Combat comic

Combat comic DEFAULT

War comics

War comics is a genre of comic books that gained popularity in English-speaking countries following World War II.

History[edit]

American war comics[edit]

Shortly after the birth of the modern comic book in the mid- to late 1930s, comics publishers began including stories of wartime adventures in the multi-genre omnibus titles then popular as a format. Even prior to the U.S. involvement in World War II after the attack at Pearl Harbor, Hawaii, comic books such as Captain America Comics #1 (March 1941) depicted superheroes fighting Adolf Hitler and the Nazis.

Golden Age publisher Quality Comics debuted its title Blackhawk in 1944; the title was published more or less continuously until the mid-1980s.

In the post-World War II era, comic books devoted solely to war stories began appearing and gained popularity in the United States and Canada through the 1950s, the 1960s, and 1970s, i.e. covering the time periods of the Korean War and the Vietnam War. The titles tended to concentrate on US military events, generally in World War II, the Korean War, and the Vietnam War. Most publishers produced anthologies; industry giant DC Comics' war comics included such long-running titles as All-American Men of War, Our Army at War, Our Fighting Forces, and Star Spangled War Stories. Another prolific publisher of war comics was Charlton Comics, which produced a wide variety of titles beginning in the 1950s, such as Battlefield Action, Fightin' Army, and Fightin' Marines. Quality also began publishing G.I. Combat during this era. Marvel Comics also produced war titles, notably Sgt. Fury and his Howling Commandos.

In contrast to the typical glamorizing approach of most war titles, the EC Comics titles Frontline Combat and Two-Fisted Tales (produced in the early 1950s) depicted the horrors of war realistically and in great detail, exposing what editor Harvey Kurtzman saw as the truth about war without idealizing it. (The mid-1960s black-and-white comics magazine Blazing Combat, produced by Warren Publishing, was similarly devoted to authentically drawn and researched combat stories with a self-professed anti-war slant.)

Around 1959, several recurring characters began to appear in mainstream comic lines, including Sgt. Rock and The Haunted Tank in the DC line. These recurring characters began as regular "guests" of anthology titles such as Our Army at War and later graduated to their own titles.

End of the Silver Age[edit]

By the late 1980s, a great number of venerable war titles (most of which were either anthologies or else World War II-themed titles) from the late 1950s and 1960s "Silver Age of Comic Books" died out. War comics series that ended long runs in the 1980s, following publication of over 100 issues, include:

  • Blackhawk (Quality/DC, 273 issues from 1944 to 1984)
  • Fightin' Army (Charlton, 157 issues from 1956 to 1984)[1]
  • Fightin' Marines (Charlton, 163 issues from 1955 to 1984)[1]
  • G.I. Combat (Quality/DC, 288 issues from 1952 to 1987)
  • Our Fighting Forces (DC, 181 issues from 1954 to 1978)
  • Sgt. Fury and his Howling Commandos (Marvel, 167 issues from 1963 to 1981)
  • Sgt. Rock (DC – includes a retitling of the earlier Our Army at War, the combined run was 422 issues from 1952 to 1988)[2]
  • Unknown Soldier (DC – a retitling of Star Spangled War Stories that ran from 1952 to 1977, then continued as The Unknown Soldier from 1977 to 1982, with number 268 the final issue).
  • Weird War Tales (DC, 124 issues from 1971 to 1983)[3]

New titles were still appearing, however – notable among these being Marvel's the 'Nam, which debuted in 1987 and was based during the first year on writer Doug Murray's actual Vietnam experiences (through the eyes of fictional character Ed Marks). Murray was surprised that his proposal for a Vietnam-war themed comic was accepted during this period: "I never expected anything to come of it because war books were already pretty much dead at that point in 1985."[4] Another notable war comic focused on Vietnam was Don Lomax's Vietnam Journal, published by Apple Comics from 1987 to 1991.

Also from Marvel in the 1980s was the toy tie-in G.I. Joe: A Real American Hero which focused on a fictional counter-terrorist team in a contemporary setting, and a limited run of Tales of the Marine Corps, similar in tone and style to Charlton's Fightin' line of war anthologies.

British war comics[edit]

Black and white anthology stories were popular in Britain in the 1960s and early 1970s. Examples include Commando Comics and weekly comics such as Battle Picture Weekly, The Victor, and Warlord.

