.259/0.937/0.771/(R)3.153
      • Final drive ratio : 3.88
    • 1987 Honda Civic Wagon RT4WD (Canadian Model)
      • Displacement : 1,488 cc
      • Compression : 9.2:1
      • Power : 76 hp at 5,500 rpm
      • Torque : 84 lb·ft at 3,500 rpm
      • Valvetrain : 12 valves, SOHC
      • Economy : 31-38 mpg

D15A3[edit]

  • Found in:
    • 1985–1987 Honda CRX Si and 1987 Civic Si (AU/NZ)
    • Stamped with EW3/EW4 1985-1986 before switching to D15A3 stamp in 1987
    • 1985–1987 Honda Civic 1.5i (Europe)
    • 1984–1987 Honda CRX 1.5i (Europe)
    • 1986–1987 Honda Civic Si Hatch (US)
      • Displacement : 1,488 cc (90.8 cu in)
      • Bore and Stroke : 74 mm × 86.5 mm (2.91 in × 3.41 in)
      • Compression : 8.7:1
      • Power : 91 hp (68 kW, 92 ps) at 5500 rpm
      • Power : 100 PS (74 kW) at 5750 rpm (Europe)
      • Torque : 93 lb·ft (12.9 kg/m, 126 Nm) at 4500 rpm
      • Valvetrain : SOHC (12 valves, three per cylinder )
      • Fuel Control : PGM-FI2

D15A4[edit]

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This section needs expansion. You can help by adding to it. (October 2020)

D15A5[edit]

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This section needs expansion. You can help by adding to it. (October 2020)

D15B[edit]

  • Found in:
    • 1988 Honda CRX 1.5X (rare)
    • 1990 Honda Civic 25XXT Formula (Japanese Market)
    • Honda Civic Ferio MX (Japanese Market) EG8
    • 1998–2001 Honda Capa GA4 (Japanese Market)
    • 1988-2001 Honda Civic SH4 EF1
      • Displacement : 1,493 cc (91.1 cu in)
      • Bore and Stroke : 75 mm × 84.5 mm (2.95 in × 3.33 in)
      • Compression : 9.2:1
      • Power : 103 hp (77.23 kW, 105 PS) at 6800 rpm
      • Torque : 14.1 kgm (133.4 Nm) at 5200 rpm
      • Rev limiter : 7200 rpm
      • Valvetrain : SOHC (4 valves per cylinder)
      • Fuel Control : Twin carburetor PGM-CARB/ Fuel Injected

D15B VTEC[edit]

  • Found in:
    • 1992–1995 Honda Civic Vti (Japanese Market)
    • 1992–1998 Honda CRX DelSol (Japanese Market)
      • Bore and Stroke: 75.0 × 84.5 mm
      • Displacement: 1,493 cc (91.1 cu in)
      • Rod Length: 137 mm
      • Rod/Stroke: 1.63
      • Compression: 9.3:1
      • Power: 130 PS (96 kW; 128 hp) at 6800 rpm[7]
      • Torque: 14.1 kg⋅m (138 N⋅m) at 5200 rpm[7]
      • VTEC Switchover : 4,600 rpm
      • Redline: 7200 rpm
      • Rev-limiter: 7200 rpm
      • Valvetrain: SOHC VTEC (4 valves per cylinder)
      • Fuel Control: OBD-1
      • Head Code: P08
      • ECU Code: P08 (small case ECU)***
3-stage VTEC
  • Found in:
    • 1995–1998 Honda Civic Ferio Vi (EK3, Japanese market)
    • 1999-2000 Honda Civic Vi-RS
    • 2001-2005 Honda Civic JDM VTEC (Japanese market, Europe)
      • Bore and Stroke :75,0×84,5 mm
      • Displacement : 1,493 cc (91.1 cu in)
      • Rod Length : 137 mm
      • Rod/Stroke : 1.62
      • Compression : 9.3:1
      • Power : 130 PS (96 kW; 128 hp) at 7000 rpm[8]
      • Torque: 139 Nm at 5300 rpm
      • Redline : 7200 rpm
      • Valvetrain : SOHC, four valves per cylinder
      • Connecting rod length : 137 mm
      • Connecting rod big end diameter : 48 mm
      • Fuel Control : OBD2b
      • Head Code : P2J-07
      • ECU Code: P2J (small case ECU)*** AUTO CVT: P2J-J63*** MT P2J-003*** & ***MT P2J-J11***
      • Piston code : P2J

D15B1[edit]

  • Found in:
    • 1988–1991 Honda Civic Hatchback
      • Displacement : 1,493 cc (91.1 cu in)
      • Bore and Stroke : 75 mm × 84.5 mm (2.95 in × 3.33 in)
      • Compression : 9.2:1
      • Power : 70 hp (52.2 kW, 71.0 PS) at 5,500 rpm[9]
      • Torque : 73 lb·ft (11.4 kgm, 112 Nm) at 3,000 rpm[9]
      • Valvetrain : SOHC (4 valves per cylinder) non-VTEC
      • Head Code : PM3
      • Fuel System : Dual Point injection (PGMFI)
      • ECU Code: PM9

D15B2[edit]

  • Found in:
    • 1988–1991 Honda Civic GL/DX/LX/CX (CX Canadian Market)
    • 1988–1991 Honda Civic Wagon Wagovan/DX
    • 1988–1991 Honda CRX DX
    • 1992–1995 Honda Civic LSi Hatch/Saloon (European Market)
    • 1992–1995 Honda Civic DXi Hatch/Saloon (European Market)
    • 1990–1995 Honda Concerto (European Market)
      • Displacement: 1,493 cc (91.1 cu in)
      • Bore and Stroke: 75 mm × 84.5 mm (2.95 in × 3.33 in)
      • Rod Length: 134 mm
      • Compression: 9.2:1
      • Power: 92 hp (69 kW) at 6,000 rpm (US)
         90 PS (66 kW) at 6,000 rpm (Europe)[10]
      • Torque: 88 lb·ft (12.2 kg/m, 119 Nm) at 4,700 rpm
      • Valvetrain: SOHC (4 valves per cylinder) non v-tec
      • Cam Gear: 38 tooth
      • Piston Code: PM3
      • Fuel Control: OBD-O DPFI
      • Redline: 6,500 rpm, 7,200 rpm rev limiter
      • Head Code: PM5
      • ECU Code: PM5/P04

D15B3[edit]

  • Found in:
    • 1988–1995 Honda Civic Shuttle GL
    • 1989–1996 Honda Ballade 150-16 & 150 (South Africa)
    • 1992–1995 Honda Civic LX (NZ model)
    • 1988–1991 Honda Civic LX/EX (NZ model)
    • 1992–1995 Honda Civic EX (SA model)
      • Displacement : 1,493 cc (91.1 cu in)
      • Bore and Stroke : 75 mm × 84.5 mm (2.95 in × 3.33 in)
      • Rod Length : 134 mm
      • Piston Code : PM3P
      • Compression : 9.2:1
      • Power : 77 kW (105 PS; 103 hp) at 6000 rpm
      • Torque : 89 lb·ft (13.55 kg/m, 121 Nm) at 4500 rpm
      • Redline : 6500 rpm
      • Valvetrain  : SOHC (4 valves per cylinder)
      • Cam Gear : 38 tooth
      • Fuel Control : PGM-CARB
      • Transmission : S20

