400 cummins horsepower

400 cummins horsepower DEFAULT

Quote:

Originally Posted by SmokinCATView Post

Honestly I won't be helping on this one, anyone that has bought into the PP mind set is hard to help because some of what works doesn't jive with what they have read from Bruce.

Prime example, thinking that you can gain 50hp on a big cam without touching the pump.


I think that if you actually read my post, I do a lot of saying, "is this correct?"
There is nowhere in there where I say, "hey guys, let me tell you the way that it is, I know all about this". Quite the contrary.

So I absolutely have no understanding of what your problem is. These forums are supposed to be about an exchange of information.

My attempt here was to gain a better fundamental understanding of turning up an engine. What is right, what is wrong, and the theory that this is based upon to make an informed decision. Just because you CAN do something does not mean that you should.

As far as pp, yes, I have read their articles. I have also read everything that I can find on the subject. There is a lot of conflicting information, which I believe that I said in my original post, so I came here seeking answers.

And I have to say to you, Mr smokin , I was very much looking forward to your response. I have read your posts on other forums, and I did have a healthy respect for what you have to say.

But after your reply, I feel quite differently. I came here asking, "is this correct?", and your response is to tell me that you are not going to help me because...????.... I am misinformed?... Because... I said something that you don't agree with?... Because... I received information from someone else before I asked you?... Because... you are Bruce's jilted lover??? I don't know, but your attitude problem makes zero sense to me.

These do not seem like reasons to not help someone. Furthermore, I have asked numerous direct questions in my post that could simply have been answered. I can only ascertain that you do not have the knowledge to answer those questions. So my real misinformation was thinking that you were the person to go to for help. Obviously not.

It's no wonder pp is so popular. If everyone asked a jerk like you for advice, I am sure that the masses would flock to Bruce.

Thank you to the guys that gave me good, helpful information.


Last edited by fld; 12-18-2013 at 04:16 PM.

Sours: http://www.competitiondiesel.com/forums/showthread.php?t=163759

Cummins Turbodiesel Timeline

Model Year

Rated Horsepower

Rated Torque

Notes

1989

160 hp @ 2,500 rpm

400 lb-ft @ 1,600 rpm

Dodge introduces Cummins turbodiesel for 1989 model year.

1990

160 hp @ 2,500 rpm

400 lb-ft @ 1,600 rpm

N/A

1991

160 hp @ 2,500 rpm

400 lb-ft @ 1,600 rpm

Intercooler introduced for 1991 model year Ram pickups.

1992

160 hp @ 2,500 rpm

400 lb-ft @ 1,600 rpm

N/A

1993

160 hp @ 2,500 rpm

400 lb-ft @ 1,600 rpm

N/A

1994

Auto Trans:

160 hp @ 2,500 rpm

400 lb-ft @ 1,500 rpm

Bosch P7100 replaces VE44 injection pump.

 

Manual Trans:

175 hp @ 2,600 rpm

420 lb-ft @ 1,500 rpm

1995

Auto Trans:

160 hp @ 2,500 rpm

400 lb-ft @ 1,500 rpm

N/A

Manual Trans:

175 hp @ 2,600 rpm

420 lb-ft @ 1,500 rpm

1996

Auto Trans:

180 hp @ 2,500 rpm

420 lb-ft @ 1,500 rpm

N/A

Manual Trans:

215 hp @ 2,600 rpm

440 lb-ft @ 1,500 rpm

1997

Auto Trans:

180 hp @ 2,500 rpm

420 lb-ft @ 1,500 rpm

N/A

Manual Trans:

215 hp @ 2,600 rpm

440 lb-ft @ 1,500 rpm

1998 (5.9L 12v)

Auto Trans:

180 hp @ 2,500 rpm

420 lb-ft @ 1,500 rpm

Last model year of production for the 12 valve Cummins.

Manual Trans:

215 hp @ 2,600 rpm

440 lb-ft @ 1,500 rpm

1998.5 (5.9L 24v)

Auto Trans:

215 hp @ 2,700 rpm

420 lb-ft @ 1,600 rpm

24 valve Cummins introduced mid-model year, replaces 12 valve.

Manual Trans:

235 hp @ 2,700 rpm

460 lb-ft @ 1,600 rpm

1999

Auto Trans:

215 hp @ 2,700 rpm

420 lb-ft @ 1,600 rpm

N/A

Manual Trans:

235 hp @ 2,700 rpm

460 lb-ft @ 1,600 rpm

2000

Auto Trans:

215 hp @ 2,700 rpm

420 lb-ft @ 1,600 rpm

N/A

Manual Trans:

235 hp @ 2,700 rpm

460 lb-ft @ 1,600 rpm

2001

Standard:

235 hp @ 2,700 rpm

460 lb-ft @ 1,400 rpm

High output Cummins introduced, NV5600 manual trans only, not available in California.