Reprints[edit]

Trade paperback reprint collections of war comics include:

  • Blackhawk Archives Vol. 1 (reprints "Blackhawk" stories from Military Comics #1–17)
  • Enemy Ace Archives Vol. 1 (reprints "Enemy Ace" stories from Showcase #57, 58, Star-Spangled War Stories #138–142)
  • Enemy Ace Archives Vol. 2 (reprints Star-Spangled War Stories #143–145, 147–150, 152, 181–183, 200)
  • The Losers by Jack Kirby (reprints Our Fighting Forces #151–162)
  • Marvel Masterworks Sgt. Fury Vol. 1 (reprints Sgt. Fury and his Howling Commandos #1–13)
  • Marvel Masterworks Sgt. Fury Vol. 2 (reprints Sgt. Fury and his Howling Commandos #14–23, Annual #1)
  • Sgt. Rock Archives Vol. 1 (reprints G.I. Combat #68, Our Army at War #81–96)
  • Sgt. Rock Archives Vol. 2 (reprints Our Army at War #97–110)
  • Sgt. Rock Archives Vol. 3 (reprints Our Army at War #111–125)
  • Showcase Presents Blackhawk Vol. 1 (reprints Blackhawk #108–127)
  • Showcase Presents Enemy Ace Vol. 1 (reprints "Enemy Ace" stories from Our Army at War #151, 153, 155, Showcase #57–58, Star-Spangled War Stories #138–152, 158, 181–183, and 200, Detective Comics #404, Men at War #1–3, 8–10, 12–14, 19–20, The Unknown Soldier #252–253, 260–261, 265–267, DC Special #26)
  • Showcase Presents The Haunted Tank Vol. 1 (reprints "The Haunted Tank" stories from G.I. Combat #87–119, The Brave and the Bold #52, Our Army at War #155)
  • Showcase Presents The Haunted Tank Vol. 2 (reprints "The Haunted Tank" stories from G.I. Combat #120–157)
  • Showcase Presents Sgt. Rock Vol. 1 (reprints "Sgt. Rock" stories from Our Army at War #81–117)
  • Showcase Presents Sgt. Rock Vol. 2 (reprints "Sgt. Rock" stories from Our Army at War #118–148)
  • Showcase Presents The Unknown Soldier Vol. 1 (reprints "Unknown Soldier" stories from Star-Spangled War Stories #151–190)
  • Showcase Presents The War that Time Forgot Vol. 1 (reprints "The War that Time Forgot" stories from Star-Spangled War Stories #90–137)

See also[edit]

References[edit]

Further reading[edit]

  • Conroy, Mike (2009). War Comics: A Graphic History. foreword by Garth Ennis. ILEX Press. p. 192. ISBN .
  • Riches, Adam (2009). When the Comics Went to War. Mainstream Publishing. p. 256. ISBN .
  • Altarriba Ordonez, Antonio. "War Comics: the New Realism". The UNESCO Courier. 52 (7): 61.
  • Duffy, Chris; et al. (2014). Above the Dreamless Dead: World War I in Poetry and Comics. First Second. ISBN .
  • Scott, Cord A. (2014). Comics and Conflict: Patriotism and Propaganda from WWII Through Operation Iraqi Freedom. Naval Institute Press. ISBN .

External links[edit]

Sours: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/War_comics

G.I Combat Comic Book Price Guide

DC Comics // January 1957 - March 1987
Issue count: 245

DC's G.I. Combat remains a favorite among War comic collectors. Several key issues are rising in value! Issue #87 has the first appearance of the popular feature HAUNTED TANK! Check what prices key issues are fetching by using Quality Comix's price guide!

Skip To:Issue 1 - 50Issue 51 - 100Issue 101 - 150
G.I. Combat

Taking over the title and issue numbering after purchasing the rights from Quality Comics, DC, with issue #44 made this popular war series it's own.

As with most of DC's war titles, the top-notch writing and excellently dynamic artwork by war mainstays such as Russ Heath, Ruben Moreira, Ross Andru, and of course Joe Kubert make G.I. Combat a growing concern on the collector's market!

This is the book that with issue #87, introduced the fan-favorite Haunted Tank series, which would continue for many, many years.

Looking to sell an G.I Combat issue or a collection of comics you own? Browse our wide selection of G.I. Combat comic price guides by issue. Get a ballpark estimate of the value of your comic based on its grading and condition. We have been buying and selling for 20 years and have tons of experience working with sellers just like you! Get in touch for a FREE appraisal.

Read More

Looking to sell your comic books?

Browse our selection of key issues from G.I Combat Comic Book Price Guide below to get an instant estimate of their value.

We have been buying and selling for 20 years and have tons of experience working with sellers just like you!

Get Your Free Appraisal

Key Art: Comic Book Price Guide

Issue #44

What's G.I. Combat #44 worth in 2021?

