Task manager ram

Task manager ram DEFAULT
  1. Press Ctrl + Shift + Esc keys together to open Task Manager
  2. On the Processes Tab click on the Memory column header so the arrow is facing down
  3. Wait for your system to be at rest
  4. Then please provide a screenshot of the Task Manager Window
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MSI GV72 - 17.3", i7-8750H (Hex Core), 32GB DDR4, 4GB GeForce GTX 1050 Ti, 256GB NVMe M2, 2TB HDD

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here's the pic.

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Well in the first screenshot, there is nothing of concern there, Firefox seems to be using the most memory, but this is normal . . .

Please expand out the second screenshot, there does seem to be an issue there . . .

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here is the expand of second screenshot...

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Well, I am going to assume you have no dedicated graphics card, just on-board graphics (Intel HD Graphics or the ATI equivalent)

So I would have to say that everything seems normal

User - 42%

System - 21%

Windows 10 (including user profile) in general uses 1.5GB - 2GB RAM when idle, the only thing I would suggest would be to install more RAM if you feel your require it. But from the screenshots you provided, you have about 1.48GB RAM available, which is more than enough for normal PC usage . . .

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Sours: https://answers.microsoft.com/en-us/windows/forum/all/ram-usage-at-task-manager-too-high/37a56e53-3c35-4f60-a70b-596e88ed8745

Measuring memory use with Task Manager

You may wish to know how much memory is used by your GEMPACK simulation. The instructions below show how to do this on Windows using Task Manager.

When memory (RAM) is short, Windows is able to use hard disk space instead (called "paging") -- at the cost of a severe speed reduction. If your GEMPACK program is starved of RAM it will run very slowly. Also, the operating system and background processes consume quite a bit of memory. Use Task Manager, as follows, to investigate how much memory is required to meet background needs, and to run one simulation. If you have enough memory, you may be able to run two or more simulations at once.

Starting Task Manager

Close all programs, then open email and a small Word document (small tasks you might want to do while a simulation was running). Right-click on the task bar (normally at the bottom of screen) and activate Task Manager. Select the Performance tab. You should see something like:

Task Manager

The red circles indicate items of interest:

  • Total physical memory is 2000MB or 2GB.
  • 40 processes are running.
  • 348 MB of memory is being used.

Thus, Windows is using considerable resources in the background before you even start trying to run a large simulation !

Now start a large GEMPACK simulation running. Then, in Task Manager, select the Processes tab. You should see something like:

Task Manager

Click once or twice on the "Mem usage" column heading to bring your GEMPACK program to the top, and see how much memory it is using. In this example, GTAP.EXE is using 503 megabytes to do a 60-region, 57 sector simulation (similar information will be found near the end of your solution log file). With the 348MB background requirement, 851 MB is needed in total. More regions or sectors would require more RAM.

Such a large simulation will not be quick: you will be strongly tempted to put your multi-core CPU to work. You could do this by manually launching two or more simulations at once; for recursive dynamic models the RunDynam shell program will automate the processs. In this case, no one simulation is faster, but the total job is done sooner. In contrast, GEMPACK 10 or later allows for parallel processing to speed up a single simulation: it splits up one simulation into parts. You can specify how many additional jobs (called 'servants') are created. In each case:

  • Two processors will do two tasks in about the same time as one processor would do one task. It might take 50% longer (than this 'same time') for two processors to do three tasks. There is no point in launching more tasks than you have processors.
  • Each running simulation needs its own memory (in this example, 503MB). So two simulations (plus the background requirement) will need about 1350MB (or 1.5GB) of RAM. If, in addition, you were trying to do large Excel calculations, you might find that 2GB of RAM was insufficient.


Related topics:
Reducing Simulation Time
Condensation and Solution Speed
Not Enough Memory to Solve a Model
Memory Limit for GEMPACK
64-bit computing and parallel computations with GEMPACK 10
Should I move to 64-bit Windows?
Choosing a new PC for GEMPACK simulations


Go back to
GEMPACK FAQ Page


Sours: https://www.copsmodels.com/gp-taskman.htm
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When you use up all of the available RAM on your computer, you may notice that your device struggles to complete tasks. If you find that your computer’s applications are frequently crashing and it takes longer to do simple tasks, then you might be wondering how to free up RAM on your computer.

graphic that shows a ram memory chip

What is RAM?

Your computer’s Random Access Memory (RAM) is stored on a memory chip that is typically found on the motherboard. This where your computer stores short term data. RAM is the hub of storage for all active and running programs and processes. Your computer uses the information it has stored in RAM to complete tasks while simultaneously receiving and performing other functions.

When you use up all of the available RAM memory, your computer’s performance can slow down because it doesn’t have the storage required to complete its tasks. When you clear RAM space, it gives your computer the capability to carry out tasks. Depending on your computer, there are a few different ways you can free up RAM space.

How to Make the Most of Your RAM

It can be easy to use up your RAM because it supports so many functions. Before you start removing programs from your computer, try these quick fixes to free up RAM space.

Restart Your Computer

The first thing you can try to free up RAM is restarting your computer. When you restart or turn off your computer, all of your RAM (stored data) will be wiped clean and programs will be rebooted. This can potentially clear out some processes and programs that are running behind the scenes, taking up your RAM storage.

Update Your Software

It’s important to be running the most updated versions of your computer software and applications. Older renditions of software and apps can take more memory to process, causing your computer to slow down.

graphic that shows different browsers

Try a Different Browser

Something else you can try is changing browsers, as some have been known to use more data than others. If you’re not already, try using a browser like Chrome or Firefox, which are typically good browsers for memory management.

