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Army Reserve – Adventure! Opportunities to travel and train around your job! Gain skills and qualifications!

  • We have established a process to help GP trainees in the Army Reserve fulfil the majority of their mandatory training days without having to arrange rota swaps or ask for special leave

  • The Ipswich and Colchester Hospitals are keen to support up to 6 GP trainees as part of this programme and Kings Lynn Hospital are keen to support up to 4 GP trainees. All the organisations involved with this initiative either have, or are working towards, silver sabre status

  • The training programmes will include hospital posts that will give you experience relevant to your army work as well. Typically this would include Acute Medicine, A&E and Psychiatry/Obstetrics & Gynaecology/Paediatrics

  • These hospitals (or general practices) will guarantee your release to attend the annual 2 week camp as part of your annual study leave allowance

  • HEE, working across the East of England, have agreed to allow an exceptional further 5 working days of study leave so that you can attend a relevant army course. And the hospitals/general practices will again guarantee your release to attend this course

  • The Defence Deanery have agreed to reserve up to 4 places for Army reserve GP trainees on the annual Highlands and Islands courses which are geared towards the needs of GP trainees with a differing emphasis in each training year

  • During your general practice placements, the work you do delivering health care in army settings can count towards 20% of the overall hours you need to complete in out of hours work

  • We will look favourably on OOPE requests to accommodate deployments or other extended time periods spent on army work

  • We hope to develop this offer further in future years by setting up a Military Fellow year and looking at the posts offered in the programme

What are the benefits of joining the Reserves?

  • Paid for your time, receive a tax-free bounty and pension contributions

  • An allowance paid for annual leave

  • Service discounts including Forces Rail Card scheme

  • Opportunites to train overseas

  • Sports and adventure training

  • Training and qualifications

    All we ask from you is that you enjoy living, working and training in the East of England, that you record your learning from your Army activities on your eportfolio and that you share that learning with other GP trainees in your area.

Who do I contact for more information?

To register your interest please contact Hilary Foster at HEE EoE.

For further information on the Army Reserve please look at their website

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Friday, 21 August, 2020

Sours: https://heeoe.hee.nhs.uk/general_practice/gp-trainees-army-reserve

Army Reserve doctor looks back at Camp Arifjan tour, vaccines, ambassador's thanks

CAMP ARIFJAN, Kuwait--The command surgeon for the 1st Theater Sustainment Command's operational command post here said he is wrapping up this his fifth overseas deployment happy with his team and their work.

"I really found a great group of people, who were motivated to serve the country, and to do great things," said Army Reserve Lt. Col. Frank Vazzana, who deployed here with the Indianapolis-based 310th Sustainment Command (Expeditionary), whose Soldiers staff the 1st TSC-OCP.

Typically, reserve component physicians deploy for 90 days, but Vazzana said he will have been mobilized for roughly 135 days because of the responsibilities of his position. His previous deployments since 2013 were to the same job here, as well as to Qatar, Bahrain, Jordan, Iraq, and Afghanistan.

"I was not organic to the 310th. I am from a combat support hospital in St. Petersburg, Florida," the colonel said. "I was assigned to the 310th in July 2020, and I intend to remain with the 310th, so I will be organic," the Belleair, Florida, resident said. "I think the leadership here is cohesive--we have a great team--and I am hoping to stay with them to do great things for the Army."

Vazzana said his civilian medical work as a hospitalist back home is not similar to his work here at all.

"On the civilian side, I am a hospital provider, a physician providing care for a geriatric population," he said. "I take care of people from the time they get to the hospital, when I admit them. I consult as necessary. I discharge them back to the primary care provider in their community."

Looking back on his tour, vaccine roll out

Vazzana said he is pleased the Soldiers and other military and civilian personnel received excellent medical care here from 3rd Medical Command (Deployment Support), deployed from Forest Park, Georgia.
3rd MED is responsible for medical services in the U.S. Central Command footprint. The unit also oversees the 228th Combat Support Hospital, from Joint Base San Antonio, Texas, whose Soldiers operate the Troop Medical Clinic.