High Output:

245 hp @ 2,900 rpm

505 lb-ft @ 1,400 rpm

2002

Standard:

235 hp @ 2,700 rpm

460 lb-ft @ 1,400 rpm

N/A

High Output:

245 hp @ 2,900 rpm

505 lb-ft @ 1,400 rpm

2003

Standard:

235 hp @ 2,700 rpm

460 lb-ft @ 1,400 rpm

Bosch High pressure common rail replaces VP44 injection pump.

High Output:

305 hp @ 2,900 rpm

555 lb-ft @ 1,400 rpm

2004

Standard:

305 hp @ 2,900 rpm

555 lb-ft @ 1,400 rpm

N/A

California only:

235 hp @ 2,700 rpm

460 lb-ft @ 1,400 rpm

High Output:

325 hp @ 2,900 rpm

600 lb-ft @ 1,600 rpm

2005

325 hp @ 2,900 rpm

610 lb-ft @ 1,600 rpm

N/A

2006

325 hp @ 2,900 rpm

610 lb-ft @ 1,600 rpm

N/A

2007 (5.9L 24v)

325 hp @ 2,900 rpm

610 lb-ft @ 1,600 rpm

Last production year of the 5.9L Cummins.

2007.5 (6.7L)

Auto Trans:

350 hp @ 3,013 rpm

650 lb-ft @ 1,500 rpm

6.7L Cummins introduced mid-model year as replacement for the 5.9L; meets stricter emissions regulations, diesel particulate filter (DPF) becomes standard equipment.

Manual Trans:

350 hp @ 3,013 rpm

610 lb-ft @ 1,500 rpm

2008

Auto Trans:

350 hp @ 3,013 rpm

650 lb-ft @ 1,500 rpm

N/A

Manual Trans:

350 hp @ 3,013 rpm

610 lb-ft @ 1,500 rpm

2009

Auto Trans:

350 hp @ 3,013 rpm

650 lb-ft @ 1,500 rpm

N/A

Manual Trans:

350 hp @ 3,013 rpm

610 lb-ft @ 1,500 rpm

2010

Auto Trans:

350 hp @ 3,013 rpm

650 lb-ft @ 1,500 rpm

N/A

Manual Trans:

350 hp @ 3,013 rpm

610 lb-ft @ 1,500 rpm

2011

Auto Trans:

350 hp @ 3,000 rpm

650 lb-ft @ 1,500 rpm

Cummins, Ram Trucks launch higher output, 800 lb-ft engine in February of the 2011 model year.

Manual Trans:

350 hp @ 3,000 rpm

610 lb-ft @ 1,500 rpm

Feb. 2011 + Build:

350 hp @ 3,000 rpm

800 lb-ft @ 1,600 rpm

2012

Auto Trans:

350 hp @ 3,000 rpm

800 lb-ft @ 1,600 rpm

N/A

Manual Trans:

350 hp @ 3,000 rpm

610 lb-ft @ 1,500 rpm

2013

Manual Trans (G56):

350 hp @ 2,800 rpm

660 lb-ft @ 1,500 rpm

3 versions of the Cummins available for 2013 model year; G56 manual, 68RFE automatic, and Aisin automatic transmissions. High Output (H.O.) model, Aisin transmission only available on Ram 3500 pickups. Selective catalytic reduction (SCR) requiring the use of diesel exhaust fluid (DEF) also becomes standard on all Cummins engines.

Auto Trans (68RFE):

370 hp @ 2,800 rpm

800 lb-ft @ 1,600 rpm

Auto Trans (Aisin):

385 hp @ 2,800 rpm

850 lb-ft @ 1,600 rpm

2014

Manual Trans (G56):

350 hp @ 2,800 rpm

660 lb-ft @ 1,500 rpm

N/A

Auto Trans (68RFE):

370 hp @ 2,800 rpm

800 lb-ft @ 1,600 rpm

Auto Trans (Aisin):

385 hp @ 2,800 rpm

850 lb-ft @ 1,600 rpm

2015

Manual Trans (G56):

350 hp @ 2,800 rpm

660 lb-ft @ 1,500 rpm

High Output (H.O.) Cummins mated to the Aisin transmission receives 15 lb-ft increase in torque output, remains available only on Ram 3500 models.

Auto Trans (68RFE):

370 hp @ 2,800 rpm

800 lb-ft @ 1,600 rpm

Auto Trans (Aisin):

385 hp @ 2,800 rpm

865 lb-ft @ 1,600 rpm

2016

Manual Trans (G56):

350 hp @ 2,800 rpm

660 lb-ft @ 1,500 rpm

H.O. Cummins gains 35 lb-ft for 2016 model year, raising peak torque to 900 lb-ft. High Output engine only available in Ram 3500 model trucks and only available mated to Aisin AS69RC automatic transmission.