Clear Your Cache

If you still find yourself short on RAM, the next option is to try deleting your cache. Sometimes your cache can take up a lot of space because it uses RAM for memory functions. The cache holds on to information that your computer uses to reload pages it has seen before rather than downloading them again. This can save you time when browsing, but if you are short on RAM, it’s something you can sacrifice with minimal effect.

Remove Browser Extensions

Many of your daily work and home computer operations have been made easy by the use of browser extensions. However, they also require memory, so you might want to think about disabling or removing your extensions.

5 Ways to Free up RAM on Windows 10

If you are still having trouble freeing up your RAM storage, you might have too many programs and applications without even knowing. Try these five ways to free up RAM storage for Windows 10 computers.

1. Track Memory and Clean Up Processes

screenshot of how to free up ram on windows device step 1

You should monitor your computer RAM usage so that you don’t deplete your supply before you really need it. To monitor your computer’s memory, you can navigate to the task manager to check the processes. This is where you’ll be able to see which programs are running and what kind of space they are taking up.

To locate your computer memory:

  1. Hold the Ctrl+Alt+Del keys to open the Task Manager.
  2. Select the “Processes” tab.
  3. Click the “Memory” column to view how much space they are taking up.

You can now see which of your programs are taking up the most time and space on your computer. If you find anything suspicious eating up your memory, you should delete programs you don’t need or use.

2. Disable Startup Programs You Don’t Need

screenshot of how to free up ram on windows device step 2

If you have used your computer for at least a few years, then you have probably downloaded a fair amount of software that you either forgot about or no longer use. After the processes tab tells you which programs use the most space, you will want to maneuver to the startup tab to stop those you no longer need.

To disable startup programs:

  1. Select the “Startup” tab from the Task Manager.
  2. Click “Startup impact” to organize the programs from high to low usage.
  3. Right-click to disable any programs that you don’t need.

Startup programs are those that activate when your computer is booted up. When these programs start, each one takes up a little bit of RAM in the background without your consent. After a while, all of the software and programs can add up. Be sure that the ones that aren’t needed are disabled or removed.

3. Stop Running Background Apps

screenshot of how to free up ram on windows device step 3

The next items that could be taking up RAM are your applications that are set to automatically run in the background. You may have used your computer for years before noticing some of these apps taking up your RAM storage. This can quickly exhaust your memory, battery, and data bandwidth.

To stop background apps:

  1. Go to computer settings.
  2. Click the “Privacy” category.
  3. Scroll down the panel on the left side to “Background Apps.”
  4. Turn off any apps you do not use.

Applications are often automatically set to run in the background of your device. This enables them to display notifications and update their software automatically. By turning this off on apps you don’t use, you can save RAM storage.

4. Clear Page File When Shutting Down

screenshot of how to free up ram on windows device step 4

When you restart your computer, your page files don’t get cleared or reset because unlike RAM, they get stored on the hard drive. So, when RAM gets stored on-page files it does not get cleared with the rest at shutdown.

Clearing page files on your hard drive will clear any RAM it has stored and help keep your computer running efficiently. You can set this to automatically clear when your computer shuts down, just like the RAM. Do this by opening the Registry Editor:

  1. Type “Registry Editor” into the start menu search bar.
  2. Click “Yes” to allow Registry Editor to make changes to your device.
  3. On the left, scroll to and select “HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE.”
  4. Scroll to select “SYSTEM.”
  5. Select “CurrentControlSet.”
  6. Find and select “Control.”
  7. Scroll to select “Session Manager.”
  8. Look for and choose “Memory Management.”
  9. Select “ClearPageFileAtShutdown.”
  10. Enter the number “1” under the value data and hit OK.

5. Reduce Visual Effects

screenshot of how to free up ram on windows device step 5

With improving technologies, there are many more possibilities for computer effects and visuals. For example, you can turn off the animations for apps and icons that use storage for unnecessary effects. If you seem to be running low on RAM storage, there are some effects you can shelve until you free up more memory.

To access your computer’s visual effects:

  1. Open your File Explorer.
  2. Right-click on “This PC” on the left-side panel to select properties.
  3. Click “Advanced system settings” on the left.
  4. Select the “Advanced” tab.
  5. Choose settings under the “Performance” category.
  6. Change to “Adjust for best performance.”

This setting will disable all animated features on your computer. This will create more storage for you, but limit your computer’s aesthetics significantly. However, you can also customize which visual effects your computer will perform to your preferences in the same tab.

5 Ways to Free up RAM on Mac

For Mac users, there are many convenient tools to monitor and free up RAM storage on your computer.

1. Fix the Finder (Close Finder Windows Too)

screenshot of how to free up ram on mac device step 1

When you open a new window in the finder, the data each window displays gets stored as RAM. Adjusting the finder preferences can make your folders open in tabs rather than new finder windows.

To open your Finder Preferences:

  1. Click “Finder” in the top left of your screen.
  2. Right-click on “Preferences” from the dropdown options.
  3. Check to Open folders in tabs instead of new windows.

There is another way to clear RAM storage by merging your Finder windows. To do this you will select the “Window” dropdown rather than Finder. From there you will select “Merge All Windows” to put all your Finder windows into one place. This will save you on storage as well as declutter your desktop.

2. Check Activity Monitor

screenshot of how to free up ram on mac device step 2

To keep track of your RAM usage on Mac you can check the Activity Monitor, which shows you how much memory is being used and what is using it. Utilize the Activity Monitor to determine which apps take up most of your storage. Remove the ones you no longer use.

To Check the Activity Monitor:

  1. Search “Activity Monitor” in the spotlight search bar (command + space).
  2. Click on the “Memory” tab.
  3. Remove unwanted applications.

