Jeep xj coolant

Jeep xj coolant DEFAULT

Re: COOLANT IS BROWNISH COLORED


I battled the same thing in my jeep, i have finally almost won the battle after literally 10+ fully flush sessions. I would get a silt like sludge at the bottom of the overflow, brown or brown/green coolant, and the same silt/mud settling like a paste on the radiator filler neck. If you were to remove the rad cap and stick your finger in the neck (where it is horizontal) you could literally scrape out like a 1/8" of 'mud/silt/sludge' type stuff. I bought it at 130k when it was 10 years old.

At first I fully drained the system, removing both the lower rad hose and the drain plug in the block.(was going to use the petcock but it nearly broke off so i just retightened and left it) I flushed the entire system with hose water for a long time. I did the flush in both directions in the heater core, radiator, the other coolant hoses, drain in the block ect, anywhere i could get the hose i blasted it out. Let that drain, filled with the 5+ hour flush and water, then dumped that,fully filled with distilled drove around for 15 min, dumped that and filled with 50/50 distilled/coolant.

In less than 2 months the coolant was back to its usual self! (barely green/brown, sediment floating in it/'mud' at the bottom of the overflow) So the following times (9+ literally) i just did the hose flush like crazy on it, cleaned out the overflow, always finding 1/2"+ of this mud on the bottom, then i would blow out everything as much as i could with compressed air to get as much of the remaining hose water out of there, refill with distilled water and coolant.

So far so good, i did recently change my radiator and when i changed it the coolant had be in it for about 3 months and still looked pretty good, with very slight sediment still in it, but 99% better than it was at any other time. So after the new rad went in, i did another flush/fill, and its been good (but its only been about a month or so) i think when flushing, a lot of times the radiator holds sediment caked up in it, and is slowly released into the coolant. so it just takes time and lots of flush's an eventually you get it all out.


PS: I heard a really good flush (and cheap) is using regular white vinegar about 50/50 or so with distilled, and running that for a few hours and dumping, dont leave it in too long. apparently it eats mineral deposits if someone used regular non distilled water in it.

Sours: https://naxja.org/forum/showthread.php?t=1025068
Prestone was dieing their anti-freeze yellow a few years back. Hopefully its NOT Prestone's "All Makes, All Models, Mixes with all Colors" Antifreeze, I think that might be yellow, if it was, that might explain why its cloudy, and its good you got it out of the system.

Perhaps the previous owner retro-fitted to G-05, which is probably good. Something we may all have to do, read below.

X2 on the Distilled Water. Tap Water has a lot of minerals in it, and those minerals come out of solution from the heat and form scale that coats the cooling system and can clog the radiator. If your anti-freeze corrosion inhibitor package gets depleted (within 2 years) the minerals can react with the depleted additives and make even more and worse scale.

Quote:

Originally Posted by Stallacrew

Get a gallon of water and a gallon of coolant from walmarket. It'll only cost like 87 cents more than the coolant.....

Be careful, at least in my area (Southern Maryland), Walmart and a lot of the auto stores don't sell the conventional old green anti-freeze. Instead they sell "All Makes & All Color" Anti-Freeze, which is NOT conventional old green anti-freeze its Dex-Cool or one of the OAT derivatives just dyed green. In bold letters on the front of the bottle it says its compatible with all anti-freezes, but turn the bottle around and read the fine print on the back, it will tell you its compatible, provided you completely drain the system and flush it with fresh water until all traces of your old anti-freeze is gone.

Considering the disaster Dex-Cool has been, especially when mixed with old green anti-freeze and how it doesn't protect metals like lead, solder and brass that is often in older cooling systems, as well, softens some types of seals and plastics, this highly irresponsible by many manufacturers that seem to be trying to fool you into buying dex-cool dyed green, when you think your getting the original green formula anti-freeze .

I tried to order Zerex Conventional Green Anti-freeze and have it delivered, but it was too expensive with shipping. I was on my way to buy G-05 to retro-fit in the Jeep, when I found that my local Auto-Zone just started carrying Peak original green formula anti-freeze (it has phosphate and silicates listed in the ingredients and NO 2-EHA).

Read the ingredients on the bottle, if there is Phosphates and Silicates in the ingredients, then its old conventional green anti-freeze. If there is NO Phosphates and Silicates, and it contains 2-Ethylhexanoic Acidor 2-EHAthen its Dex-Cool. Put the bottle down and walk away.