"They are doing a phenomenal job," he said. "They've initiated a highly-intensive management program for behavioral health patients. They have also rendered care at the Troop Medical Clinic--excellent care as far as every metric I have seen."

There have been challenges, he said.

"We did have a brief time when the providers were not coming to theater due to paperwork issues," the colonel said.

"In order to support them, I covered down and for nine days. I was a medical provider there rendering care at the Troop Medical Clinic, so that care could continue," he said.

Another highlight of his tour was the rollout of the COVID-19 vaccinations in theater.

"I think it was a slow start--in my opinion, not the Army's," he said.

"But, once we vetted all the possible errors that could occur, transport and cold storage capabilities--once that greenlight was a go, we've done a tremendous amount of vaccinations," he said.

"By the end of April, everyone who has their hand up and wants a vaccine in CENTCOM will be able to have that vaccine," he said.

Vazzana, others recognized by U.S. ambassador to Kuwait.

In the first days of the colonel's time in Kuwait, he and two members of his team, Army Reserve 1st Lt. Mitchell Mackesey, the command medical operations officer, and Army Reserve Staff Sgt. Justin McKay, command's senior medic, responded to a terrible incident on a local highway.

"We were tasked to come down from base to another within Kuwait," he said. "I was in the back seat we came to a sudden stop, because a gentleman was hit by a car next to us--we were going 120 kilometers an hour, the rest of the traffic was going around 150--That person flew 40, 45 feet in the air, landed directly in front of us, and we immediately stopped." 120 KPH is roughly the same as 75 miles per hour and 150 KPH is roughly the same as 93 mph.

McKay, the driver, executed a short stop to avoid hitting the man in front of them, he said.

"We ran out to render aid and the man would have certainly died on the spot, if we were not there," Vazzana said. "We sustained life while we were there, and we were there for approximately 27 minutes." The man eventually succumbed to his injuries.

U.S. Ambassador to Kuwait Alina L. Romanowski recognized the three men at a Feb. 18 ceremony at the embassy, attended by Army Reserve Brig. Gen. Justin Swanson, the commanding general of the 310th ESC, and Army Reserve Command Sgt. Maj. Keith Gwin, also with the 310th.

"I would like to use this as an example of our values—the important values that we hold—for human beings and for what goes on in the world," said the ambassador at the ceremony.

"Thank you for what you did: it is part of your nature, it is part of your profession, it is part of your training," she said.

"It shouldn’t have to be Americans in uniform and doctors trained—it should be a part of humanity."

Date Taken:04.07.2021
Date Posted:04.07.2021 03:25
Story ID:393208
Location:KW

Web Views:334
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Sours: https://www.dvidshub.net/news/393208/army-reserve-doctor-looks-back-camp-arifjan-tour-vaccines-ambassadors-thanks
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Doctor

Army Medical Service

This is available as a full time Army role.

This is available as a part time Army role.

Back to role results

"THE BEST ASPECT OF THE GENERAL DUTIES MEDICAL OFFICER LIFESTYLE IS THE VARIETY"

Treating casualties on the front line. Caring for soldiers in barracks. Providing medical cover at Army sports events – there’s no doubt that life as an Army Doctor is varied. You’re likely to spend the first few years as a Regimental Medical Officer (RMO) with a combat unit or as a General Duties Medical Officer (GDMO) with a medical regiment. You’ll get outstanding training to prepare you for the injuries and illnesses you'll encounter in military life. There’ll be the chance to get new qualifications, have valuable experiences, and take part in sports and adventurous training. It’s like no civilian role out there.
  • Provide front line medical support at every level of care.
  • Work in challenging and hostile environments.
  • Build and maintain your clinical skills in NHS hospitals.
  • Enjoy opportunities for postgraduate training.
  • Enjoy a wide range of sports and an excellent social life.

 

Step 1
Having successfully completed the Army Officer Selection process and Army Doctor interview; you will be awarded a place on the Commissioning Course Short at the Royal Military Academy Sandhurst. You are taught basic military, survival and weapon handling skills alongside other professionally-qualified officers. The training is designed to prepare you for military life. On completion of the course you will awarded a commission into the Army Medical Services.