3. Check CPU Usage

You can also use the Activity Monitor app to check your CPU health and usage. CPU is your Central Processing Unit, and it carries out instructions from the computer software information stored as RAM.

To monitor your CPU, just select the “CPU” tab in front of the memory tab. This is where you can see if any apps take more processing power than others.

4. Clean-Up Programs and Applications

If you are looking to keep a consistently healthy amount of RAM storage, then you will want to keep your computer clean and organized. A cluttered desktop is going to use storage much faster because macOS views each desktop icon as an active window. Even if you don’t think you can organize your files, putting everything into one general folder can free up a lot of RAM.

5. Free up Disk Space

If you find that your RAM is completely full, but you’re still in need of storage, you can use free space on your Mac’s drive called virtual memory. This extra storage is found on Mac computer’s hard drives so that you can continue running apps. The function is always on, however to use virtual memory you will need to be sure you have driver space available to swap.

Additional Ways to Free up RAM on Windows or Mac

The best thing to do is to be proactive with your computer’s RAM so that you don’t have to worry about freeing up space. Use these additional ways to keep your RAM storage free.

graphic that shows cleaning your RAM

Install a Memory/RAM Cleaner

If you find that you do not have the time, or you just cannot manage to organize your computer, there are memory cleaner apps to help you disinfect your computer. Many of these cleaners have special features for removing apps or extensions and allow users to manage their startup programs.

Increase RAM

You can always add more RAM to your computer if you have a lot of information you don’t want to delete. Buying and installing RAM is easy to do for a desktop computer, but can be troublesome for laptops. Be sure that you invest in the correct type of RAM for your computer as well as the correct amount for your specific storage needs.

Scan for Virus and Malware

When you download any software programs or extensions to your computer there is the chance they could have a virus or malware attached. Once you have malware on your computer, it can steal both your information and your RAM space. To prevent picking up any malware or viruses try using Panda Security antivirus to protect your computer and memory.

Now is the time to stop file hoarding. Many of the files on your computer are taking up RAM space without you realizing it. Now you know how to safely declutter your computer of these unused files and how to free up RAM so your computer runs more efficiently.

Sources: ComputerHope | WindowsCentral | HelloTech | DigitalTrends

Sours: https://www.pandasecurity.com/en/mediacenter/tips/how-to-free-up-ram/
Windows 10 Task Manager 101 RAM Memory usage explained

Task Manager: A Complete Walkthrough

The Processes Tab

The Processes tab in Task Manager is like "home base" in a way—it's the first tab you see by default, gives you some basic information about what's running on your computer right now, and lets you do most of the common things people do in Task Manager.

Right-click or tap-and-hold on any listed process, and you'll be presented with several options, depending on the type of process:

  • Expand/Collapse — just another way to collapse or expand any grouped processes or windows - the same as using the little arrows to the left of the app or process name.
  • Switch to and Bring to front options — available via right-clicking on the window results under the Apps, both bring up the selected window. Minimize and Maximize do what you'd guess, only they don't necessarily bring the window to the foreground.
  • Restart — available for some processes in control of Windows, like Windows Explorer, and will close and automatically restart that process.
  • End task — no matter where you find it, does just that — it closes the task. If you End task from a process that has child windows or processes, they will close as well.
  • Resource values — has nested menus within it of Memory, Disk, and Network. Choose Percents to show resources as a percent of total available on your system. Choose Values (the default) to show the actual level of resource being used. Resource values are also available from the individual column options (more on this in the section below).
  • Create dump file — generates what's called a "dump with heap" — an often very large file, in DMP format, that contains everything going on with that program, usually helpful only to a software developer trying to fix an unknown problem.
  • Go to details — switches you to the Details tab and preselects the executable responsible for that process.
  • Open file location — opens the folder on your computer that contains the executable responsible for that process and preselects it for you.
  • Search online — opens up a search results page in your default browser for the executable file and the common name, hopefully serving up something useful.
  • Properties — opens the Properties of the processes' executable. This is the same Properties window you have access to from the file if you were to go there manually via the right-click menu in any file list in Windows.

By default, the Processes tab shows the Name column, as well as Status, CPU, Memory, Disk, and Network. Right-click or tap-and-hold on any column heading and you'll see additional information you can choose to view for each running process:

  • Name — the program or process's common name, or file description, if it's available. If it's not, the file name of the running process is shown instead. In 64-bit versions of Windows, 32-bit program names are suffixed by (32-bit) when they're running. This column can not be hidden.
  • Type — shows the type of process in each row—a standard App, a Background process, or a Windows process. Task Manager is usually configured to Group by type already, so this column isn't usually helpful to have open.
  • Status — will note if a process is Suspended, but only if Task Manager is configured to Show suspended status from the View > Status values menu.
  • Publisher — shows the running file's author, extracted from the file's copyright data. Nothing is shown if no copyright was included when the file was published.
  • PID — shows each process's process id, a unique identifying number assigned to each running process.
  • Process name — displays the actual file name of the process, including the file extension. This is exactly how the file appears if you were to traditionally navigate to it in Windows.
  • Command line — shows the full path and exact execution of the file that resulted in the running of the process, including any options or variables.
  • CPU — a continuously updated display of how much of your central processing unit's resources each process is using at the given moment. Total percentage of total CPU utilization is shown in the column header and includes all processors and processor cores.
  • Memory — is a continuously updated display of how much of your RAM is being used by each process at the given moment. Total memory usage is shown in the column header.
  • Disk — a continuously updated display of how much read and write activity each process is responsible for, across all of your hard drives, at the given moment. The percentage of total disk utilization is shown in the column header.
  • Network — a continually updated display of the bandwidth being utilized by each process. The percentage utilization of the primary network as a whole is shown in the column header.
  • GPU — a continuously updated display of the GPU utilization across all engines at the given moment. The percentage of total GPU utilization is shown in the column header.
  • GPU engine — which GPU engine each process is using.
  • Power usage — a continually updated display of the CPU, disk, and GPU impact on power consumption. Value can toggle between Very low, Low, Moderate, High, and Very high.
  • Power usage trend — CPU, disk, and GPU impact on power consumption over time.