Auto Trans (68RFE):

370 hp @ 2,800 rpm

800 lb-ft @ 1,600 rpm

Auto Trans (Aisin):

385 hp @ 2,800 rpm

900 lb-ft @ 1,600 rpm

2017

Manual Trans (G56):

350 hp @ 2,800 rpm

660 lb-ft @ 1,500 rpm

N/A - no significant changes

Auto Trans (68RFE):

370 hp @ 2,800 rpm

800 lb-ft @ 1,600 rpm

Auto Trans (Aisin):

385 hp @ 2,800 rpm

900 lb-ft @ 1,600 rpm

2018

Manual Trans (G56):

350 hp @ 2,800 rpm

660 lb-ft @ 1,500 rpm

Auto Trans (68RFE):

370 hp @ 2,800 rpm

800 lb-ft @ 1,700 rpm

Auto Trans (Aisin):

385 hp @ 2,800 rpm

930 lb-ft @ 1,700 rpm

2019

68RFE Auto Trans:

370 hp @ 2,800 rpm

850 lb-ft @ 1,700 rpm

H.O. Cummins gains 15 hp & 70 lb-ft, peaks at 1,000 lb-ft of torque. Standard Cummins gains 50 lb-ft, no horsepower change. Manual transmission no longer available.

Aisin Auto Trans:

400 hp @ 2,800 rpm

1,000 lb-ft @ 1,800 rpm

2020

68RFE Auto Trans:

370 hp @ 2,800 rpm

850 lb-ft @ 1,700 rpm

N/A - no significant changes over previous model year

Aisin Auto Trans:

400 hp @ 2,800 rpm

1,000 lb-ft @ 1,800 rpm

Sours: http://www.cumminshub.com/timeline.html
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  1. Jonbass that engine I drove had a MAX of 600PSI at the Rail on that dyno run when we broke a DYNO RATED FOR 700 HP WHEN IT HIT 720 I WAS ONLY AT 450PSI RAIL AND 40 LBS TURBO OUT OF 60 I COULD FEED HER. She also had CERMET Pistons retro fitted Highflow cooling system instead of the crap low flow was equipped with a CAC retrofit we thank Kitty Cat for the Intake on that one. You know a 3406B model intake will mate up with a BIG CAMIV block. If I had really wanted to get extreme I also had water injection to cool off the exhaust if needed. However the Turbo was only at 1000 and would hold til 1200 safe.

    Even pulling Snowshoe in PA she never got hotter than 900 normally Pyro temp. However there was one time she did melt down right before the overhaul. My mother had a Heart attack I found out and my boss told me even if I blew it up scream it in. Wrong thing to tell me that day. IL escorted me in from the KY line I was on I-24 at the time and I came in screaming by the time I got her back to the yard 2 pistons had holes in them one was cracked and #5 had swalled a valve. Why because I melted the turbo into a pile of SLAG.

    Wouldn't it have been cheaper to park the truck, rent a car, and send another driver out to bring the truck home?
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  3. At the time MOMMA WAS CRITICAL Even my dads company over the QC pulled his Governor controls to get him back after relaying his load. They bounced him in 700 miles to get him home. My brother in the USAF and his wife and kid were told GET HOME Emergancy leave. At the time the company I drove for had all of 20 trucks small outfit and that weekend we were all busy most of us were all heading out 4 of us were coming IN to the yard. I was the closest to the Yard and I still did not make it home til 6 PM that night and my dad did not get home til 3 am SUNDAY morning. My Oldest Brother made it in at 8 am Sunday I ran to the next town got my older brother by 8 Saturday night and by 10 AM Sunday we were all in Springfield IL at the Hospital were they had transferred my mother. She was there til Weds of that week.

    Also when they tore the truck down they found the issue. See it had not been OVerhauled YET to become a beast we had hopped her up slightly aka maybe to 540 or so using the pump. Well the foremen found that the Radiatior had lost part of the flow restrictor and it had lodged in the cooling passage of the #1 head also when they examined the Turbo the Factory Original one with 1.1 MILLION on it well they found a crack in the bearing that blocked OIL FEED and that caused the melt down.

    Then the boss went thru the maintance records and my writeups. Saw I had written it up for running hot and also Turbo boost low for 4 weeks PRIOR to the meltdown. I was cleared in the incident the foreman however was looking for a new job. When he called me up and said well you melted her down and I am going to rebuild her for you were do you want the parts to come from I told him DI of Pittsburgh. He goes how much power do you want I said about 700 would be nice he gave me we think at max 850.