Dex-Cool is bad, many of the Japanese and some of the European makes have a version of OAT Anti-Freeze that doesn't use 2-EHA, which isn't bad, but if you have to retro-fit to one of the newer anti-freezes, then G-05 is your best choice.

G-05 is Hybrid OAT or HOAT. It does NOT have the 2-EHA, and contains a lot of the inhibitors that the original green has in it, like silicates. This is what Chrysler and Ford has switched over too and they have been using in Mercedes and other European vehicles for years. Unlike Dex-Cool, it mixes with the old green (although its NOT recommended in large amounts, but just a little left over after draining your system and flushing it with fresh water would be perfectly fine). If you mix it, make sure to use the shorter change cycle of the other anti-freeze, those additives could form solids that hurt the system if you take it out too the 5 years of the G-05.

Never mix the Dex-Cool with other anti-freezes, even small amounts. Its additives chemically react with that of the other anti-freezes and can form solids hurting your water pump.


Notice the "All Makes, All Models, Mixes with any color anti-freeze", BS! Don't buy this crap if you can't find original green anti-freeze that lists Phosphates and Silicates in the ingredients, then convert to G-05.


Last edited by Rick Anderson; August 18th, 2008 at 20:01.

Sours: https://www.naxja.org/forum/showthread.php?t=964265
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Jeep XJ Cherokee 4.0L Water Pump, Thermostat & Fan Clutch Replacement Write-Up

Earlier in the year, our 1997 Jeep XJ Cherokee developed a coolant leak that was small enough to ignore for a while but over time, it grew to the point that I knew it needed to be addressed. Hoping that it was just a loose lower hose clamp or cracked hose, I started there but as luck would have it, everything was tight and the hose was in good enough condition to not be the source of the leak. Needless to say, the coolant was most likely oozing out of the water pump weep hole and that meant it was time for it to be replaced. Fortunately, a Jeep 4.0L water pump is a common part, can be found at just about any autoparts store and for cheap. And, since I was going to have to pull a lot other parts to get to it, I decided to use the opportunity to replace the thermostat and fan clutch at the same time too. If you're in need of replacing your XJ's water pump, this step by step write-up should be able to help you out.

What you will need
• Jeep XJ Cherokee 4.0L Water Pump & Gasket
• Jeep XJ Cherokee 4.0L Thermostat & Gasket
• Jeep XJ Cherokee 4.0L Fan Clutch
• 8, 13, 15mm Sockets & Wrenches
• 1/2" Wrench
• Ratchet
• Ratchet Extension
• Flathead Screwdriver
• Phillips Screwdriver
• Hammer
• Gasket Scraper
• Teflon Tape
• Bench Vice
• Wire Brush
• Emery Cloth
• Coolant
• Bucket
• Paper Towels