The highest recorded sale of issue 44 in existence (or once on the market) has a 9.0 CGC VF/NM and sold for $2,629 in 2007. A lower grade copy of this issue in the 3.0 CGC GD/VG mark has sold for $150 in 2013, so good luck catching such a rarity.

Why is this comic book valuable?

In issue number 44 of G.I. Combat, there's war stories such as The Eagle and The Wolves, An Inch of Sand, Military Mascots, I've Been Here Before, Whaleboats Go To War, and The Brave Tank.

Price Guide Report

GD 2.0VG 4.0FN 6.0VF 8.0NM 9.4RECORD SALE!
$150$300$600$1,250$5,000$2,629

Sell G.I. Combat #44

Issue #67

What's G.I. Combat #67 worth in 2021?

The highest recorded sale of issue 67 in existence (or once on the market) has a 9.0 CGC VF/NM and sold for $896 in 2011. A lower grade copy of this issue in the 4.0 CGC VG mark has sold for $50 in 2013, so good luck snagging this rare comic.

Why is this comic book valuable?

In issue number 67 of G.I Combat, it marks the first appearance of Tank Killer. There's war stories such as Air Guards, Birds of War, and Where's Beach Red.

Price Guide Report

GD 2.0VG 4.0FN 6.0VF 8.0NM 9.4RECORD SALE!
$50$100$200$400$1,400$896

Sell G.I. Combat #67

Issue #68

What's G.I. Combat #68 worth in 2021?

The highest recorded sale of issue 68 in existence (or once on the market) has a 8.0 CGC VF and sold for $1,434 in 2018. A lower grade copy of this issue in the 2.5 CGC GD+ mark has sold for $199 in 2018, so it's likely you can afford it for your collection.

Why is this comic book valuable?

In issue number 68 of G.I Combat, there's war stories such as Equal To The Task, Formula For Success!, Air Force "Operations", and Battle Flare.

Price Guide Report

GD 2.0VG 4.0FN 6.0VF 8.0NM 9.4RECORD SALE!
$200$400$750$1,400$5,500$3,107

Sell G.I. Combat #68

Issue #69

What's G.I. Combat #69 worth in 2021?

G.I. Combat #69 first was released in December 1958. The highest-graded issue is 9.2 and sold for $1,315 in 2011. A 5.5 graded copy sold for $26 in 2009, and a 7.5 graded copy sold for $336 recently, a decrease from the average in 2017 when it sold for $383.

Why is this comic book valuable?

The main story in the G.I. Combat #69 issue is The Steel Ribbon! It's in the war genre and features an unnamed Marine, pilot, and G.I. Jerry Grandenetti seems to have reworked the cover page for Our Fighting Forces #71. It includes a full page ad for Flash #105.

Price Guide Report

GD 2.0VG 4.0FN 6.0VF 8.0NM 9.4RECORD SALE!
$65$125$250$500$2,000$1,325

Sell G.I. Combat #69

Issue #83

What's G.I. Combat #83 worth in 2021?

G.I. Combat #83 was first released in the summer of 1960. There are only 30 copies of this issue available currently. Its most recent price was $80 for an FN 6.0. The highest-graded copy of 9.2 sold for its highest amount in 2011 - $1.434.

Why is this comic book valuable?

G.I. Combat #83 includes the first appearance of Big Al, Little Al, and Charlie Cigar. This Superman National DC Comics issue has several advertisements, including one for the Flash and Green Lantern.

Price Guide Report

GD 2.0VG 4.0FN 6.0VF 8.0NM 9.4RECORD SALE!
$50$100$200$400$1,600$1,425

Sell G.I. Combat #83

Issue #87

What's G.I. Combat #87 worth in 2021?

G.I. Combat #87 is valued at $1,000 for a signature series FN 6.0 copy that was signed by Russ Heath. Its value in 2018 was about the same. It was published in 1961 in color. The highest-graded issue (8.5) was valued at $3,884 in 2011. There are 155 copies available today, with 9 being from the signature series.

Why is this comic book valuable?

This edition of the comic featured humor, non-fiction, and advocacy elements. The first part was reprinted five times, and the Private Pete comic story was a reprint from Star Spangled War Stories of 1952. It featured actual military advertisements.

Price Guide Report

GD 2.0VG 4.0FN 6.0VF 8.0NM 9.4RECORD SALE!
$330$600$1,250$2,500$10,000$3,875

Sell G.I. Combat #87

Issue #91

What's G.I. Combat #91 worth in 2021?