D15B4[edit]

  • Found in:
    • 1989–1993 Honda Civic GL (Australian Market)
      • Displacement : 1,493 cc (91.1 cu in)
      • Bore and Stroke : 75 mm × 84.5 mm (2.95 in × 3.33 in)
      • Compression : 9.2:1
      • Power  : 74 kW (99 hp; 101 PS) at 5,200 rpm
      • Torque : 122 N⋅m (90 lb⋅ft) at 3,800 rpm
      • Valvetrain : SOHC (four valves per cylinder)

D15B5[edit]

  • VTEC-E
  • Found in:
    • 1992–1995 Honda Civic
      • Displacement : 1,493 cc (91.1 cu in)
      • Bore and Stroke : 75 mm × 84.5 mm (2.95 in × 3.33 in)
      • Valvetrain : SOHC VTEC (four valves per cylinder)
      • Rod Length : 137 mm
      • Head Code : P08
      • ECU Code : P08-030
      • Piston Code : P08-010
      • Piston Rod Code : PM6-000
      • Fuel Control : OBD-1 PGM-FI

D15B6[edit]

  • Found in:
    • 1988–1991 Honda Crx HF
      • Displacement : 1,493 cc (91.1 cu in)
      • Bore and Stroke : 75 mm × 84.5 mm (2.95 in × 3.33 in)
      • Compression : 9.1:1
      • Power :
      • ['88-'89] 62 bhp (46.2 kW, 62.9 PS) at 4400 rpm
      • ['90-'91] 72 bhp (53.7 kW, 73.0 PS) at 4500 rpm
      • Torque : 83 lb·ft (11.5 kg/m, 113 Nm) at 2200 rpm
      • Valvetrain : 8-Valve SOHC
      • Fuel Control : OBD-0 MPFI
      • Head Code : PM-8

colour wiring for heat sensor

D15B7[edit]

    • 1992–1995 Honda Civic GLi (Australian model)
    • 1992–1995 Honda Civic DX/LX
    • 1992–1995 Honda Civic LSi Coupé (European Market)
    • 1993–1995 Honda Civic Del Sol S
    • 1998-2000 Honda City SX8
      • Displacement : 1,493 cc (91.1 cu in)
      • Bore and Stroke : 75 mm × 84.5 mm (2.95 in × 3.33 in)
      • Compression : 9.2:1
      • Power : 102 hp (76.1 kW, 103 PS) at 5900 rpm
      • Torque : 98 lb·ft (13.5 kg/m, 133 Nm) at 5000 rpm
      • Valvetrain : 16-valve SOHC (four valves per cylinder)
      • Redline: 6500 rpm
      • Cam Gear: 38 tooth
      • Piston Code : PM3
      • Fuel Control : OBD-1 MPFI
      • ECU Code: P06
      • Head codes: PM 9–6, PM9–8

D15B8[edit]

  • Found in:
    • 1992–1995 Honda Civic CX (U.S. model)
      • Displacement : 1,493 cc (91.1 cu in)
      • Bore and Stroke : 75 mm × 84.5 mm (2.95 in × 3.33 in)
      • Compression : 9.1:1
      • Power : 70 hp (52.2 kW, 71.0 PS) at 4500 rpm
      • Torque : 83 lb·ft (11.5 kg/m, 113 Nm) at 2800 rpm
      • Valvetrain : 8-valve SOHC (two valves per cylinder)
      • Fuel cutoff : 5800 rpm
      • Cam Gear: 38 tooth
      • Fuel Control : OBD-1 MPFI
      • ECU Code : P05
      • Head codes: PM8-1, PM8-2

D15Z1[edit]

  • VTEC-E
  • Found in:
    • 1992–1995 Honda Civic VX
    • 1992–1995 Honda Civic VEi (European Market)
      • Displacement : 1,493 cc (91.1 cu in)
      • Bore and Stroke : 75 mm × 84.5 mm (2.95 in × 3.33 in)
      • Rod Length : 137 mm
      • Rod/Stroke : 1.62
      • Compression : 9.3:1
      • Power : 90 hp (67.1 kW, 91.3 ps) at 5,600 rpm (92 hp at 5,500 rpm; USDM)
      • Torque : 98 lb·ft (13.5 kg/m, 133 Nm) at 4,800 rpm (97 lb·ft at 3,000 rpm; USDM)
      • Valvetrain : 12-/16-valve SOHC VTEC-E (USDM- Lean Burn Federal Emissions 49 State) (3-4 valves per cyl depending on engine speed)
      • VTEC Switchover : 2,500 rpm
      • Fuel Control : OBD-1 MPFI
      • ECU Code : P07
      • Head code: PO7-1

D15Y3[edit]

  • Found in:
    • 2001–2006 Civic EXi (Africa, Dubai, Pakistan)
      • Displacement: 1.5 L, 1,493 cc (91.1 cu in)
      • Bore and Stroke: 75.0 mm × 84.5 mm (3 in × 3 in)
      • Compression Ratio: 10.3:1
      • Power: 118 to 120 hp (88 to 89 kW; 120 to 122 PS) at 6200 to 6300 rpm)
      • Torque: 145 Nm (14.5 kgm) (107 lb⋅ft) at 4,800 rpm
      • Redline Limiter: 6800 rpm
      • Valvetrain: SOHC four valves per cylinder (non-VTEC)
      • Fuel Control:EFI PGM-FI (Programmed Fuel Injection) OBD-2.

D15Y4[edit]

VTECSOHC or non-VTEC

  • Found in:
    • 2001–2006 Civic VTI (ES8) (VTEC) (Japan, Singapore, Malaysia, Sri Lanka)
    • 2001–2006 Civic EXi (ES8) (non-VTEC) (Japan, Singapore, Malaysia, Sri Lanka)
      • Displacement : 1,493 cc (91.1 cu in)
      • Bore and Stroke : 75.0 mm × 84.5 mm (3 in × 3 in)
      • Power: VTEC version 130 PS (96 kW; 128 hp) at 6200 rpm)
      • Torque : 145 Nm (14.5 kgm) at 4500 rpm
      • Valvetrain : SOHC four valves per cylinder (VTEC or non-VTEC)
      • Fuel Control : EFI PGM-FI (Programmed Fuel Injection) OBD-2

D15Z3[edit]

  • VTEC-E
  • Found in:
    • 1995–1997 Honda Civic MA9 (European Market)
      • Displacement : 1,493 cc (91.1 cu in)
      • Bore and Stroke : 75 mm × 84.5 mm (2.95 in × 3.33 in)
      • Rod Length : 137 mm
      • Rod/Stroke : 1.62
      • Compression : 9.3:1
      • Power : 90 hp (67.1 kW, 91.3 PS) at 5500 rpm
      • Torque : 98 lb·ft (13.5 kg/m, 133 Nm) at 4500 rpm
      • Valvetrain : SOHC VTEC-E (3-4 valves per cylinder depending on engine speed)
      • VTEC Switchover : 3,000 - 3,800 rpm (depending on engine load)
      • Fuel Control : OBD-1 MPFI
      • ECU code : P1G
      • Redline : 6,000 rpm
      • Fuel cutout : 6,300 rpm

D15Z4[edit]