The button at the bottom-right of this tab changes depending on what you have selected. On most processes, it becomes End task but a few have a Restart ability.

The Performance Tab (CPU)

The Performance tab in Task Manager gives you an overview of how your hardware is being utilized by Windows and whatever software you're running right now.

This tab is further broken down by the individual hardware categories that are most important to your system's performance — CPU, Memory, Disk, and GPU, plus either Wireless or Ethernet (or both). Additional hardware categories might also be included here too, like Bluetooth.

Let's look at CPU first and then Memory, Disk, and Ethernet over the next several parts of this walkthrough:

Above the graph, you'll see the make and model of your CPU(s), along with the maximum speed, also reported below.

The CPU % Utilization Graph operates as you'd probably expect, with time on the x-axis and total CPU utilization, from 0% to 100%, on the y-axis.

The data at the far right is right now and moving left you're seeing an increasingly older look at how much of your CPU's total capacity was being utilized by your computer. Remember, you can always change the rate at which this data is updated via View > Update Speed.

Right-click or tap-and-hold anywhere on the right to bring up some options for this graph:

  • Change graph to — gives you the options of Overall utilization (one graph representing the total utilization across all physical and logical CPUs), Logical Processors (individual graphs, each representing a single CPU core), and NUMA nodes (each NUMA node in an individual graph).
  • Show kernel times — adds a second layer to the CPU graph that isolates CPU utilization due to kernel processes—those executed by Windows itself. This data appears as a dotted-line so you don't confuse it with the overall CPU utilization, which includes both user and kernel processes (i.e., everything).
  • Graph summary view — hides all the data in Task Manager, including the menus and other tabs, leaving only the graph itself. This is particularly helpful when you need to keep an eye on CPU utilization without the distractions of all that other data.
  • View — gives you a right-click method of jumping to the other Memory, Disk, Network, and GPU areas of the Performance tab.
  • Copy — will copy all of the non-graph information on the page (more on all of that below) to the Windows clipboard, making it really easy to paste anywhere you like... like that chat window where you're getting help from tech support.

There's lots of other information on this screen, all located below the graph. The first set of numbers, which are displayed in a larger font and that you'll no doubt see change from moment to moment, include:

  • Utilization — shows the current Overall utilization of the CPU, which should match where the data line meets the graph's y-axis, on the far right.
  • Speed — shows the speed at which the CPU is operating at right now.
  • Processes — a total count of all processes running at the moment.
  • Threads — the total number of threads running in the processes at this time, including one idle thread per processor installed.
  • Handles — the total number of object handles in the tables of all running processes.
  • Up time — the total time the system has been running in DD:HH:MM:SS (e.g., 2:16:47:28 means 2 days, 16 hours, 47 minutes, and 28 seconds). This count resets to zero when the computer is restarted or powered on.

The remaining data you see is static data about your CPU(s):

  • Base speed — the listed maximum speed for your CPU. You may see the actual speed go a bit higher and lower than this as you use your computer.
  • Sockets — indicates the number of physically distinct CPUs you have installed.
  • Cores — reports the total number of independent processing units available across all installed processors.
  • Logical processors — the total number of non-physical processing units available across all installed processors.
  • Virtualization — reports the current status, either Enabled or Disabled, of hardware-based virtualization.
  • Hyper-V support — indicates whether or not Microsoft Hyper-V virtualization is supported by the installed CPU(s).
  • L1 cache — reports the total amount of L1 cache is available in the CPU, a small but super-fast pool of memory the CPU can use exclusively for its own purposes.
  • L2 cache, L3 cache, and L4 cache — are increasingly larger, and slower, stores of memory that the CPU can use when the L1 cache is full.

Finally, at the very bottom of every Performance tab you'll see a shortcut to Resource Monitor, a more robust hardware monitoring tool included with Windows.

The Performance Tab (Memory)

The next hardware category in the Performance tab in Task Manager is Memory, tracking and reporting on various aspects of your installed RAM.

Above the topmost graph, you'll see the total amount of memory, likely in GB, installed and recognized by Windows.

Memory has two different graphs:

The Memory Usage Graph, similar to the CPU graph, operates with time on the x-axis and total RAM utilization, from 0 GB to your maximum usable memory in GB, on the y-axis.

The data at the far right is right now, and moving left you're seeing an increasingly older look at how much of your RAM's total capacity was being utilized by your computer.

The Memory Composition Graph is not time-based, but instead a multi-section graph, some parts of which you may not always see:

  • In use — memory in use by "processes, drivers, or the operating system."
  • Modified — memory "whose contents must be written to disk before it can be used for another purpose."
  • Standby — memory in memory that contains "cached data and code that is not actively in use."
  • Free — memory that "is not currently in use, and that will be repurposed first when processes, drivers, or the operating system need more memory."