G.I. Combat #91 came out in the winter of 1961. Its highest-graded copy (9.0) sold for $2,280 recently. The FN 6.0 condition copy is valued at $163 today, based on the most recent sale, up from its 2017 average of $138. There are 62 total copies available, with 3 of them being from the signature series.

Why is this comic book valuable?

This issue features the first Haunted Tank cover. This attractive cover appears to have been reworked into the G.I. Combat #112 cover.

Price Guide Report

GD 2.0VG 4.0FN 6.0VF 8.0NM 9.4RECORD SALE!
$75$150$300$700$2,800$2,280

Sell G.I. Combat #91

Issue #114

What's G.I. Combat #114 worth in 2021?

G.I. Combat #114 was published in 1965. The most recent amount an FN 6.0 sold for was $100. A 9.6 graded copy sold for $1,763 in 2018. There are 66 copies available now, with only 2 from the signature series.

Why is this comic book valuable?

G.I. Combat #114 is where you get the origin story of the Haunted Tank. This was reprinted as Showcase Presents: Haunted Tank (DC, 2006 Series) and tells how Lt. Stuart and his crew landed in North Africa for the first time and learned to fight, told from the perspective of General J.E.B. Stuart.

Price Guide Report

GD 2.0VG 4.0FN 6.0VF 8.0NM 9.4RECORD SALE!
$50$50$200$400$1,400$1,775

Sell G.I. Combat #114

Sours: https://www.qualitycomix.com/comic-price-guide/gi-combat
  1. Robux logo new
  2. B16 iacv
  3. Bradenton beach horses
  4. Definition of feathers

G.I. Combat

American war comic (1952-87; 2012)

G.I. Combat

G.I. Combat #168 (January 1974).
Cover art by Neal Adams.

PublisherQuality Comics (1952–56)
DC Comics (1957–1987, 2012–2013)
ScheduleMonthly:
#1–78, #158–170
#175–200, #221–277
Bimonthly:
#79–157, #171–175
#201–220, #278–288
FormatOngoing series
GenreWar
Publication dateVol. 1: October 1952–March 1987
Vol. 2: July 2012– February 2013
No. of issuesVol. 1: 288
Vol. 2: 8 (#1–7 plus issue numbered 0)
Main character(s)The Haunted Tank
Written by
Penciller(s)
Inker(s)
Editor(s)

G.I. Combat was an American comics anthology featuring war stories. It was published from 1952 until 1956 by Quality Comics, followed by DC Comics until its final issue in 1987. In 2012 it was briefly revived.

Publication history[edit]

The focus was on stories about American soldiers or G.I.s. Initially, the stories involved Cold War adventures with strong anti-Communist themes, but over time the focus shifted to tales from World War II, and most of the stories after Quality ceased publishing the title were set during this period. As with other media, the World War II setting was sometimes used to discuss themes pertinent to contemporary conflicts such as the Vietnam War.

The first issue of G.I. Combat was published in October 1952.[1][2] When DC Comics acquired the rights to the Quality Comics characters and titles, they continued publishing the series starting with issue #44 (January 1957).[3]G.I. Combat and Blackhawk were the only Quality titles which DC continued publishing. Many notable writers and artists worked on G.I. Combat during its run, including Robert Kanigher, who also edited the title, Joe Kubert, Jerry Grandenetti and Neal Adams.

Each issue of G.I. Combat contained several short comic stories, a format that continued throughout its run. There were several recurring features in the DC Comics version of the title, including most notably "The Haunted Tank", which first appeared in issue #87 (May 1961)[4] and ran until 1987. The Losers' first appearance as a group was with the Haunted Tank crew in issue #138 (Oct.-Nov. 1969),[5] in a story titled "The Losers". Other recurring features included "The Bravos of Vietnam" (about U.S. Marines in the Vietnam War) and late in its run, a return to Cold War themes with a short-lived recurring feature about 1980s mercenaries. Beginning with issue #201 (April–May 1977), G.I. Combat was DC's only war comic to be upgraded to its "Dollar Comics" line, with additional pages of content beyond the then-standard 32-page format. The Dollar Comic format was used through issue #259 (November 1983).[6] The series continued in a 52-page giant-sized format through issue #281 (January 1986)[7] before returning to a standard 32 page size with #282 (March 1986).[8]

The Monitor's first full appearance was in G.I. Combat #274 (February 1985).[9] By the 1980s, war comics grew less marketable and Sgt. Rock, The Unknown Soldier, and Weird War Tales were discontinued. G.I. Combat's final issue was #288 (March 1987).