Step 2
You will then attend the Army Medical Services Entry Officers' Course (EOC), which provides you with the specific knowledge required to begin your career as an Army Doctor.

STUDENT - Following graduation, you will be required to complete foundation years 1 and 2 training at one of the Defence Medical Group Units (Frimley Park, Northallerton, Portsmouth, Plymouth or the Queen Elizabeth Hospital Birmingham).

Age: 17 years 9 months - 36 years 11 months

Qualifications:

Degree in Medicine. Full registration with the UK General Medical Council (GMC), you could also be at the point of completing your medical training. Age criteria differ (up to a maximum of 55 years) depending on qualifications and experience. Please give us a call to find out which specialties we are currently recruiting and the specific criteria.

Student bursary - For those studying towards a Degree in Medicine on a course that will result in full registration with the UK General Medical Council (GMC). Apply while you are still at university, before the end of January. You should apply not later than your first year to qualify for the full amount; the Army reserves the right to award bursaries of 1,2 or 3 years. You must pass the Army Officer Selection Board for professionally qualified officers and the Arm Selection Board for the Royal Army Medical Corps to qualify. You must also start initial Officer training at Sandhurst before your 37th birthday, unless a medical specialist.

An Army doctor who undertakes specialist training in general practice or a hospital speciality must fulfil Royal College requirements to be awarded the Certificate of Completion of Specialist Training.

Specialists can apply up to the age of 55
Fitness:
  • Mid Thigh Pull 50kg
  • Medicine Ball Throw 2.7m
  • 2km run 11m 30s
  • MSFT (beep test) level 6.6
More information about the fitness test

Medical qualifications dependent on your specialism (GP, Emergency Medicine, Anaesthetics and Resuscitation, General Surgery, General Medicine, Psychiatry, Pathology, Radiology, Rheumatology and Rehabilitation, Occupational Medicine or Public Health).

 Learn about rank progression here.

Once you have completed your military training, you will be on a minimum salary of £58,113. This will go up once you're fully qualified.

Student bursary (up to £75,000):

  • Open to candidates who will graduate with an Army-endorsed medical degree and intend to join the Royal Army Medical Corps for a minimum period of 4 years as a commissioned Medical Officer
  • Paid in annual instalments of £10,000 during your final three years of university then a lump sum of £45,000 on successful completion of Officer training
  • You will also be paid an Army salary during your two years of foundation period employment

“I joined a regiment as a General Duties Medical Officer. The best aspect of the General Duties Medical Officer lifestyle is the variety; I work most of the week in a medical centre, much like a GP registrar. But over the last two years, I’ve also covered many exercises in the UK and Canada, providing real life and ‘exercise play’ medical cover. I’ve been able to attend an array of courses on everything from Ultrasound Scanning and Infectious Diseases to Mental Health and Battlefield Advanced Trauma Life Support. I’ve done Adventurous Training too: sailing, sky diving and ice climbing.” – Capt. P. Carslake, RAMC

If you've got your qualifications, then apply online. Your application will be passed to our specialist team, who will help guide you through the process towards joining in this role. You'll need to pass a specialist skills interview to check that your skills are in line with our needs.

Step 1
You will complete two 2-week courses at the Royal Military Academy Sandhurst to form the basis of your military training.

Step 2
Your trade specific training will depend on your civilian qualifications and experience.

Age: 18 years - 54 years 11 months

Fitness:
  • Mid Thigh Pull 50kg
  • Medicine Ball Throw 2.7m
  • 2km run 11m 30s
  • MSFT (beep test) level 6.6
More information about the fitness test

Qualifications: Degree in Medicine. Full registration with the UK General Medical Council (GMC). Clinically Qualified, Current and working in this field.

On successful entry into the Army Medical Services Reserve you will be eligible to apply for consideration in CPD for Professional Qualifications commensurate to Role within with the Army Medical Services.

You'll be paid on a daily rate commensurate to your qualifications. This includes being paid for weekly drill nights. Plus, if you complete all of your annual training days, you’re entitled to a tax-free lump sum called a bounty. 