    BTW that truck is STILL running hauls grain for a farmer and he LOVES HER in fact he calls her the best money he spent can get 2 extra rounds a day out of that truck compared to a 350.
  4. No offense but the guys at pittsburgh power dont have much of a clue as to how to build a hot big cam motor. They dont get enough fuel pressure to the them. in order for a big cam to run hard u need at least 240lbs of fuel pressure. PP struggles to get 220lbs at 2200 rpm. so what u end up with is a motor that only runs good at 19 to 2200 and doesnt have any power and gets hot easy. There is only one guy I know that can build a good pump for these engines, Tom Roberts, but unfortunatly he wont build any anymore. pp opens the throttle shaft in the pump up to much and u loose all the pressure that way. Just dont run good with one of their pumps. Plus his pistons are to low of a compression ratio. He may promise 700hp but your never gonna make it.
    How would you get this motor to preform
  5. Just get a yellow one and call it a day, i have yet to come across a "come-apart" that i havent blown it doors off. Then again my "five fifty kitty" is more of a "not so stock kitty" :biggrin_25523:
    Hey i am new here and glad to be here. I do admit the c15 cats ARE top of the line on power with just a hook up on a lap top or a programer, i have drove a fld with a 550 and 358 gears and a 13 over pulled like a beast. A cat will out pull about anything out they with just a little modification. But i have also worked on trucks for a long time before i ever drove one my dad was a truck driver and mechanic for cat for 10 years. cat engines are among the most costly to over haul, the fld i drove went down at less than a half a million miles, it was pumping antifreeze out the blowby tube, and had a cracked head, put over 9 grand in a inframe. alot of truck drivers do not know the joy of driving a truck with a manual engine, one that does not have a ecm. Now my truck is a 1980 w9 that has a big cam 350 cummins that has proved it self to not only me but the previous owner, i have had over 35 tons on a log trailer, the truck runs great, i can pull jellico mt about 50 mph grossing 92 thosand pounds in 8th over, it has a 13 over and 4.11 ratio. Now i can do a inframe on this engine for less than a grand in parts. The best part of drivin a old manual motor is when u hit the hammer the black smoke roll from the stacks and the cheack engine light doesn't come on and worry u to death, now don't get me wrong i love to drive cats and have enjoyed a few 2 stroke dd to, they are all good engine but for me i will stick with what i have it is paid for and i know about ever ince of a 855 big cam.
  6. No offense but the guys at pittsburgh power dont have much of a clue as to how to build a hot big cam motor. They dont get enough fuel pressure to the them. in order for a big cam to run hard u need at least 240lbs of fuel pressure. PP struggles to get 220lbs at 2200 rpm. so what u end up with is a motor that only runs good at 19 to 2200 and doesnt have any power and gets hot easy. There is only one guy I know that can build a good pump for these engines, Tom Roberts, but unfortunatly he wont build any anymore. pp opens the throttle shaft in the pump up to much and u loose all the pressure that way. Just dont run good with one of their pumps. Plus his pistons are to low of a compression ratio. He may promise 700hp but your never gonna make it.
    None taken! But i think you may of had some other issues with fuel psi, they did my stc bc4 made 500 psi turned 3000 rpm, not sure what your talking about 220 psi:biggrin_25511: Why won't Tom build any more pumps? I agree PP is not the best on electronics, but mech wasn't bad. Just my .02.
  7. No offense but the guys at pittsburgh power dont have much of a clue as to how to build a hot big cam motor. They dont get enough fuel pressure to the them. in order for a big cam to run hard u need at least 240lbs of fuel pressure. PP struggles to get 220lbs at 2200 rpm. so what u end up with is a motor that only runs good at 19 to 2200 and doesnt have any power and gets hot easy. There is only one guy I know that can build a good pump for these engines, Tom Roberts, but unfortunatly he wont build any anymore. pp opens the throttle shaft in the pump up to much and u loose all the pressure that way. Just dont run good with one of their pumps. Plus his pistons are to low of a compression ratio. He may promise 700hp but your never gonna make it.
    240 lbs of fuel pressure and you will be replacing the cam before 50,000 miles because the injector lobes will be flat. You need higher flowing injectors and high volume of fuel to make power and have the engine live. Also higher compression, high boost and lots of fuel = broken head bolts and hot pyro on a cummins. Look at the factory specs, the lowest power big cam engines like the formula 290 had the highest compression.
    If your just fooling around, you can dig the little plastic ball out of the end of the throttle shaft and turn the fine adjustment screw for the fuel pressure out all the way. Takes 5 minutes and will bump your fuel pressure up 20-40 lbs depending on where it was initally set.
    4 main things to make a cummins run
    1. More fuel
    2. Big Turbo
    3. lower compression
    4. ###### cam timing
  8. The word tripped the censor. I would word it 'decrease the injection timing advance'.