Right-click or tap-and-hold anywhere on the right to bring up some options:

  • Graph summary view — hides all the data in Task Manager, including the menus and other tabs, leaving only the two graphs themselves. This is particularly helpful when you need to keep an eye on memory usage without all that extra data in the way.
  • View — gives you a right-click method of jumping to the other CPU, Disk, Network, and GPU areas of the Performance tab.
  • Copy — will copy all of the non-graph memory use and other information on the page (more on all of that below) to the clipboard.

Below the graphs are two sets of information. The first, which you'll notice is in a larger font, is live memory data which you'll probably change every so often:

  • In use — the total amount of RAM in use at this moment, which matches where the data line crosses the graph's y-axis, on the far right of the memory usage graph.
  • Available — the memory that's available to be used by the operating system. Adding the Standby and Free amounts listed in the Memory Composition Graph will get you this number as well.
  • Committed — has two parts, the first being the Commit Charge, a lower number than the second, the Commit Limit. These two amounts are related to virtual memory and the paging file; specifically, once the Commit Charge reaches the Commit Limit, Windows will attempt to increase the size of the pagefile.
  • Cached — the memory being passively used by the operating system. Combining the Standby and Modified amounts listed in the Memory Composition Graph will get you this number.
  • Paged pool — reports the amount of memory used by important operating system processes (kernel mode components) that can be moved to the pagefile if physical RAM starts to run out.
  • Non-paged pool — reports the amount of memory used by kernel-mode components that must be kept in physical memory and can't be moved to the virtual memory pagefile.

The remaining data, in smaller font and on the right, contains static data about your installed RAM:

  • Speed — the speed of the installed RAM, usually in MHz.
  • Slots used — reports the physical RAM module slots on the motherboard that are used and the total available. For example, if this is 2 of 4, it means that your computer supports 4 physical RAM slots but only 2 are currently being used.
  • Form factor — reports the form factor of the installed memory, almost always DIMM.
  • Hardware reserved — the amount of physical RAM reserved by hardware devices. For example, if your computer has integrated video hardware, without dedicated memory, several GB of RAM may be reserved for graphics processes.

The slots used, form factor, and speed data are particularly helpful when you're looking to upgrade or replace your RAM, especially when you can't find information about your computer online or a system information tool isn't more helpful.

The Performance Tab (Disk)

The next hardware device to be tracked in the Performance tab in Task Manager is Disk, reporting on various aspects of your hard drive and other attached storage devices like external drives.

Above the topmost graph, you'll see the make model number of the device, if available. If you're looking for a specific hard drive, you can check the other Disk x entries on the left.

Disk has two different graphs:

The Active Time Graph, similar to the CPU and main Memory graphs, this one operates with time on the x-axis. The y-axis shows, from 0 to 100%, the percentage of time that the disk was busy doing something.

The data at the far right is right now, and moving left you're seeing an increasingly older look at the percentage of time this drive was active.

The Disk Transfer Rate Graph, also time-based on the x-axis, shows the disk write speed (dotted line) and disk read speed (solid line). The numbers on the top-right of the graph are showing peak rates over the time frame on the x-axis.

Right-click or tap-and-hold anywhere on the right to show some familiar options:

  • Graph summary view — hides all the data in Task Manager, including the menus and other tabs, leaving only the two graphs themselves.
  • View — gives you a right-click method of jumping to the other CPU, Memory, Network, and GPU areas of the Performance tab.
  • Copy — will copy to the clipboard all of the non-graph disk use and other information on the page.

Below the graphs are two different sets of information. The first, shown in a larger font, is live disk usage data which you'll certainly see change if you watch:

  • Active time — shows the percentage of time, within the units of time on the x-axis, that the disk is busy reading or writing data.
  • Average response time — reports the average total time it takes for the disk to complete an individual read/write activity.
  • Read speed — the rate at which the drive is reading data from the disk, at this moment, reported in either MB/s or KB/s.
  • Write speed — the rate at which the drive is writing data to the disk, at this moment, reported in either MB/s or KB/s.

The rest of the data about the disk is static and reported in TB, GB, or MB:

  • Capacity — the total size of the physical disk.
  • Formatted — the total of all formatted areas on the disk.
  • System disk — indicates whether or not this disk contains the system partition.
  • Page file — indicates whether or not this disk contains a pagefile.
  • Type — indicates the disk type, such as HDD or Removable.

Much more information about your physical disks, the drives they make up, their file systems, and lots more, can be found in Disk Management.

The Performance Tab (Ethernet)

The final major hardware device to be tracked in the Performance tab in Task Manager is Ethernet, reporting on various aspects of your network, and ultimately internet, connection.

Above the graph, you'll see the make and model of the network adapter you're viewing the performance of. If this adapter is virtual, like a VPN connection, you'll see the name provided for that connection, which may or may not look familiar to you.

The Throughput Graph has time on the x-axis, like most graphs in Task Manager, and the total network utilization, in Gbps, Mbps, or Kbps, on the y-axis.

The data at the far right is right now, and moving left you're seeing an increasingly older look at how much network activity was taking place via this particular connection.

Right-click or tap-and-hold anywhere on the right to bring up some options for this graph:

  • Graph summary view — hides all the data in Task Manager, including the menus and other tabs, leaving only the graph, a fantastic choice if you want to dock this window in the corner of your desktop to keep an eye on things.
  • View — gives you a right-click method of jumping to the other CPU, Memory, Disk, and GPU areas of the Performance tab.
  • View network details — will bring up the Network Details window, a data-only, fine-grained, down-to-the-byte view the different types of information passing in and out of each adapter on your system.
  • Copy — will copy to the clipboard all of the non-graph network utilization data and other information on the page.

Below the graph is live send/receive data:

  • Send — shows the current rate by which data is being sent via this adapter, in Gbps, Mbps, or Kbps, and reported on the graph as a dotted line.
  • Receive — shows the current rate by which data is being received via this adapter, in Gbps, Mbps, or Kbps, and reported on the graph as a solid line.