  • Found in:
    • 1996–2000 Honda Ballade/Civic in South Africa & Venezuela
    • 1996–2000 Honda Civic LXi/EXi in the Philippines/Middle East/Trinidad & Tobago
      • Displacement : 1,493 cc (91.1 cu in)
      • Bore and Stroke : 75 mm × 84.5 mm (2.95 in × 3.33 in)
      • Power : 90 hp (67 kW) or 105 hp (78 kW) at 5,800 rpm
      • Torque : 99–103 lb⋅ft (134–140 N⋅m) :confirm? at 4,200 rpm
      • Redline : 7,200 rpm
      • Rev-limiter: 7,411 rpm
      • Valvetrain : SOHC non-VTEC, four valves per cylinder
      • Piston code : P2CY
      • Head Code : P2A-9
      • Fuel Control : SFI (Simple Fuel Injection)
      • Ecu Code : P2C/P2E

D15Z6[edit]

  • SOHC VTEC-E
  • Found in:
    • 1995–2000 Honda Civic 1.5i LS (European Market)
      • Displacement : 1,493 cc (91.1 cu in)
      • Bore and Stroke : 75 mm × 84.5 mm (2.95 in × 3.33 in)
      • Rod Length : 137 mm
      • Compression : 9.6:1
      • Power : 114 PS (84 kW) at 6,500 rpm
      • Torque : 99 lb·ft (134 Nm) at 5,400 rpm
      • VTEC Switchover : depending on load, max ~3,500 rpm in 5th gear
      • Valvetrain : SOHC VTEC (3-4 valves per cylinder, depending on engine speed)
      • Fuel Control : OBD-2a PGM-FI MPFI
      • Ecu Code : P2Y
      • Head Code : P2J
      • Redline : 6,800 rpm
      • Fuel cutout : 7,200 rpm

D15Z7[edit]

  • 3-stage VTEC
  • Found in:
    • 1996–1999 Honda Civic VTi EK3 and Ferio Vi
      • Displacement : 1,493 cc (91.1 cu in)
      • Piston Code: P2J
      • Bore and Stroke : 75 mm × 84.5 mm (2.95 in × 3.33 in)
      • Rod Length : 137 mm
      • Rod/Stroke : 1.62
      • Compression : 9.6:1
      • Power : 128 hp (95.4 kW, 130 ps) at 7000 rpm
      • Torque : 102 lb·ft (14.2 kg/m, 139 Nm) at 5300 rpm
      • Valvetrain : SOHC VTEC (3-4 valves per cylinder, depending on engine speed)
      • VTEC Switchover : 2800 and 5800 rpm
      • Fuel Control : OBD-2 MPFI
      • ECU Code : P2J
      • Manual Transmission ECU Codes : P2J-003 (OBD2a), P2J-J11 (OBD2b)
      • CVT Transmission ECU Codes : P2J-J61 (OBD2a), P2J-J71 (OBD2b)
      • Lean burn capable.

D15Z8[edit]

  • VTEC-E
  • Found in:
    • 1997–2000 Honda Civic LS (MB3, MB9), (European Market)
      • Displacement : 1,493 cc (91.1 cu in)
      • Bore and Stroke : 75 mm × 84.5 mm (2.95 in × 3.33 in)
      • Rod Length : 137 mm
      • Deck Height : 207 mm
      • Compression : 9.6:1
      • Power : 114 hp (85.0 kW, 116 ps) at 6500 rpm
      • Torque : 95–99 lb·ft (13–14 kg/m, 128-134 Nm) :confirm? at 4500 rpm
      • Head Code : P2J P2M
      • ECU Code : P9L
      • VTEC Switchover : 4000 rpm
      • Valvetrain : SOHC VTEC-E, 4 valves per cylinder

D16 series engines (1.6 liter) [edit]

  • Bore and Stroke: 75.0 mm × 90.0 mm (2.95 in × 3.54 in)
  • Displacement: 1,590 cc (97 cu in)

D16A[edit]

  • Found in:
    • 1997-1999 JDM Honda Domani (MB4)[11]
      • Bore and Stroke: see D16 Series Engines
      • Displacement: see D16 Series Engines
      • Compression : 9.3:1
      • Power : 120 PS (88 kW; 118 hp) at 6400 rpm
      • Torque: 144 Nm
      • Redline : 7000 rpm
      • VTEC Engages : 5500 rpm
      • Valvetrain : SOHC (4 valves per cylinder)
      • Fuel Control : OBD2a
      • Head Code : P08
      • ECU Code: PBB-J61

D16A1[edit]

  • Found in:
    • 1986–89 Acura Integra (USA)
      • Bore and Stroke: see D16 Series Engines
      • Displacement: see D16 Series Engines
      • Valvetrain: DOHC 16-valve (four valves per cylinder)
      • Fuel Control :PGMFI
      • CG Gearbox – Cable Transmission
      • 1986–1987: USDM Browntop
        • Compression: 9.3:1
        • Power: 113 hp (84 kW; 115 PS) at 6250 rpm
        • Torque: 13.7 kg⋅m (134 N⋅m; 99 lb⋅ft) at 5500 rpm
        • Piston Code: PG6B
        • ECU Code: PG7, Vacuum Advance Distributor
      • 1988–1989: USDM Blacktop
        • Compression: 9.5: 1
        • Power: 118 hp (88 kW; 120 PS) at 6500 rpm
        • Torque: 14.2 kg⋅m (139 N⋅m; 103 lb⋅ft) at 5500 rpm
        • Piston Code: P29
        • ECU Code: PG7, Electronic Advance Distributor

D16A3[edit]

  • Found in:
    • 1986–89 Honda Integra (Australia)
      • Bore and Stroke: see D16 Series Engines
      • Displacement: see D16 Series Engines
      • Compression : 9.5:1
      • Power: 88 kW (120 PS; 118 hp) at 5600 rpm
      • Torque: 140 Nm (14.3 kgm, 103 lbft) at 4800 rpm
      • Valvetrain: DOHC 16-valve, four valves per cylinder
      • Fuel Control: OBD-0 MPFI

D16A6[edit]

Also known as D16Z2.

  • Found in:
    • 1988–1991 Honda Civic Si, CRX Si, 90-91 Civic EX (4dr), Civic Wagon RT4WD (USDM)
    • 1988–1995 Honda Civic Shuttle RT4WD (UK/Europe/Asia/AU/NZ)
    • 1989–1996 Rover 216/416 GSi/Tourer (UK/Europe)
      • Bore and Stroke: see D16 Series Engines
      • Displacement: see D16 Series Engines
      • Rod Length: 137 mm
      • Rod Ratio: 1.52~
      • Compression: 9.1:1
      • Power: 108 hp (80.5 kW, 110 ps) at 5600 rpm
        • Note: 1988 engines were 105 hp (78.3 kW, 107 ps)
      • Torque: 100 lb·ft (13.9 kg·m, 136 N·m) at 4800 rpm
      • Redline: 6500 rpm (USA)
      • Rev limited to: 7200 rpm
      • Valvetrain: SOHC (4 valves per cylinder)
      • Cam Gear: 38 tooth
      • Fuel Control: OBD-0 MPFI
      • Head Code: PM3
      • ECU Code: PM6

D16A7[edit]

(Basically a D16A6 without the catalytic converter)