2012 series[edit]

DC launched a new G.I. Combat ongoing series (cover dated July 2012) as part of The New 52.[10] Featured stories included "The War that Time Forgot" by writer J. T. Krul and artist Ariel Olivetti, with back up stories starring the Unknown Soldier by writers Justin Gray and Jimmy Palmiotti with art by Dan Panosian.[11] The Haunted Tank feature began in issue #5.[12] The new series was canceled as of issue #7 on sale in December 2012 and cover dated February 2013.[13][14]

Collected editions[edit]

  • Sgt. Rock Archives Vol. 1 includes G.I. Combat #68, 240 pages, May 2002, ISBN 978-1-56389-841-9
  • America at War includes G.I. Combat #87: "Introducing -- the Haunted Tank" by Robert Kanigher and Russ Heath, 247 pages, July 1979, ISBN 978-0671249533
  • Showcase Presents: Haunted Tank
  • DC Through the 80s: The End of Eras collects G.I. Combat #288, 520 pages, December 2020, ISBN 978-1779500878
  • G.I. Combat Vol. 1: The War That Time Forgot collects G.I. Combat vol. 2 #0-7, 224 pages, April 2013, ISBN 978-1-4012-3853-7

References[edit]

  1. ^G.I. Combat (Quality Comics) at the Grand Comics Database
  2. ^Overstreet, Robert M. (2019). Overstreet Comic Book Price Guide (49th ed.). Timonium, Maryland: Gemstone Publishing. p. 722. ISBN .
  3. ^G.I. Combat (DC Comics) at the Grand Comics Database
  4. ^McAvennie, Michael; Dolan, Hannah, ed. (2010). "1960s". DC Comics Year By Year A Visual Chronicle. London, United Kingdom: Dorling Kindersley. p. 103. ISBN . CS1 maint: extra text: authors list (link)
  5. ^McAvennie "1960s" in Dolan, p. 135: "Scribe Robert Kanigher and artist Russ Heath turned these self-described Losers - including "Navajo Ace" Johnny Cloud of the U.S. Army Air Force, Marines Gunner Mackey and Sarge Clay, and Captain William Storm, a PT boat commander with a prosthetic leg - into a fighting force that meshed as one".
  6. ^Romero, Max (July 2012). "I'll Buy That For a Dollar! DC Comics' Dollar Comics". Back Issue!. Raleigh, North Carolina: TwoMorrows Publishing (57): 39–41.
  7. ^"G.I. Combat #281". Grand Comics Database.
  8. ^"G.I. Combat #282". Grand Comics Database.
  9. ^Kanigher, Robert (w), Glanzman, Sam (p), Glanzman, Sam (i). "Death March" G.I. Combat 274 (February 1985)
  10. ^Moore, Matt (May 2, 2012). "DC adds 6 new titles, including modern G.I. Combat". Yahoo! News. Archived from the original on July 2, 2012. Retrieved November 3, 2012.
  11. ^Kushins, Josh (January 12, 2012). "DC Comics in 2012-–-Introducing the "Second Wave" of DC Comics The New 52". The Source. DC Comics. Archived from "second-wave"-of-dc-comics-the-new-52/ the original on January 15, 2012. Retrieved January 14, 2012.
  12. ^Tomasi, Peter (w), Chaykin, Howard (p), Chaykin, Howard (i). "Mettle" G.I. Combat v2, 5 (December 2012)
  13. ^Johnston, Rich (September 17, 2012). "DC Comics Cancels G.I. Combat With Issue Seven". Bleeding Cool. Archived from the original on October 22, 2012. Retrieved November 3, 2012.
  14. ^Langshaw, Mark (September 18, 2012). "G.I. Combat canceled by DC Comics". Digital Spy. Archived from the original on October 14, 2012. Retrieved November 3, 2012.

External links[edit]

Sours: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/G.I._Combat
Marvel Super Hero Squad: Comic Combat Walkthrough FULL GAME Longplay (PS3, X360, Wii)

I have never had a chick between my boobs. I got up, she squeezed her breasts and I started to have, and she tried to lick my penis. I could not finish, well, as always. Then I say: Let's try in the ass.

Comic combat

Both come here. Two furies flew in, ready to protect their daughter from any enemy. - What. What happened. Marinka sat up on the bed.

Mortal Kombat (1992) Audio Comic

Did you notice that. Will she answer the question about blocking Valrisa. Of course. But I dont understand why.

You will also like:

The rich smell of semen hit my nose, and I immediately realized that if you shoot, then shoot quickly. The more I hesitate, the longer it will take. I pulled the panties down. Wet shin track. Seed stain on sandals.



307 308 309 310 311