...and next to that, some helpful static information on this adapter:

  • Adapter name — the name, in Windows, given to this adapter.
  • SSID — the wireless network name that you're connected via this adapter.
  • DNS name — the DNS server that you're currently connected to. This is not the same thing as the DNS servers that your connection to the internet is using!
  • Connection type — shows the general type of connection this is, like Ethernet, 802.11ac, Bluetooth PAN, etc.
  • IPv4 address — lists the current IPv4 IP address tied to this adapter's current connection.
  • IPv6 address — lists the current IPv6 address tied to this adapter's current connection.
  • Signal strength — shows the current wireless signal strength.

The data you see in this "static" area varies greatly depending on the type of connection. For example, you'll only see signal strength and SSID on non-Bluetooth wireless connections. The DNS name field is even more rare, usually only showing up on VPN connections.

The App History Tab

The App History tab in Task Manager shows CPU and network hardware resource usage on a per-app basis. To also see data for non-Windows Store apps and programs, choose Show history for all processes from the Options menu.

The date app-specific resource tracking started is shown at the top of the tab, after Resource usage since .... Tap or click Delete usage history to remove all the data recorded in this tab and immediately start the counts over at zero.

By default, the App History tab shows the Name column, as well as CPU time, Network, Metered network, and Tile updates. Right-click or tap-and-hold on any column heading and you'll see additional information you can choose to view for each app or process:

  • Name — the program or process's common name, or file description, if it's available. If it's not, the file name of the running process is shown instead. This column can not be removed.
  • CPU time — the amount of time spent by the CPU executing instructions initiated by this app or process.
  • Network — the total network activity (downloads + uploads), in MB, this process or app is responsible for.
  • Metered network — reports, in MB, the total network activity by this app that occurred over a metered network connection.
  • Tile updates — the total download and upload activity, in MB, used by this app's tile updates and notifications.
  • Non-metered network — reports, in MB, the total network activity by this app that occurred over a non-metered network connection
  • Downloads — reports the total download activity, in MB, this process or app is responsible for.
  • Uploads — reports the total upload activity, in MB, this process or app is responsible for.

Right-click or tap-and-hold on any row with a non-app process and you'll get two options:

  • Search online — opens a search results page in your default browser, using the executable file and the common name as the search terms.
  • Properties — opens the Properties of the processes' executable. This is the same Properties window you'd see if you were to choose this option after right-clicking on the file anywhere else in Windows.

Right-click or tap-and-hold on any app to Switch to that app. The switch to wording on the apps is a little disingenuous here because the app, even if running, won't be switched to at all. Instead, a completely new instance of the app is started.

The Startup Tab

The Startup tab in Task Manager shows you all the processes that are configured to start automatically when Windows starts. Previously disabled startup processes are listed, too.

In versions of Windows that have it, this Task Manager tab replaces, and expands upon, the data in the Startup tab found in the System Configuration (msconfig) tool.

Above the table is a Last BIOS time indication which is a measurement, in seconds, of the last system startup time. Technically, this is the time between BIOS handing booting off to Windows and when Windows has fully started (not including you signing on). Some computers may not see this.

Right-click or tap-and-hold on any listed process and you'll be presented with several options, depending on the type of process:

  • Expand/Collapse — just another way to expand or collapse grouped processes. This is no different than using the little arrows to the left of the process name.
  • Disable/Enable — will disable a currently enabled, or enable a previously disabled, process from starting automatically with Windows.
  • Open file location — opens the folder on your computer that contains the executable responsible for that process and selects it for you.
  • Search online — opens up a search results page in your default browser, using the file and common names as search terms. This is a great way to investigate a startup item you're not sure what to do with.
  • Properties — opens the Properties of the processes' executable. This is the same Properties option available from the file's right-click menu in other parts of Windows.

By default, the Startup tab shows the Name column, as well as Publisher, Status, and Startup impact. Right-click or tap-and-hold on any column heading and you'll see additional information you can choose to view for each startup process:

  • Name — the program or process's common name, or file description, if it's available. If it's not, the file name of the running process is shown instead. You can't remove this column from the table.
  • Publisher — shows the running file's author, extracted from the file's copyright data. If the file doesn't contain copyright data then this field is left blank.
  • Status — will note if a process is Enabled or Disabled as a startup item.
  • Startup impact — the impact on CPU and disk activity that this process had the last time the computer started. Possible values include High, Medium, Low, or None, and is updated after each startup. You'll see Not measured if Windows wasn't able to determine the resource impact for some reason.
  • Startup type — indicates the source of the instruction to start this process at startup. Registry is referring to the Windows Registry (at SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\Run in HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE or HKEY_CURRENT_USER) and Folder to the Startup folder in the Start Menu.
  • Disk I/O at startup — the total read/write activity, measured in MB, that this process engaged in during the Windows startup process.
  • CPU at startup — the total CPU time, measured in milliseconds, that this process used during the Windows startup process.
  • Running now — indicates if the listed process is currently running.
  • Disabled time — lists the day of the week, month, day, year, and local time that a disabled startup process was disabled.
  • Command line — shows the full path and exact execution, including any options or variables, of this startup process.

In lieu of right-clicking or tap-and-holding a process to disable or enable it from starting up, you can choose to tap or click the Disable or Enable button, respectively, to do the same.

The Users Tab

The Users tab in Task Manager is a lot like the Processes tab but processes are instead grouped by signed in user. At a minimum, it's a convenient way to see which users are currently signed in to the computer and what hardware resources they're using.