    Most engines in other applications that are powered up also have lower compression ratio pistons. This would be agricultural, industrial, construction, or marine engines
  9. kah68

    kah68Bobtail Member

    Yup Kurt's the man, he even hooked me up with a marine ecm. According to him it should spit out 900whp.... Just waiting on the turbo now.
    Does that not kill your MPGs
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  • Sours: https://www.thetruckersreport.com/truckingindustryforum/
    855 Big Cam IV Adding Horsepower

    10 Best and Worst Diesel Engines in History

    Best Diesel Engine - Series 60Ah the elusive diesel engine: power, strength and the raw horsepower to get the things done. You can’t go wrong with diesel and in this author’s humble opinion you’re already way ahead of the curve if you go diesel vs a puny gas engine. Ok we get it. Diesel is awesome but what diesel truck engine out there is truly the BEST? Cummins guys will fight until their dying breath that the Cummins 5.9 is arguably the best diesel engine ever made while CAT or PowerStroke gents will look in disbelief at the verbal diarrhea spewing forth from their buddies’ mouths. The debate is as old as Rudolf Diesel himself. Well good thing I don’t have to be “The Decider”… I don’t need that kind of pressure. Good thing someone else is willing to take the bullet for me. The guys over at Capital Reman, have given it their best shot to rank the Top 10 Best and Worst diesel engines of all time. This article is about what they came up with. What do ya’ll think? Did they hit the nail on the head or completely miss the target on this one?

    Honorable Mention: The Cummins B-Series

    Why We Like It: This engine wasn’t the first Cummins Engine to bring some respectability to the medium duty diesel engine market but it surly refined it. The 4BT, 6BT and ISB 5.9L engines absolutely killed it in the torque rating capability. You need to tow something these engines have got you covered. Honorable mention on the best diesel engine of all time list isn’t too shabby.

    The Specs:
    • Engine Type: Four Stroke, Six Cylinder, Inline
    • Bore x Stroke: 4.02 x 4.72 in
    • Displacement: 359 ci (5.9L)Best Diesel Engine - Cummins B Series
    • Fuel Injection: Electronic high-pressure common rail
    • Construction: Cast-iron block and head
    • Compression Ratio: 17.2:1
    • Maximum Power: 325 hp
    • Maximum Torque: 610 lb-ft

    5. International DT-466

    Why We Like It: What’s not to like about this engine?! If you’ve ever driven on a public highway you’ve probably passed 47 trucks running a DT-466 engine. Baby, this engine hauls America’s freight on a daily basis and is the backbone of the medium-duty fleets all over the country. It is a favorite of fleet managers because they run forever, have great torque to power ratio and can actually be rebuilt right in the frame of the truck. Number 5 seems fitting for the best diesel engine for the sheer number of units currently still on the road.

    The Specs:
    • Type and Description: Four Stroke, Six Cylinder, Inline
    • Displacement: 466 ci (7.6L)
    • Bore and Stroke: 4.59×4.68 in
    • Compression Ratio: 16.4:1Best Diesel Engine - International DT466
    • Governed Speed: 2,600 rpm
    • Total Engine Weight (dry): 1,425 lb (647 kg)
    • Maximum Power: 170-350 hp
    • Maximum Torque: 860 lb-ft

    Worst International Engine: VT-265, VT-265, VT-335, VT-365 Series (Became PowerStroke 6.0L)

    Why We Hate It: The VT-265 and VT-335 in particular were part of the International Light Duty models released in 2003. Ford adopted the Powerstroke officially in 2003 but was unofficially in production starting in 1994. The predecessors were bigger 6 cylinders however an International bean counter decided it would be a grand idea to chop off 2 of the cylinders producing a 4 cylinder engine. This didn’t go over too well and the VT-265 and VT-335 were horribly under-powered. Best diesel engine? I think not.

    4. Mack E-7

    Why We Like It: Ruff! Ruff! Ruff! Grrrr… That’s a good boy! What’s not to love about the Mack Bulldog. Mack truck engines have been around since 1893 when the Mack Brothers bought Fallsen & Berry Wagon Company in Brooklyn, New York. Mack has always been known as a slow and steady workhorse. It produced its first hook and ladder fire engine in 1909, produced over 6,000 trucks for the US and British Military during WWI and helped build the Hoover Dam in 1933. Its engines are known for their crankshaft to wheel torque ratio. These are the engines that built America. The Mack E-7 was first produced in 1988 and lasted until the early 21st century. They are extremely simple to overhaul and rebuild and do exactly what you need for them. They won’t win any races but are extremely reliable engines. When you think of the best diesel engine you can’t leave out the bulldog. Good on ya Mack!