  • Found in:
    • 1988–1991 Civic 1.6i (GTi) in New Zealand
    • 1988–1989 Civic models in Europe (ED4, ED7)
    • 1995 Civic models in New Zealand (EG4)
    • 1988–1995 Models in South Africa
    • 1994 Civic GTi (New Zealand)
    • Ballade SH4 and SR4 (EE4 )
      • Bore and Stroke: see D16 Series Engines
      • Displacement: see D16 Series Engines
      • Rod Length : 137 mm
      • Compression : 9.6:1
      • Power : 117 hp (87 kW; 119 PS) at 5900 rpm
      • Torque : 13.9 kg⋅m (136 N⋅m; 101 lb⋅ft) at 4800 rpm
      • Valvetrain : SOHC, four valves per cylinder
      • ECU: PM6 (OBD-0) / P27 (OBD-1)?
      • Fuel Control : OBD-0 Multi-point PGM-FI, OBD-1 (NZDM)

D16A8[edit]

  • Found in:
    • 1988–1995 Civic/CRX/Concerto (UK/Europe/Australia)
    • 1992–1995 Rover 216/416 GTi (UK/Europe)
    • 1993–1997 Rover 216 Sport Coupé (Europe)
      • Bore and Stroke: see D16 Series Engines
      • Displacement: see D16 Series Engines
      • Compression : 9.5:1
      • Power : 122 PS (90 kW; 120 hp) at 6800 rpm
      • Torque : 14.9 kg⋅m (146 N⋅m; 108 lb⋅ft) at 5900 rpm
      • Valvetrain : DOHC (4 valves per cylinder)
      • Fuel Control : OBD-0 and OBD-1 MPFI
      • ECU Code : PP5 (OBD-0), P29 (OBD-1)
      • Head Code : PM7
      • Gearbox : L3

D16A9[edit]

(Same as D16A8 but without a catalytic converter)

  • Found in:
    • 1988–1991 Concerto (UK/Europe)
    • 1988–1991 CRX 1.6i-16 (UK/Europe/South Africa)
    • 1990–1992 Ballade 160i-DOHC (South Africa)
    • 1988–1991 Civic 1.6i-16 (UK/Europe)
    • 1992–1993 Civic GTi (New Zealand)
    • 1989–1992 Rover 216/416 GTi (UK/Europe)
    • 1992–1995 Civic Si (Japanese, European and Peruvian version)
      • Bore and Stroke: see D16 Series Engines
      • Displacement: see D16 Series Engines
      • Compression : 9.5:1
      • Power : 125-129 hp (91.9-94.8 kW, 126-130 PS) at 6800 rpm
      • Torque : 105 lb·ft (14.5 kg/m, 143 Nm) at 5700 rpm
      • Valvetrain : DOHC 16 valve (4 valves per cylinder)
      • Redline: 7,200 rpm
      • Limit: 7,250 rpm
      • Fuel Cut: 7800 RPM (PM7)
      • Fuel Control : 88-91 OBD-0 MPFI (92-95 OBD-1)
      • ECU Code: (P29 OBD1)
      • Gearbox: non-LSD (1988-1991): L3, LSD (1992-1995): S20

D16B2[edit]

  • Found in:
    • 1998–2001 Honda Civic Aerodeck MC1 1.6i LS/ES/SR
    • 1997–2000 Rover 416 Si Automatic
      • Bore and Stroke: see D16 Series Engines
      • Displacement: see D16 Series Engines
      • Combustion Chamber Volume : 32.8 cc per cylinder
      • Power : 116 hp (85 kW)
      • Torque : 143 N⋅m (14.6 kg⋅m; 105 lb⋅ft) at ??? rpm
      • Valvetrain : SOHC 16 Valve
      • VTEC Switchover : Non-VTEC
      • Fuel Control : OBD2
      • ECU Code: ?

D16B5[edit]

(Largely identical to the D16Y5. The main differences are pistons, rods, camshaft, head gasket, intake manifold, and exhaust manifolds which are PDN rather than P2M)

  • Found in:
    • 1998–2000 Honda Civic GX
      • Bore and Stroke: see D16 Series Engines
      • Displacement: see D16 Series Engines
      • Rod Length : 137 mm
      • Compression : 12.5:1
      • Combustion Chamber Volume : 32.8 cc per cylinder
      • Power :
      • Torque :
      • Valvetrain : SOHC VTEC-E
      • VTEC Switchover :
      • Fuel Control : OBD-2 MPFI
      • ECU Code: PDN-A02

D16B6[edit]

Differences to the D16B7 (also in Accords) are unknown

  • Found in:
    • 1999 Honda Accord (CG7/CH5, Europe)
      • Bore and Stroke: see D16 Series Engines
      • Displacement: see D16 Series Engines
      • Power: 116 PS (85 kW) at 6400 rpm[12]
      • Torque: 140 N⋅m (14 kg⋅m) at 5100 rpm
      • Valvetrain: SOHC, four valves per cylinder
      • Fuel control: PGM-FI
      • Firing order 1,4-2,3
      • ECU code: ??

D16V1[edit]

  • VTEC (SOHC VTEC)
  • Found in:
    • 1999-2005 Honda Civic (European EM/EP2/EU8)[13]
      • Bore and Stroke: see D16 Series Engines
      • Displacement: see D16 Series Engines
      • Compression: 9.4:1
      • Power: 110 PS (81 kW) at 5600 rpm[14]
      • Torque: 152 N⋅m (112 lb⋅ft) at 4300 rpm[14]
      • Redline: 6250 rpm
      • Rev Limit: 6500 rpm
      • Valvetrain: SOHC, 4 valves per cylinder
      • Fuel control: Multi-point fuel injection, PGM-FI
      • Ignition timing: 8±2° BTDC at 700±50 rpm
      • Firing order: 1 - 3 - 4 - 2
      • ECU code: PMH

D16W1[edit]

  • non-VTEC
  • Found in:
    • 1999–2006 Honda HRV
      • Bore and Stroke: see D16 series engines
      • Displacement: see D16 series engines
      • Power: 105 PS (77 kW) at 6200 rpm[15]
      • Torque: 135 N⋅m (100 lb⋅ft) at 3400 rpm
      • Valvetrain: SOHC, four valves per cylinder
      • Fuel control: PGM-FI
      • ECU code :PEL

D16W3[edit]

  • non-VTEC
  • Found in:
    • 1998–2001 Honda Civic Aerodeck MC1 1.6i LS/SR

D16W4[edit]

  • VTEC
  • Found in:
    • 1999–2000 Honda Civic MB4 1.6i VTEC/ES
    • 1998–2001 Honda Civic Aerodeck MC1 1.6i VTEC/ES
      • Bore and Stroke: see D16 Series Engines
      • Displacement: see D16 Series Engines
      • Power : 126 hp (93 kW) at 6600 rpm
      • Valvetrain : SOHC (4 valves per cylinder)
      • Redline: 6800 rpm
      • Rev Limit: 7200 rpm
      • Piston Code: P2P
      • ECU Code: PDT
      • Fuel Control: OBD2-b
      • VTEC switchover: 5500 rpm
      • Torque: 106 lb⋅ft (144 N⋅m) at 5500 rpm
      • Compression: 9.6:1

D16W5[edit]