To see real names in addition to account usernames, choose Show full account name from the Options menu.

Right-click or tap-and-hold on any user and you'll be presented with several options:

  • Expand/Collapse — just another way to collapse or expand the grouped processes running under that user. It works the same as the arrows to the left of the user.
  • Disconnect — will disconnect the user from the system but will not sign that user off. Disconnecting usually only has value if the user you disconnect is using the computer remotely, at the same time you are.
  • Manage user accounts — just a shortcut to User Accounts applet in Control Panel.

Right-click or tap-and-hold on any listed process under a user (expand the user if you don't see these) and you'll be presented with several options:

  • Switch to — if available, brings this running program to the foreground.
  • Restart — available for some Windows processes, like Windows Explorer, and will close and automatically restart the process.
  • End task — unsurprisingly, ends the task.
  • Resource values — the top level menu of a series of nested menus: Memory, Disk, and Network. Choose Percents to show resources as a percent of total resources. Choose Values (the default) to show the actual resource level being utilized.
  • Create dump file — generates a "dump with heap" in DMP format. This often very large file contains everything involved with that process.
  • Go to details — switches you to the Details tab and selects the executable responsible for that process.
  • Open file location — opens the folder on your computer that contains the executable responsible for the particular process.
  • Search online — automatically searches online for information about the process. The page that opens is in your default browser but always uses Microsoft's Bing search engine.
  • Properties — opens the Properties data available for this processes' executable.

By default, the Users tab shows the User column, as well as Status, CPU, Memory, Disk, Network, and GPU. Right-click or tap-and-hold on any column heading and you'll see additional information you can choose to view for each user and running process:

  • User — shows the user's account name along with an updated number, in parenthesis, indicating the number of processes running under that user at this moment. The expanded view of the User shows those running processes.
  • ID — shows the number assigned to the session that the user became a part of when signing in. Certain types of software, as well as Windows itself, may be a part of a session so a sole user of a computer may not be assigned Session 0.
  • Session — describes the type of session this user is using on the computer. When using your computer normally you'll see Console. If you're connecting remotely, like via Remote Desktop, you'll see RDP-Tcp#0 or something similar.
  • Client name — displays the hostname of the client computer that the user is using to connect to this computer. You'll only see this when there's an active remote connection, like a Remote Desktop connection to your PC.
  • Status — will note if a process is Suspended, but only if Task Manager is configured to report this, via View > Status values > Show suspended status.
  • CPU — a continuously updated display of how much of your CPU's resources each process, as well as each user as a whole, is using at the given moment. Total percentage of total CPU utilization is shown in the column header and includes all processors and processor cores.
  • Memory — a continuously updated display of how much of your RAM is being used by each process and each user at the given moment. Total memory usage is shown in the column header.
  • Disk — a continuously updated display of how much read and write activity each process, and user, is responsible for, across all of your hard drives, at the given moment. The percentage of total disk utilization is shown in the column header.
  • Network — a continually updated display of the bandwidth being utilized by each process and each user. The percentage utilization of the primary network as a whole is shown in the column header.
  • GPU — a continuously updated display of the GPU utilization across all engines at the given moment. The percentage of total GPU utilization is shown in the column header.
  • GPU engine — which GPU engine each process is using.

The button at the bottom-right of this tab changes depending on what you have selected. On a user, it becomes Disconnect and on a process it becomes End task or Restart, depending on the process selected.

The Details Tab

The Details tab in Task Manager contains what can only be interpreted as the mother lode of data on each process running on your computer right now. This tab is what the Processes tab was in Windows 7 and earlier, with a few extras.

Right-click or tap-and-hold on any listed process and you'll be presented with several options:

  • End task — ends the process. Assuming the ending was successful, the process will disappear from the list in the tab.
  • End process tree — ends the process, as well as any child processes that the process was responsible for starting.
  • Set priority — allows you to set the base priority of a process which, depending on what threads are seeking the same priority at the same time, may improve the process' ability to utilize the CPU by giving it access to it before other processes. Options are Realtime, High, Above normal, Normal, Below Normal, and Low.
  • Set affinity — allows you to choose which CPU cores the process is allowed to utilize. Options include <All Processors> or any combination of CPU cores available on your computer. At least one core must be chosen.
  • Analyze wait chain — shows, in a new Analyze wait chain window, what other processes the process in question is using... or waiting to use. If one of those processes this one is waiting on is frozen/hung, it will be highlighted in red. You can then end that process, via the End process button, and potentially prevent any data loss that may have occurred by ending the original process.
  • UAC virtualization — toggles UAC virtualization on or off for the process, assuming it's allowed for it.
  • Create dump file — generates a "dump with heap"—a file, DMP format, that contains everything going on with that process.
  • Open file location — opens the folder on your computer that contains the executable responsible for that process.
  • Search online — opens up a search results page in your default browser, using the executable file and the common name as search terms.
  • Properties — opens the Properties of the processes' executable. This is the same Properties window you'd see if you opened Properties from the file directly.
  • Go to service(s) — switches you to the Services tab and preselects the service(s) associated with the process. If no service is associated then no preselection takes place but you'll still be switched to that tab.