Shot of all the new parts I got.
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Here's a shot of the coolant leak I was seeing under my XJ.
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Instructions
1. Start off by disconnecting your air intake tube from the air box. To do this, simply lift up on the plastic clamp and pull back as shown in the photo below.
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2. Firmly grasp the PCV tube and wriggle it free from the port on the air box.
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3. Release the 3 clamps securing the lid of your air box.
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4. Remove the air filter and then remove the air box lid.
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5. Using a 13mm socket and ratchet extension, remove the 2 bolts and 1 nut securing the air box to the body of your Jeep.
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6. Remove the air box from your Jeep and set it aside.
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7. Using an 8mm socket, remove the 2 screws securing both your radiator overflow hose and electric fan to the front of your Jeep.
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8. Take the plug for your electric fan, slide the lock tab out and then separate the ends by squeezing on the release tab.
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9. Wriggle the radiator overflow hose off the radiator fill neck.
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10. Lift the electric fan up and out of your Jeep's engine compartment.
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11. Using an 8mm socket, remove the 2 screws securing the fan shroud to the front of your Jeep.
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12. Carefully lift the fan shroud up and out of your Jeep's engine compartment. You will have to work it around the mechanical fan and fan clutch and you'll want to take care not to bump into the fins of your radiator as you do this.
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13. Using a 15mm socket, loosen the bolt securing your idler pulling in place.
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14. Using a 15mm socket, loosen the serpentine belt adjuster as shown in this photo.
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15. If you no longer have a diagram of your serpentine belt on the fan shroud, take a moment to photograph it with your phone. You can use it as a reference when reinstalling it later.
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16. Remove your serpentine belt and examine it carefully. If it shows signs of cracking especially across the grain, you should plan on replacing it. If it's still in good shape, set it aside for now.
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17. Using a 15mm socket, remove the 2 bolts securing the front of your power steering pump bracket to the water pump housing.
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18. Using a 15mm socket, remove the bolt securing the power steering pump support brace to the engine block.
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19. Using a 13mm socket and ratchet extension, remove the 3 bolts securing the power steering pump to the intake manifold. You will need to rotate the pulley so that the 2 openings allow access to them.
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20. With the power steering pump free of the engine block, pull it aside and rest it on the fender well to give you more room to work with.
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21. Using a phillips screwdriver, remove the 2 screws securing the head light bezels to the front of your Jeep.
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22. Remove the bezels and set them aside.
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23. Using a phillips screwdriver, remove the 4 screws securing the plastic grill to the front of your Jeep.
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24. Remove the grill and set it aside.
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25. On the passenger side of your Jeep, use a phillips screwdriver to remove the 2 screws securing your indicator light in place.
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26. Place a bucket underneath your Jeep and open up the petcock valve to drain the radiator. This valve is located behind where your passenger side indicator light was.
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27. Allow your radiator to drain completely before proceeding.
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28. If your lower radiator hose is secured to the water pump with a hose clamp, use a flat head screw driver to loose up the clamp.
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29. Move your bucket underneath your water pump, carefully pry off the lower radiator hose and allow it to drain into the bucket.
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30. On your Jeep's thermostat housing, take a hold of the temperature sensor plug, slide the lock tab to the open position and unplug it by squeezing on the release tab and pulling it off.
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31. Use a flat head screw driver to loosen the hose clamp securing the heater hose to the thermostat housing and then pull it off.
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32. Use a flat head screw driver to loosen the hose clamp securing the upper radiator hose to the thermostat housing and then pull it off.
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33. Use a flat head screw driver to loosen the hose clamp securing the heater hose to the tube extending off the water pump and then pull it off.
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34. Use a 13mm socket to remove the 2 bolts securing the thermostat housing to the engine block.
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35. Pry the thermostat housing off the engine block.
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36. Use a flathead screw driver to help pry off the thermostat from the engine block.
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37. Using a 13mm and a 1/2" wrench, remove the 4 nuts securing the mechanical fan and clutch to the pulley. You can use one of the wrenches to hold the pulley in place while using the other to remove the bolts as shown.
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38. Carefully remove the fan from the pulley studs being careful not to hit the radiator.
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39. Using a 13mm and a 1/2" wrench, remove the 4 bolts securing the water pump pulley. As before, you can use one of the wrenches to hold the pulley in place while using the other to remove the bolts as shown.
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40. Using a 13mm socket, remove the 3 bolts securing your water pump to the engine block.
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41. Using a hammer, give the back side of the water pump lower hose connector a tap to free it of its gasket bond and then allow the remaining coolant to drain as shown.
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42. Remove the water pump, place it in a bench vice and then, using a 19mm wrench, remove the heater hose tube.
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Sours: https://www.wayalife.com/threads/jeep-xj-cherokee-4-0l-water-pump-thermostat-fan-clutch-replacement-write-up.30583/
Burping Your Coolant - Jeep Cherokee XJ - The Roadhouse

1996 Jeep Cherokee - Antifreeze - Vehicle Specific

Your engine coolant, also called antifreeze, serves several purposes. First, it is circulated throughout the engine to the radiator to keep your engine at a stable operating temperature. Low coolant levels can lead to overheating, which can damage your engine. Second, antifreeze has a lower freezing point than water, which keeps it in a fluid state during cold weather. Coolant also keeps corrosion down inside the engine that may be caused by water. If you notice a coolant leak, it should be taken care of as soon as possible to avoid damage to your engine. You may notice your temperature gauge reading higher than usual, your heater may stop working, or you also notice steam under your hood. When you need coolant, visit O'Reilly Auto Parts for the right coolant for your vehicle. We carry a variety of coolant made for your car, truck, or SUV.

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Coolant jeep xj

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95 Cherokee Cooling System Flush and Starter Replacement

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