More about Reserve benefits

“I joined a regiment as a General Duties Medical Officer. The best aspect of the General Duties Medical Officer lifestyle is the variety; I work most of the week in a medical centre, much like a GP registrar. But over the last two years, I’ve also covered many exercises in the UK and Canada, providing real life and ‘exercise play’ medical cover. I’ve been able to attend an array of courses on everything from Ultrasound Scanning and Infectious Diseases to Mental Health and Battlefield Advanced Trauma Life Support. I’ve done Adventurous Training too: sailing, sky diving and ice climbing.” – Capt. P. Carslake, RAMC

If you've got your qualifications, then apply online. Your application will be passed to our specialist team, who will help guide you through the process towards joining in this role. You'll need to pass a specialist skills interview to check that your skills are in line with our needs.

Sours: https://apply.army.mod.uk/roles/army-medical-service/doctor
6 Things You NEED To Know BEFORE Joining The Army Reserves

The Department of Defence requires ADF employees to have a security clearance appropriate to their employment.

A process of background checks, collection of relevant information and if required, interviews, enables the Australian Government Security Vetting Agency (AGSVA) to make an informed assessment of an applicant's suitability for a security clearance.

The minimum security clearance level required is Negative Vetting Level 1 (NV1), and current policy requires applicants to have a checkable background for the previous 10 years.

This means applicants must provide credible referees (non-family members) who are able to provide information about the applicant covering an extended period of time. Required information for an NV1 includes, but is not limited to, the following:

  • Residence
  • Employment
  • Education
  • Financial information
  • Travel

Some ADF jobs may require a higher level of security clearance such as Negative Vetting Level 2 (NV2) or Positive Vetting (PV). Your individual circumstances will determine the number and complexity of the questions and the supporting documents required for these levels.

Australian Citizenship is a requirement for a security clearance and a clearance will only be granted to a non-citizen in exceptional circumstances.

The security clearance is critical to an applicant's successful progression through the recruiting process. It is strongly recommended that all applicants action the Security Clearance Package (ePack) and provide the required documentation without delay to provide the best opportunity to commence training and be employed in their preferred employment category.

For more detailed information on the security vetting process and specific clearance level requirements set by AGSVA, please refer to the AGSVA website.

Support will be provided by DFR during the initial application process.

Sours: https://www.defencejobs.gov.au/jobs/reserves/army/doctor

Army reserve doctor

Licensed Physician Options

Licensed physicians can serve in the Military on either a full-time or part-time basis. Whichever option you choose, the Military will provide all the tools you need to practice your specialty and spend time with patients without worrying about overhead, personnel or budgets. Additionally, you could receive a substantial signing bonus, depending on your specialty.

Steps for Joining

  • Determine if you are eligible to join the Military.
  • Contact a recruiter.
  • Your recruiter will schedule a physical examination for you via a Military Entrance Processing Station or the Department of Defense Medical Examination Review Board.
  • Keep in mind that the application process may be anywhere from three to six months or longer depending on how long it takes to complete the application, review your credentials, obtain a security clearance and ensure that you meet medical requirements.

What to Expect If You Serve Part Time

Many physicians in the Reserve and Guard have served in the active-duty military; however, you can still join even if you have not had prior experience. In general, entrance requirements and officer training for the Reserve and Guard are the same as they are for the active-duty forces. You are expected to drill one weekend a month and two full weeks during the year and be prepared to deploy. Examples of your monthly drill may include helping at a nearby military medical center or hospital, filling in for physicians who are deployed or participating in field exercises.

More about Eligibility Requirements

Service Commitment

Most physicians sign up for a minimum of three years of service. Your commitment may be longer depending on the types of bonuses you accept upon joining.

More on Financial Benefits

Sours: https://www.medicineandthemilitary.com/joining-and-eligibility/licensed-physician-options
How Army Reservists From The NHS Get Ready For The Frontline - Forces TV

As in the verses ". A young mare flies forward and crumples feather grass. ", well, in this case - Stas.

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Why do you need me. Nar-Meya can serve sirra. Nar-Meya will carry out all, all of his orders. Prepare food, wash clothes. And to give pleasure when sirra wished, the Argonian licked her lips.



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