  • VTEC
  • Found in:
    • 2000–2006 Honda HRV
      • Bore and Stroke: see D16 Series Engines
      • Displacement: see D16 Series Engines
      • Power : 124 PS (91 kW; 122 hp)
      • Valvetrain : SOHC (4 valves per cylinder)
      • Fuel Control: OBD-2

D16W7[edit]

  • VTEC-E
  • Found in:
    • 2005–2007 Honda Civic VTi / VTi-L (Asia)
      • Bore and Stroke: see D16 Series Engines
      • Displacement: see D16 Series Engines
      • Compression: 10.9:1
      • Power: 117 PS (86 kW; 115 hp) at 5600 rpm
      • Torque: 112 lb·ft (15.5 kg/m, 152 Nm) at 4300 rpm
      • Valvetrain: SOHC, four valves per cylinder
      • Redline: 6100 rpm
      • Limit: 6200 rpm
      • Fuel Control: OBD-1 MPFI
      • ECU Code: PM12
    • Also found in 2001–2005 Honda Civic ES (Europe, Turkey, Singapore)
    • Same as above, except:
    • Power: 110 hp (82.0 kW, 81 kW) at 5600 rpm
    • Torque: 112 lb·ft (15.5 kg/m, 152 Nm) at 4300 rpm
    • Redline: 6100 rpm
    • Limit: 6200 rpm

D16W9[edit]

  • Found in :
    • 2001–2005 Honda Civic VTi (Philippines, Pakistan)
      • Bore and Stroke:
      • Displacement:1.6L, 1,590 cc (97 cu in)
      • Compression Ratio: 10.5:1
      • Power: 132 PS (97 kW; 130 hp) at 6600 rpm
      • Torque: 151 N⋅m (111 lb⋅ft) at 5500 rpm
      • Redline Limiter: 7200 rpm
      • Valvetrain: SOHC VTEC3 (4 valves per cylinder)
      • 1st VTEC Switchover: 2500 rpm
      • 2nd VTEC Switchover: 5500 rpm
      • Fuel Control: OBD2

D16Y1[edit]

  • Found in :
    • 1992–1995 Honda Civic VTi (AUS)
      • Bore and Stroke: see D16 Series Engines
      • Displacement: see D16 Series Engines
      • Compression: 9.3:1
      • Power: 129 hp (96 kW; 131 PS) at 6600 rpm
      • Torque: 145 N⋅m (107 lb⋅ft) at 5200 rpm
      • Redline: 7200 rpm
      • Valvetrain: SOHC VTEC (4 valves per cylinder)
      • VTEC Switchover: 5000 rpm
      • Fuel Control: OBD-1 MPFI
      • Head Code: P08
      • ECU Code: P28

D16Y2[edit]

  • Found in :
    • 1995–1997 Honda Civic MB1 SR
      • Bore and Stroke: see D16 Series Engines
      • Displacement: see D16 Series Engines
      • Compression: 9.5:1
      • Power: 126 hp (94 kW) at 6500 rpm
      • Torque: 106 lb·ft (14.8 kg/m, 144 Nm) at 5200 rpm
      • Valvetrain: SOHC VTEC (four valves per cylinder)
      • Cylinder Head: P08
      • VTEC Switchover: 5500 rpm
      • Fuel Control: OBD-1 MPFI
      • ECU Code: P1H
      • Transmission: S20

D16Y3[edit]

  • Found in :
    • 1995–1997 Honda Civic MB1 LS (UK/Europe)
    • 1996–1997 Rover 416 SLI Auto (UK/Europe)
      • Bore and Stroke: see D16 Series Engines
      • Displacement: see D16 Series Engines
      • Compression: 9.4:1
      • Power: 83 kW (113 PS; 111 hp) at 5600 rpm
      • Torque: 140 N⋅m (103 lb⋅ft) at 5100 rpm
      • Redline: 7200 rpm
      • Valvetrain: SOHC (four valves per cylinder)
      • Fuel Control: OBD-1 MPFI

The camshaft is the same as D16A6

D16Y4[edit]

  • Found in:
    • 1998–2000 Civic 1.6 iES (Turkey)
    • 1996–2000 Civic CXi, GL, GLi (New Zealand, Australia)
      • Bore and Stroke: see D16 Series Engines
      • Displacement: see D16 Series Engines
      • Compression: 9.4:1
      • Power: 120 PS (88 kW) at 6400 rpm
      • Torque: 144 N⋅m (106 lb⋅ft) at 5000 rpm
      • Redline: 6800 rpm
      • Rev-limiter: 7200 rpm
      • Fuel Control: OBD-2 MPFI
      • Head Code: P2A-2
      • ECU Code: P2K
      • Rod /Stroke Ratio: 1.52
      • Rod Length: 137 mm
      • Deck Height: 212

D16Y5[edit]

  • VTEC-E
  • Found in :
    • 1996–2000 Honda Civic HX
    • 1996 Honda Civic EX (sedan Peruvian version)
      • Bore and Stroke: see D16 Series Engines
      • Displacement: see D16 Series Engines
      • Rod Length: 137 mm
      • Rod/Stroke: 1.52
      • Compression: 9.4:1
      • Power: 115 hp (86 kW; 117 PS) at 5600 rpm
      • Torque: 104 lb⋅ft (141 N⋅m) at 4500 rpm
      • Valvetrain: SOHC VTEC-E (4 valves per cylinder)
      • Fuel Control: OBD-2 MPFI
      • Head Code: P2J
    • 1996–2000 Honda Civic VTI sedan (Australia)[16]
      • Bore and Stroke: see D16 Series Engines
      • Displacement: see D16 Series Engines
      • Compression: ?:?
      • Power: 88 kW (120 PS) at 5800 rpm
      • Torque: 145 N⋅m (107 lb⋅ft) at ??? rpm
      • Valvetrain: SOHC VTEC-E (4 valves per cylinder)
      • Fuel Control: OBD-2 MPFI
      • Head Code: P2J
      • ECU Code: P2N
      • Piston Code : P2MY

Redline : 7200

D16Y7[edit]

  • Found in:
    • 1996–2000 Honda Civic DX/VP/LX/CX
    • 1998–2000 Honda Civic Special Edition – SE/EX (Canada)
    • 1996–1997 Honda Del Sol S
    • 1996–1997 Honda Civic Coupé LSI
      • Bore and Stroke: see D16 Series Engines
      • Displacement: see D16 Series Engines
      • Compression: 9.4:1
      • Power: 106 hp (79 kW; 107 PS) at 6200 rpm
      • Torque: 103 lb·ft (140 N.m) at 4600 rpm
      • Redline: 6800 rpm
      • Rev-limiter: 7200 rpm
      • Valvetrain: SOHC (4 valves per cylinder)
      • Fuel Control: OBD2 MPFI
      • Head Code: P2A-2
      • Piston Code: P2E
      • ECU Code: P2E

D16Y8[edit]

1.6 litre 16-Valve, SOHC VTEC Also available in New Zealand and Pakistan under the code D16Y6