    The Specs:
    • Engine Type: Four Stroke, Six Cylinder, InlineBest Diesel Engine - Mack E7
    • Displacement: 672-998 ci (11.01- 16.35L)
    • Bore and Stroke: 6.50×6.70 in
    • Fuel Delivery: Unit fuel injection
    • Aspiration: Turbocharged
    • Governed Speed: 1,700-1,800 rpm
    • Maximum Power: Up to 454 hp
    • Maximum Torque: Up to 1,660 lb-ft

    Worst Mack Engine: None… Macks are Awesome! That and there only like 5 models. E-6, E-7, E-Tech, MP8, MP11 etc… all pretty solid.

    3. CAT 3406E

    Why We Like It: It’s good to be The King! It is amazing how many people bleed yellow and rightfully so in most cases. There have been some catastrophic failures in the Caterpillar line of engines; the 3406E is not one of them. The CAT 3406 comes in the A,B,C and E models and then evolved into the CAT C15 then CAT C15 Acert engine. This was a very successful engine for CAT as it was really the first evolved electronic engine that was done right. This was such a great engine that the vast majority of Peterbuilt trucks in the mid 90s and 00s all had Caterpillar 3406E engines in them. The ECM design was easy to work with and bread a following of programmers that were able to write a variety of software for the engine. This “open source” concept with the ECM allowed end users to “hot rod them up” to add more horsepower and torque to the engine via the injectors, camshaft or valve timing. Even in 2016 the CAT 3406E is still in millions of on-road and off-road applications across the world. Overall Caterpillar is the unofficial king of diesel engines and it deserves its place as number 3 on the best diesel engine list.

    The Specs:
    • Engine Type: Four Stroke, Six Cylinder, Inline
    • Displacement: 893.39 ci (14.64L)Best Diesel Engine - CAT 3406 Picture
    • Bore and Stroke: 6.50×6.70 in
    • Fuel Delivery: Unit fuel injection
    • Aspiration: Turbocharged
    • Compression Ratio: 14.5:1
    • Governor Speed: 1,800-2,100 rpm
    • Maximum Power: 375-465 hp
    • Maximum Torque: Up to 1,850 lb-ft

    Worst Caterpillar Engine: 3116

    Why We Hate It: It’s not that we hate the CAT 3116 it’s that we hate the fact that it’s hard to work on. It is extremely hard to time the fuel system and like the VW on the automotive side, working on the CAT 3116 requires special tooling you can only buy from Caterpillar. Typically, it costs up to $5000 in tooling to work on the 3116. The other reason we don’t care much for the 3116 is that it is quite under-powered compared with a Cummins 5.9 or 6BT. The CAT 3116 was engineered to be disposable. Albeit the 3116 was used in a wide variety of application including many marine applications the CAT 3126 and later the CAT C7 were arguably better models. To conclude the CAT 3116 isn’t a terrible engine but is damn near at the bottom of the best diesel engine list.

    2. Cummins 855 Big Cam

    Why We Love It: How could you not immediately fall in love with this engine from the name alone? Kind of rolls off the tongue eh?! The Cummins 855 Big Cam was the last real mechanical variable timing engine mass produced by Cummins in the 1976. The Big Cam replaced the small cam 855 and was the first engine by Cummins to meet the Clean Air Act and noise regulations of that time. There were four generations of the Cummins Big Cam 855 engines, last produced in 1985 and was replaced by the N14. We love the 855 Big Cam because of the raw horsepower it puts out as well as its reliability. You can easily run a Cummins 855 Big Cam 700,000 miles before an overhaul. The Cummins 855 Big Cam was the first engine by Cummins to utilize demand-flow cooling which only cools the engine when the engine demands it. This system then uses the saved horsepower at the crankshaft for more horsepower into the project at hand. The Big Cam II significantly upgraded performance by introducing pulse manifolds into the engines; these were a big selling feature in these engines at the time. Overall horsepower was the main reason this engine was a big seller over the small cam models. The Cummins 855 Big Cam had one of the largest camshaft diameters on the market at the time and features top-stop injectors. Talk to any old school truck drivers in the 1970s and they will tell you tales when the Cummins 855 series were the king of the road. Hard not to leave these engines off the best diesel engine of all time list. There were some drawbacks with the 855 specifically when trying to start the engine in colder climates. The 855 uses a lower pressure fuel injection system at 2,200 psi to power the injectors and varying timing specs, oil/water pump and valve spring pressures. That being said a glow plug or a shot of ether should do the trick to fix this simple issue because overall this is a great engine.