By default, the Details tab shows the Name column, as well as PID, Status, User name, CPU, Memory (private working set), and Description. Right-click or tap-and-hold on any column heading and choose Select columns. From this list are a number of additional columns of information you can choose to view for each running process:

  • Name — the actual file name of the running process, including the file extension. This is exactly how the file appears if you were to navigate to it in Windows.
  • Package name — another descriptive field available for apps. These processes are typically located in the \Windows\SystemApps or \Program Files\WindowsApps folders.
  • PID — shows the process's process id, a unique identifying number assigned to each running process.
  • Status — will note if a process is currently Running or Suspended.
  • User name — shows the account name of the user that started the process, even if it was automatic. Aside from signed in users (like you), you'll also see LOCAL SERVICE, NETWORK SERVICE, SYSTEM, and possibly a few others.
  • Session ID — shows the number assigned to the session that the process was started in. Windows itself may be a part of a session, probably 0, and then other users, like you, will be part of different sessions, likely 1 or 2.
  • Job Object ID — shows the "job object in which the process is running."
  • CPU — live display of how much of your central processing unit's resources the process is currently using and includes all processors and cores.
  • CPU time — the total processor time, in HH:MM:SS format, that the process has utilized since it started.
  • Cycle — reports the current percent of CPU cycle time consumption by the process, which includes all processors and cores. Usually, the System Idle Process will be utilizing most of the cycle time.
  • Working set (memory) — a live display of how much of your computer's physical memory is in use by the process at this time. This is a combination of the memory reported in the private and shared working set.
  • Peak working set (memory) — the maximum amount of physical memory this process used at one time since the process started. Think of this as the "record high memory use" for this process.
  • Working set delta (memory) — the change in the process' physical memory usage between each test. In other words, it shows the change in the Working set (memory) value each time that value is tested.
  • Memory (private working set) — the physical memory in use by the process that no other process is able to use.
  • Memory (shared working set) — the physical memory in use by the process that is available for sharing with other processes.
  • Commit size — the "amount of virtual memory reserved by the operating system for the process."
  • Paged pool — the "amount of pageable kernel memory allocated by the kernel or drivers on behalf of the process."
  • NP pool — the "amount of non-pageable kernel memory allocated by the kernel or drivers on behalf of the process."
  • Page faults — the "number of page faults generated by the process since it was started." A page fault occurs when the process accesses memory that's not part of its working set. Here's how to fix a page fault error.
  • PF Delta — the "change in the number of page faults since the last update."
  • Base priority — the "ranking that determines the order in which threads of a process are scheduled." Possible values include Realtime, High, Above normal, Normal, Below Normal, Low, and N/A. Base priority for a process can be set via Set priority, available when right-clicking or tap-and-holding on the process.
  • Handles — reports the "current number of handles open by the process."
  • Threads — reports the number of active threads the process is running right now.
  • User objects — the "number of window manager objects (windows, menus, cursors, keyboard layouts, monitors, etc.) used by the process."
  • GDI objects — the "number of GDI (Graphics Device Interface) objects used by the process."
  • I/O reads — the count of " read I/O operations generated by the process since it was started." This includes file, device, and network I/Os.
  • I/O writes — the count of "write I/O operations generated by the process since it was started." This includes file, device, and network I/Os.
  • I/O other — the count of "non-read/non-write I/O operations generated by the process since it was started." Control functions are a common other example.
  • I/O read bytes — reports the actual amount of I/O reads, in bytes, that this process is responsible for generating since it started.
  • I/O write bytes — reports the actual amount of I/O writes, in bytes, that this process is responsible for generating since it started..
  • I/O other bytes — reports the actual amount of I/O operations (other than reads and writes), in bytes, that this process is responsible for generating since it started.
  • Image path name — reports the full location, including the drive, folders, and file name with extension, where this process can be found on the hard drive.
  • Command line — shows the full image path name, plus any options or variables used to execute the process.
  • Operating system context — reports the "operating system context in which the process is running." If you see an older version of Windows in this field it does not indicate that you're running an outdated process. It's simply reporting the level of compatibility and only if provided by the manifest in the process executable.
  • Platform — reports if the process is running as 64-bit or 32-bit. This notation can also be seen, in parenthesis, after the process' name back on Processes tab.
  • Elevated — indicates whether or not the process is running "elevated" (i.e. as an administrator) or not. This is the same "elevated" as in running a command via an elevated Command Prompt.
  • UAC virtualization — "specifies whether User Account Control (UAC) virtualization is enabled, disabled, or not allowed in the process."
  • Description — the process's common name, or file description, if available. If it's not, the file name of the running process is shown instead.
  • Data Execution Prevention — "specifies whether Data Execution Prevention (DEP) is enabled or disabled for the process."

With all selected processes, the button on the bottom-right will End task — the same as the End task right-click/tap-and-hold option.

The Services Tab

The Services tab in Task Manager is a stripped-down version of Services, the tool in Windows that's used to manage Windows services. The full Services tool can be found in Administrative Tools, via Control Panel.

Right-click or tap-and-hold on any listed service and you'll be presented with a few options:

  • Start — will start a currently stopped service.
  • Stop — will stop a currently running service.
  • Restart — will restart a currently running service (i.e., stop it and then automatically start it again).
  • Open Services — no matter which service you choose this option from, opens the Services tool. It does not preselect the service in Services.
  • Search online — opens up a search results page in your default browser, using the service name and description as the search terms.
  • Go to details —switches you to the Details tab and auto-selects the executable responsible for that service. This option is only available if the service is running.

Unlike with other tabs in Task Manager, the columns in the Services tab are preset and can not be changed:

  • Name — the name of the service and comes from the Service name field in the Services tool.
  • PID — shows the unique process id for the service's associated process.
  • Description — the listed description for the service and comes from the Display name field in the Services tool.
  • Status — will note if a process is currently Running or Stopped.
  • Group — displays the group the service is a part of, if it is part of one.

While they can't be changed, the columns in the Services tab can be rearranged. Just click or hold and drag around as you like.

Thanks for letting us know!

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