  • Found in:
    • 1996–1997 Honda Del Sol Si (US)
    • 1996–2000 Honda Civic EX (US, UK)
    • 1996-1998 Honda Civic Coupe (UK)
    • 1996–2000 Honda Civic Si (Canada)
    • 1997-2000 Acura 1.6 EL (Canada)
      • Bore and Stroke: see D16 Series Engines
      • Displacement: see D16 Series Engines
      • Redline: 6800 rpm
      • Rev Limit: 7200 rpm
      • ECU Code: P2P
      • Piston Code: P2P
      • Fuel Control: OBD2-b
      • VTEC switchover: 5,600 rpm
      • Power: 127 hp (95 kW) at 6600 rpm
      • Torque: 107 lb⋅ft (145 N⋅m) at 5500 rpm
      • Compression: 9.6:1
      • Deck Height: 8.347 inches
      • Rod Length: 5.394 inches
      • Curb weights:
        • 96-98 coupé (MT/AT): 1,116 or 1,132 kg (2,460 or 2,496 lb)
        • 99-00 coupé (MT/AT): 1,140 or 1,161 kg (2,513 or 2,560 lb)
        • 96-98 sedan (MT/AT): 1,142 or 1,165 kg (2,518 or 2,568 lb)
        • 99-00 sedan (MT/AT): 1,140 or 1,162 kg (2,513 or 2,562 lb)

D16Y9[edit]

equal to D16Y4 non VTEC

  • Found in:
    • 1996–2000 Honda Ballade/Civic in South Africa and Venezuela
      • Bore and Stroke: see D16 Series Engines
      • Displacement: see D16 Series Engines
      • Power: 79 kW (107.4 PS; 105.9 hp) at 5900 rpm (AT: 110 hp (82.0 kW; 111.5 PS) at 5500 rpm)
      • Torque: 108 lb·ft (14.9 kg/m, 146 Nm) at 4000 rpm
      • Valvetrain: SOHC (4 valves per cylinder)
      • Fuel Control: OBD2A MPFI
      • Redline: 7200 rpm
      • Rev-limiter: 7400 rpm
      • Valvetrain: SOHC (4 valves per cylinder)
      • Head Code: P2A-9
      • Piston Code: P2K
      • ECU Code: P2K 2 connectors
    • The D16Y9 in South Africa has different power figures:
      • Power: 89 kW (119 hp) at 6400 rpm
      • Torque: 146 Nm (108 lbf-ft) at 5500 rpm
        • Information found in April 1998 CAR Magazine (SA)

D16Z5[edit]

(Basically the same engine as the D16A9, but now with a catalytic converter and lambda sensor)

  • Found in:
    • September 1989 – 1992 Honda CRX (European market)
      • Bore and Stroke: see D16 Series Engines
      • Displacement: see D16 Series Engines
      • Compression: 9.5:1
      • Power: 124 PS (91 kW; 122 hp) at 6800 rpm[17]
      • Torque: 14.3 kg⋅m (140 N⋅m; 103 lb⋅ft) at 5700 rpm[17]
      • Valvetrain: DOHC, four valves per cylinder
      • Cam Gear: 34 tooth
      • Fuel Control: OBD-0 PGM-FI
      • Head Code: P7
      • Piston Code: PM7
      • ECU Code: PM7
      • Clutch Kit: 210 mm disk

D16Z6[edit]

VTEC

  • Found in
    • 1992–1995 Honda Civic Si
    • 1992–1995 Honda Civic EX, EX-V
    • 1992–1995 Honda Civic ESi (European Market)
    • 1993–1995 Honda Del Sol Si (US)
    • 1993–1996 Honda Del Sol ESi (European)
      • Bore and Stroke: see D16 Series Engines
      • Displacement: see D16 Series Engines
      • Rod Length: 137 mm
      • Rod Ratio: 1.52~
      • Compression: 9.2:1
      • Power: 125 bhp (92 kW, 125 PS) at 6600 rpm
      • Torque: 106 lb·ft (14.7 kg/m, 144 Nm) at 5200 rpm
      • Volumetric Efficiency: 87.68%
      • Redline: 7200 rpm
      • Fuel cut: over 7400 rpm
      • VTEC switchover: 4800 rpm
      • Fuel control: OBD-1 PGM-FI
      • Head code: P08
      • ECU code: P28

D16Z7[edit]

VTEC

  • Found in
    • 1996–2000 Honda Civic EX Coupé
      • Bore and Stroke: see D16 Series Engines
      • Displacement: see D16 Series Engines
      • Rod Length: 137 mm
      • Rod Ratio: 1.52~
      • Compression: 9.6:1
      • Power: 127 bhp at 6600 rpm
      • Torque: 107 lb·ft at 5500 rpm
      • Redline: 7200 rpm

D16Z9[edit]

VTEC

  • Found in:
    • 1994–1995 Civic Coupé (EJ1) 1.6i ESi European
    • 1994–1995 Civic Sedan (EH5) 1.6i EX US
      • Bore and Stroke: see D16 Series Engines
      • Displacement: see D16 Series Engines
      • Compression: 9.3:1
      • Power: 130 hp (95.6 kW, 129,2 PS) at 6600 rpm
      • Torque: 106 lbf (144 Nm) at 5200 rpm
      • VTEC switchover: 4,800 rpm
      • Redline: 7200 rpm
      • Fuel cut: 7500 rpm
      • Valvetrain: SOHC VTEC (4 valves per cylinder)
      • Fuel control: OBD-1 MPFI
      • ECU code: P28

ZC[edit]

A Honda non-VTEC SOHC ZC 1.6 engine in a 1996 third generation (DC1) JDM Integra.

A few D-series variants are labelled (Japanese: Honda ZC engine) (usually JDM), but they are not truly a different series. They are similar to the D16Y4, D16A8, D16Z6, D16A1, D16A3, D16A6, D16A9 and D16Z5 engines.

There are both SOHC and DOHC ZC engines. The non-VTEC SOHC ZC is similar to the D16A6 ('91–'96) and D16Y4 ('96–2000) engine, but with more aggressive cam timing. The SOHC VTEC ZC is similar to the D16Z6 ('91–'96). The DOHC ZC is similar to the D16A1, D16A3, D16A8, D16A9 and D16Z5 engines.

SOHC ZC VTEC[edit]

VTEC

  • Found in
    • 1991–1993 Honda Civic Ferio EJ3 (JDM)
    • 1992–1995 Honda Civic EJ1 (JDM)
    • 1992–1995 Honda Domani MA4 (JDM)
      • Displacement : 1590 cc (97 cu in)
      • Bore and Stroke : 75 mm × 90 mm (3.0 in × 3.5 in)
      • Rod Length : 137MM
      • Rod/Stroke : 1.52
      • Compression : 9.2:1
      • Power : 130 PS (96 kW; 128 hp) at 6600 rpm
      • Torque : 14.8 kg⋅m (145 N⋅m; 107 lb⋅ft) at 5200 rpm
      • Redline : 7200 rpm
      • Fuel Cut : 7300 rpm
      • VTEC Switchover : 5500 rpm
      • Fuel Control : OBD-1 MPFI
      • ECU Code : P70 (Domani), P91 (Civic Coupé), P29

DOHC ZC[edit]