    The Specs:
    • Engine Type: Four Stroke, Six Cylinder, Inline
    • Displacement: 856 ci (14 L)Best Diesel Engine - Cummins 855 Big Cam Picture
    • Bore and Stroke: 5.50×5.98 in
    • Fuel Delivery: Unit fuel injection
    • Aspiration: Turbocharged
    • Compression Ratio: 10:1
    • Governed Speed: 1,800 rpm
    • Maximum Power: Up to 605 hp
    • Maximum Torque: Up to 1,118 lb-ft

    Worst Cummins Engine: Cummins ISX

    Why We Hate It: The Cummins ISX was originally released in 2001 which replaced the longstanding N14 engine of the late 80s and 90s. It was supposed to be the Caddalic and the best diesel engine every designed at Cummins. However that didn’t pan out exactly. The ISX was engineered with a dual overhead cam design; one cam accessed the valve train and the other took care of the actuating injectors. In 2002 the ISXCM870 integrated the Exhaust Gas Recirculation (EGR) which takes the exhaust gas and recirculates it back into the intake of the engine. What this does is lower the combustion chamber temperatures limiting the formation of NOx. A neat concept but there were many issues with this system that caused many engine failures. The main point of failure is the dual overhead cam design which overly complicated things and caused many snowball effect types of issues in the engine. Lastly, the early versions of the ISX had a whole host of issues with the ECM which caused a sour taste in many Cummins owners mouths. In 2010 Cummins re-designed the ISX with a single overhead design to simplify things but the damage was done. This was supposed to be Cummins entrance into the electronic world however it was much too complicated for its own good. It is rightfully so belongs off the best diesel engine list; disappointing indeed.

    1. Detroit Diesel Series 60

    Why We Love It: Hands down the Detroit Diesel Series 60 is the best diesel engine ever produced for the class 8 world. Fun fact of the day: the Detroit Diesel Series 60 was mostly developed by John Deere although how much of an influence Deere had is debatable. The Detroit Diesel Series 50 cylinder heads were casted by John Deere Engine Company. In the early 1970s GM’s Detroit Diesel had roughly 41% market share of all diesel engines sold in America. By the early 1980s that number had shrunk to roughly 4% market share. GM knew the company was in trouble and sought out help from John Deere engineers to re-establish their reputation. There was a proposed joint-venture between the two companies that didn’t pan out however JD engineers purportedly designed the ring-system which fixed a lot of issues the Series 60 had with oil leakage problems as well as developed the cylinder head design. The main caveat of the Series 60 was the introduction of the first electronically controlled engine with the proprietary “DDEC” or Detroit Diesel Engine Control technology. The proposed company was to be known as “DEDEC” or Detroit Engines, Deere Engine Company. However the joint venture never came to fruition but the engine control technology took off.

    The first diesel ECM was wildly popular with consumers due to its ease of use and updates in real time to the driver. Functions in the DDEC system included engine diagnostic functions, shutdown timers, progressive shift functions, fault history and record keeping, speed limiting governors, cruise control and automatic stall preventing. The cruise control technology was particularly popular with fleet managers due to its fuel-saving function but most notably DDEC system allowed the operator to download engine management reports regarding use of the engine, provide record of over-speeding, excessive idle time, hard breaking and other parameters. The DDEC allowed dealers to change the horsepower settings and in some cases propriety software was able to be loaded into the computer. The system was easy to operate and diagnostic codes were displayed to the driver in real time: red indicator lights signaled a major problem while a yellow light was less of a serious issue. Detroit Diesel did not invent the modern day ECM but rather adapted General Motors ECM technology from the early 1980s into diesel technology. The first ECM was created by BMW in 1939 for the Kommandogerat airplane during WWII. The DDEC boom set in motion the electronic era for diesel engines.

    The Series 60 became the most popular selling diesel engine for Detroit Diesel and the company went on to produce the DDEC I, DDEC II, DDEC III, DDEC IV and 14L/DDEC V hybrid engines from 1987-2007. The Series 60 was first major diesel engine that did open the lead cam on the bigger bore. The DDEC IV got up to 575 hp before being replaced by the 14.0 L engine in 2007. There are millions of Detroit Diesel Series 60 engines still on the road today and it is extremely easy to remanufacture Detroit Diesel Series 60 engines due to their unrestricted open source design.  For 20 years Freightliner and Penske trucks all had exclusive contracts to include Series 60 engines in their trucks. All heil the king of diesel, may it continue to live in the history books as the best diesel engine in the world.

    The Specs:

    • Engine Type: Four-cycle, six-cylinder, inline
    • Displacement: 778-855 ci (12.7- to 14.0L)Best Diesel Engine - Detroit Diesel Series 60
    • Bore and Stroke: 5.24×6.61 in
    • Fuel Delivery: Unit fuel injection
    • Aspiration: Turbocharged
    • Governed Speed: 2,100 rpm
    • Maximum Power: Up to 515 hp
    • Maximum Torque: Up to 1,650 lb-ft

    Worst Detroit Engine: All old two-stroke Series 50, V-71 or V-92, technology. Good stuff but technology has surpassed these old engines. The old two stroke technology is easy to work on but boy that stuff is past its prime.

    Well there you have it: the best diesel engines of all time… followed by the subsequent worst diesel engines. No matter what diesel engine you’ve got in your big rig or skid loader it’s probably not too shabby. You can’t go wrong with a diesel. Let the discussion begin!

    Sours: https://www.capitalremanexchange.com

    Horsepower 400 cummins



    NCSDSo I'm having a little trouble finding the right truck.. Now I'm looking at a '91 KW T600 straight truck. Its got a 400 big cam cummins with about 800K on it. about 100K on an OH. What should I be looking for on an engine this age and mileage?? no major leaks and starts and runs good. What are some known faults of a 400 cummins?? TIA!


    SE IdahoI had a friend tell me the Big Cam 4 would get hot. Not sure which motor you are looking at but that was his problem with that motor. 1,2, or 3 were good engines though.


    west central illinoisGood engine. The overhead needs run on them religiously at 100,000 it probably needs ran again fairly soon. I have a 400 in my 9670 and it has the low flow coolant system, I have no complaints with it but my cummins mechanic doesn't have much good to say about that system. I'm sure yours is the same being a 91.


    East Prairie, MO<p>I've got a big cam 3 in an International 9370 tri-axle dump with that low flow system too, don't think anybody likes it, seems easier to get hot if you don't watch what you are doing. I would say drive it and if it feels too strong it probably is, those could have the button in the pump messed with to give them extreme HP and without a sensible driver the head bolts can get stretched. I bought this truck with a bad motor and found a nice 500k salvage replacement but used my pump....found out what happened to the old motor, it was turned way to far up (had a "17" button in it, doesn't mean anything to me really) and my driver stretched the head bolts before we knew what was going on. Not really his fault as we just thought it had guts! Had it put back closer to stock but Fixing to tear it down and put head gaskets and new head bolts on it soon, it's a slobbering mess right now...</p>

    Edited by semosandfarmer 12/15/2013 21:35


    NCSDHow do I tell whether its a 1, 2, or 3?? Markings on it somewhere?? Yeah this one has that low-flow cooling thing. Just by looking at it I'm not a fan...too many hoses and cobbled up mess!! Being 10 degrees when I drove it its hard to say whether it gets hot or not.

    Iowagood engine. If it has low flow cooling don't worry about it. People get scared of stuff they don't understand. It could be a mechanical N14 too. Around that year is when the N14 came out

    Northeast COJust keep the radiator clean and you'll be ok


    East Prairie, MO

    Hayhauler - 12/15/2013 22:45 Just keep the radiator clean and you'll be ok

     

    Yes, this is the key.



    SouthCentral WII would say the "key" is to keep the coolant additive package up to the high end of the scale or you will have liner pitting. To high and you will get to put in a water pump. That was always our issue with the 88 nt big cam 4 which is probably what this truck has if it. Assuming that it is the original engine and it is not an N14. BTDT
    Towman


    A '91 would be a 365 or 444

    444 had more trouble

    SouthCentral WIOMG, I completely forgot about the 444 ! Maybe my mind is trying to keep me from grinding my teeth over that memory. Kind of reminds me of someone on here talking about the "great" 903. I still stand by my "key" statement.
    Towman

    Edited by towman2000 12/16/2013 05:51



    Some of us "poor" folks still have too close of "encounters" of the old days

    neighbor still tries to use his 444 from the field

    ne nebI still have a 444. I must be a lucky one cause mine has a million 4 on it and only had bearings and injectors. I know most were junk.

    NE ARThere should be letters casted in the side of the block, I think on the fuel pump side , Big Cam ?


    North Liberty and South Bend, IndianaWhat makes a 444 so bad. Are they not identical blocks just bigger injectors with a higher pump flow setting and different timing?

    Dearfield Co.Well after owning a bunch of low flow cooling trucks I will state yes the radiator needs kept clean and chemical levels checked but thats every diesel engine not just big cam cummins.The only issue I ever had with any of the low flow motors is thermostats and fuel issues on the 444.They only had a dozen or so updates on inj in the first 2 years in the life of this engine.the thermostat issue is unpredictable and all my trucks carried a set when we ran them.I think the 444 and 365 were way better engines than the early big cam 1 engines that had worse issues with the odd head bolts and paper thin cam bearings

    Piqua, OHDon't buy a truck with a low flow system. Mechanics aren't as familiar with them and they need constant babying. If you do buy one make sure it's always full of coolant(clear up to the neck) and keep the radiator clean.
    Sours: https://talk.newagtalk.com/forums/thread-view.asp?tid=437835&DisplayType=flat
    400hp First Gen Cummins

    He put it into his father's mouth, I must say just a horse portion. The semen was thick and stringy. Having swallowed everything, I did not release his dick from my mouth, but continuing to suck gently resumed the unexpectedly interrupted work. Of my ass. Igor surprised me very much by unexpectedly pulling his penis out of me and pushing it into the ass let me know that I would turn.

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