Non-VTEC

  • Found in (JDM)
    • 1984–1987 Honda Ballade CRX AS
    • 1984–1987 Honda Civic AT
    • 1985–1987 Honda Integra AV/DA1 (Lower trim packages equipped with Single Carburetor)
    • 1986–1991 Honda CRX EF7
    • 1992–1995 Honda Civic EH1
      • Displacement : 1590 cc
      • Bore and Stroke : 75 mm X 90 mm
      • 1984–1987 Compression : 9.3:1 1988–1989 Compression : 9.5: 1
      • Single Carburetor : 100 PS (73.5 kW) at 6800 rpm; Torque : 92 lb·ft (12.8 kg/m, 126 Nm) at 5500 rpm
      • 1984–1987 Power : 115 PS (85 kW) at 6250 rpm; Torque : 99 lb·ft (13.7 kg/m, 134 Nm) at 5500 rpm
      • 1988–1989 Power : 120 PS (88 kW) at 6500 rpm; Torque : 103 lb·ft (14.0 kg/m, 137 Nm) at 5500 rpm
      • 1988–1991 Power : 130 PS (96 kW) at 6800 rpm; Torque : 106 lb·ft (14.7 kg/m, 144 Nm) at 5700 rpm
      • Valvetrain : DOHC
      • Piston Code 1986-'87 : PG6
      • Piston Code 1988-'89 : PM7
      • Fuel Control : OBD-0 MPFI

Euro Mk1 ('85-'87) 1.6 CRX's are fitted with an engine designated "ZC1" which is a higher spec 125 PS (92 kW) version of the D16A1. These were later replaced by the D16A8 or B16A, depending on the specs.

1st Gen ZC Identified by: External coil, small distributor, dual butterfly TB, cam cover bolts on top, brown/gold cam cover. Large cam pulleys. +3cc PG6B pistons, non-pent roof combustion chamber. As a ZC it appeared in JDM AV Integra Si and JDM E-AT Civic/CR-X Si. Commonly produced at the time but now over twenty years old and getting harder to find. D-series version is called D16A1, 1986–1987.

2nd Gen ZC (rarest) Identified by: Internal coil, large distributor, single butterfly TB mounted on slight angle forward, bolts on top of cam cover, black cam cover, large cam pulleys. +7cc PM7 pistons, 43 cc Pent roof combustion chamber. As a ZC appeared in JDM facelift AV bodied Integra Si did not appear in Civic or CR-X, rarest ZC only produced for less than one year. D-series version D16A1 '88-'89 (sometimes +7cc P29 pistons)

3rd Gen ZC Identified by: Internal coil, large distributor, single butterfly TB. Black cam cover. Cam cover bolts on the sides. Small cam pulleys. Inlet Manifold stamped PM7. +7cc PM7 pistons, 43 cc Pent roof combustion chamber. As a "ZC" this appeared in the JDM EF3 Civic and EF7 CR-X, and also in the JDM Honda Quint Integra GSi (DA1 chassis). This is the most commonly produced ZC, manufactured in Japan from end of '87 through to early '91 D-series version D16A8/9 (Euro Civic Si) (sometimes +7cc P29 pistons)

4th Gen ZC Identified by: Internal coil. OBD1 EFi system (grey plug). No cam angle sensor on exhaust cam, now located in distributor. Rubber plug where cam angle sensor would mount. Black cam cover. No PGM-EFi plate on the inlet manifold, replaced with three ribs instead. P29 stamped on inlet manifold. MAP sensor on TB. +7cc PM7 pistons, pent roof combustion chamber. As a ZC only appeared in EG5 Civic bodies, no Integra or CRX received this engine. Reasonably common produced from '92 to '94. (20th Anniversary edition & Japanese car of the year) D-series version D16A8/9 (Euro & Australia Civic Si) (sometimes +7cc P29 pistons) Hond

D17 series engines (1.7 liter)[edit]

D17A[edit]

  • Found in:
    • 2001–2005 Honda Civic (Japan)
      • Displacement : 1,668 cc (101.8 cu in)
      • Bore and Stroke: 75 × 94.4 mm (3.0 × 3.72 in)
      • Compression : 10.5:1
      • Power : (lean burn) 120 hp (85.8 kW, 120 ps) at 4900 rpm; 140 hp (96.9 kW, 140 PS) at 6750 rpm
      • Torque : 160 N⋅m (118 lb⋅ft) at 4800 rpm
      • Rev-limiter : 7200 rpm
      • Valvetrain : SOHC (4 valves per cylinder)
      • Fuel Control : OBD-2 MPFI

ECU 37820 PLR J01-13 (manual transmission)

D17A1[edit]

  • Found in:
    • 2001–2005 Honda Civic DX/LX/VP
      • Displacement : 1,668 cc (101.8 cu in)
      • Bore and Stroke : 75 mm × 94.4 mm (2.95 in × 3.72 in)
      • Compression : 9.5:1
      • Power : 115 hp (85.8 kW, 117 ps) at 6100 rpm
      • Torque : 110 lb·ft (15.2 kg/m, 149 Nm) at 4500 rpm
      • RPM redline: 6750 rpm
      • Rev-limiter : 7200 rpm
      • Valvetrain : SOHC (4 valves per cylinder)
      • Fuel Control : OBD-2 MPFI

D17A2[edit]

  • SOHC VTEC-E
  • Found in:
    • 2001–2005 Honda Civic EX (US only)
    • 2001–2005 Honda Civic LX (Europe)
    • 2001–2005 Honda Civic Si (Canada only)
    • 2001–2005 Acura 1.7 EL (Canada only)
    • 2000–2007 Honda Stream 1.7 (Japan)
    • 2004-2007 Honda FR-V 1.7 (Europe)
      • Displacement: 1,668 cc (101.8 cu in)
      • Bore and Stroke: 75 mm × 94.4 mm (2.95 in × 3.72 in)
      • Rod Length: 137 mm
      • Rod/Stroke: 1.48
      • Compression: 9.9:1
      • Power (North America): 127 hp (95 kW; 129 PS) at 6,300 rpm
        Japan: 125 PS (92 kW; 123 hp) at 6,300 rpm[18]
      • Torque (North America): 114 lb·ft (15.8 kg/m, 154 Nm) at 4,800 rpm[19]
        Japan: 154 N⋅m (114 lb⋅ft) at 4,800 rpm[18]
      • RPM redline: 6,800 rpm
      • Rev-limiter: 7,200 rpm
      • Valvetrain: SOHC VTEC, four valves per cylinder
      • VTEC Switchover: 3,200 rpm
      • Fuel Control: OBD-2 MPFI

D17A5[edit]

  • VTEC-E
  • Found in:
    • 2001–2005 Honda Civic 170i VTEC (South Africa)
    • 2004 Honda Stream VTEC (Indonesia)
      • Displacement : 1,668 cc (101.8 cu in)
      • Bore and Stroke : 75 mm × 94.4 mm (2.95 in × 3.72 in)
      • Compression : 9.9:1
      • Power : 130 hp (97 kW; 132 PS) at 6,300 rpm
      • Torque : 155 N⋅m (114 lb⋅ft) at 4,800 rpm
      • Valvetrain : SOHC VTEC-E Lean Burn (4 valves per cylinder)
      • VTEC Switchover : 3,200 rpm
      • Fuel Control : OBD-2 MPFI

D17A6[edit]

  • VTEC-E
  • Found in:
    • 2001–2005 Honda Civic HX
      • Displacement : 1,668 cc (101.8 cu in)
      • Bore and Stroke : 75 mm × 94.4 mm (2.95 in × 3.72 in)
      • Compression : 9.9:1
      • Power : 117 hp (87 kW; 119 PS) at 6,100 rpm[20]
      • Torque : 111 lb⋅ft (150 N⋅m) at 4,500 rpm[20]
      • Valvetrain : SOHC VTEC-E Lean Burn (4 valves per cylinder)
      • VTEC Switchover : 2,300 rpm
      • Fuel Control : OBD-2 MPFI

D17A7[edit]

  • Found in:
    • 2001–2005 Honda Civic GX
    • Fuel CNG (Compressed Natural Gas)
      • Displacement : 1,668 cc (101.8 cu in)
      • Bore and Stroke : 75 mm × 94.4 mm (2.95 in × 3.72 in)
      • Compression : 12.5:1
      • Power : 100 hp (75 kW; 101 PS) at 6,100 rpm
      • Torque : 98 lb·ft (13.5 kg/m, 133 Nm) at 4,000 rpm
      • Valvetrain : SOHC (4 valves per cylinder)
      • Fuel Control : OBD-2 MPFI

D17A8[edit]

  • Found in:
    • 2001-2005 Honda Civic Coupé LS (Europe)
      • Displacement : 1,668 cc (101.8 cu in)
      • Bore and Stroke : 75 mm × 94.4 mm (2.95 in × 3.72 in)
      • Compression : 9.9:1[21]
      • Power : 85.8 kW (117 PS; 115 hp) at 6100 rpm[22]
      • Torque : 110 lb·ft (15.2 kg/m, 149 Nm) at 4500 rpm[22]
      • RPM redline : 6750 rpm
      • Rev-limiter : 7200 rpm
      • Valvetrain : SOHC (4 valves per cylinder)
      • Fuel Control : OBD-2 MPFI

D17A9[edit]

  • VTEC-E
  • Found in:
    • 2001–2005 Honda Civic Coupe ES (Europe)
      • Displacement : 1,668 cc (101.8 cu in)
      • Bore and Stroke : 75 mm × 94.4 mm (2.95 in × 3.72 in)
      • Rod Length : 140 mm
      • Rod/Stroke : 1.48
      • Compression : 9.9:1[21]
      • Power : 125 PS (92 kW; 123 hp) at 6,300 rpm[22]
      • Torque : 145 N⋅m (107 lb⋅ft) at 4,800 rpm[22]
      • RPM redline: 6,800 rpm
      • Rev-limiter: 7,200 rpm
      • Valvetrain: SOHC VTEC-E, four valves per cylinder
      • VTEC Switchover: 2,500 - 3,200 rpm
      • Fuel Control: OBD-2 MPFI

D17Z3[edit]

  • VTEC
  • Found in:
    • 2001–2006 Honda Civic EX (Brazil only)
    • 2005–2006 Honda Civic LXL (Brazil only)
      • Displacement: 1,668 cc (101.8 cu in)
      • Bore and Stroke: 75 mm × 94.4 mm (2.95 in × 3.72 in)
      • Rod Length: 140 mm
      • Rod/Stroke: 1.48
      • Compression: 9.9:1
      • Power: 130 hp (97 kW; 132 PS) at 6,300 rpm
        [18]
      • Torque: 114 lb·ft (15.8 kg/m, 154 Nm) at 4,800 rpm[19]
        Japan: 154 N⋅m (114 lb⋅ft) at 4,800 rpm[18]
      • RPM redline: 6,800 rpm
      • Rev-limiter: 7,000 rpm
      • Valvetrain: SOHC VTEC, four valves per cylinder
      • VTEC Switchover: 4,800 rpm
      • Fuel Control: OBD-2 MPFI

D17Z2[edit]

  • SOHC
  • Found in:
    • 2001–2006 Honda Civic LX (Brazil only)
    • 2004 Honda Civic LXL (Brazil only)
      • Displacement: 1,668 cc (101.8 cu in)
      • Bore and Stroke: 75 mm × 94.4 mm (2.95 in × 3.72 in)
      • Rod Length: 140 mm
      • Rod/Stroke: 1.48
      • Compression: 9.9:1
      • Power: 115 hp (86 kW; 117 PS) at 6,300 rpm
        [18]
      • Torque: 114 lb·ft (15.8 kg/m, 154 Nm) at 4,800 rpm[19]
        Japan: 154 N⋅m (114 lb⋅ft) at 4,800 rpm[18]
      • RPM redline: 6,800 rpm
      • Rev-limiter: 7,000 rpm
      • Valvetrain: SOHC, four valves per cylinder
      • Fuel Control: OBD-2 MPFI

References[edit]

  • Büschi, Hans-Ulrich, ed. (6 March 1997). Automobil Revue 1997 (in German and French). 92. Berne, Switzerland: Hallwag AG. ISBN .
  1. ^ abBüschi, Hans-Ulrich, ed. (10 March 1994). Automobil Revue 1994 (in German and French). 89. Berne, Switzerland: Hallwag AG. p. 296. ISBN .
  2. ^ abAutomobil Revue 1997, p. 291
  3. ^ abAutomobil Revue 1997, p. 292
  4. ^Mastrostefano, Raffaele, ed. (1990). Quattroruote: Tutte le Auto del Mondo 1990 (in Italian). Milano: Editoriale Domus S.p.A. pp. 344, 351.
  5. ^Tutte le Auto del Mondo 1990, p. 353
  6. ^ abcdefÅhman, Michael, ed. (1999). Bilkatalogen 2000 (Swedish edition of German Auto Katalog) (in Swedish). Solna, Sweden: Auto Motor & Sport Sverige AB. pp. 202–203.
  7. ^ abAutomobil Revue 1997, p. 293
  8. ^"Honda Civic Ferio 1997: Modification Vi". Auto.vl.ru. Archived from the original on 2012-04-05.
  9. ^ ab"D15B1 (1.5 benzín Přímé vstřikování, OHC, 52 kW, 112 Nm) - Detail Motoru" (in Czech). Honda klub.
  10. ^Automobil Revue 1994, p. 295
  11. ^"Honda Domani 1997: Modification 16G". auto.vl.ru. Archived from the original on 2012-04-05.
  12. ^Nötzli, Max, ed. (7 March 2002). Automobil Revue 2002 (in German and French). 97. Berne, Switzerland: Büchler Grafino AG. p. 302. ISBN .
  13. ^"Engine Honda D16V1". FindPart.org. Archived from the original on 2013-09-21.
  14. ^ abAutomobil Revue 2002, p. 299
  15. ^Automobil Revue 2002, p. 309
  16. ^"1998 Honda Civic VTi Pricing and Spec Configurations". Carsguide.com.au. Cox Automotive. Archived from the original on 2020-04-18.
  17. ^ abTutte le Auto del Mondo 1990, p. 352
  18. ^ abcdefAutomobil Revue 2002, p. 300
  19. ^ abc"2001 Honda Civic Sedan Specifications (News Release)". American Honda Motor Company. 2000-09-15. Retrieved 2012-01-30.
  20. ^ ab"2001 Honda Civic Coupé Specifications (News Release)". American Honda Motor Company. 2000-09-15. Retrieved 2012-01-30.
  21. ^ abHonda Civic Coupe Owner's Manual
  22. ^ abcdHonda Certificate of Conformity

External links[edit]

Sours: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Honda_D_engine
Skunk2 Pro Series Intake Manifold and Alpha 70mm TB for D15 / D16 Install Review And Before - After

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