Hockey painting ideas

Hockey painting ideas DEFAULT
Goalie Mask Painting
Since my days as an adolescent, the goalie position has always fascinated me.  Sure making the huge save at a crucial moment in the game is a big deal, but that wasn’t what gravitated me towards the the aura that surrounded the netminder.  I found the design on the helmet to conjure up feelings of awesomeness.  I remember thinking: WOW! That mask has the coolest design on it!  I wanna play goalie just for the mask!

It only took one time suiting up in pads to realize playing goalie wasn’t as fun as I had envisioned it.

I didn’t appreciate the stories, journeys, memories, etc. that came with each design until much later, but I distinctly remember Hextall’s orange arrow mask, Hayward’s Shark teeth bucket, and Belfour’s patented Eagles wings.  This fascination has carried on up until now and oftentimes I find myself admiring Jonas Hiller’s all black helmet and Henrik Lundqvist’s sparkling Statue of Liberty mask.

Goalie Mask Painting – Each Work is Unique

Each pattern isn’t a pre-designed template that is simply placed on each mask.  For every goalie there is a goalie mask, and for every goalie mask there is an artist – one who has spent countless hours refining his tools to make the most appealing work of art displayed for hundreds of thousands of hockey fans to view and ponder.  In steps Andrew Manning [stage right].

Andrew has only been painting goalie masks since , so he is fairly new in terms of experience, but you would never know by viewing his finished products.  He always had a knack for drawing and coming up with designs, but never realized he could parlay this talents for goalie masks.

Goalie mask
“It was a really odd turn of events, actually,” Manning said.  “I had started Air Trix Studios 8 months prior to doing masks – I was doing custom motorcycle artwork. I bumped into a former hockey teammate and had some small talk. He mentioned that he was coaching for the local Jr. D club and that I should talk to his starting goaltender about making a design up for his mask.  I painted the mask for him in January of , put it up on social media – Facebook and Twitter – and its taken off from their!”

Each goalie mask is different.  Copious amounts of ideas are bounced back and forth between goalie and designer, but the basic layout of the airbrush process is relatively the same.

“When a team or goalie contacts me about a mask we go over the ideas they would like to incorporate.  They send reference materials to me and from there I draw up concepts for them.  After the concepts are sent off we have a phone call meeting to discuss any alterations that need to be made.  Then I create a final rendering in Photoshop and we base the mask off that.  When the mask comes into Air Trix Studios we strip the mask down to the bare shell, make any repairs that are needed and they get primed and prepared for the paint process.  After the mask is prepared for paint, it goes into the heart of the studio – my painting table.  Here the artwork is applied and any free hand portraits are done using our great airbrushes from Iwata.”  Manning continued, “Once all the art work is done, it goes into the booth and is clear coated using our great system and water sanded and polished to a great finish!  After the mask has dried, we inspect the mask and then it goes to final assembly and photography.  It’s a very fun journey for goalies and myself.  Normally this whole process takes all of days.”

Mask Painting Requires the Best Products

The materials and paint used is one of a kind.  One would guess you’d need some of the top products to make a mask stand out and be admired.  Andrew realized this when he first began and he hasn’t changed the philosophy since.

“Air Trix Studios uses the highest quality products available.  We use high performance Hydro-carbon color systems which offers high flexibility under cold conditions (main cause of mask chipping) and the clear coat system is the same product that can be found on cars built by Ferrari.  It really is some amazing stuff!”

One of the most difficult parts of the job is figuring out where the designs and layouts will be placed on the mask.  It is an tediously arduous process and must be done with as few flaws as possible…preferably none.  It takes a skilled worker such as Manning to get everything just perfect.

“To lay out the design I always take into consideration the shape of the mask.  Its high spots, low spots and areas that are covered by strapping and the cage.  Another big thing is balancing around vent holes.  Nothing worse than having a great portrait of someone’s face, then having it placed over a hole.  [Laughing] If not, they become a cyclops.  The major thing though is color separation.  Whatever colors are used in the theme, it’s important to give a splash of it in the proper areas to make the mask look cohesive.  It can really make or break a job,” said Andrew.  “All of these elements really come into play when doing the designs for the players.  When the attention is paid to all these areas you can really create something special!”

The best part about the job is mixing the thoughts and ideas of the goalie he is working for with his own interpretations.  It makes for a unique concept that has a very defining impression and meaning to, both, creator and player.

“I think [the design] is a great mix of both!  Some players are very artistic and send me technical drawings of there vision, while others give me a theme and say ‘go for it!’  Regardless of initial input, I like to have design meetings with the goalies over the phone to bounce ideas back and forth.  I have found even if a goalie initially says ‘go for it’ during our design meetings they think of cool little things we can add and build off of.  I like doing it that way.  Means more to me as an artist to create for them and it means a lot to the goalie because they can turn a small idea they had into a remarkable mask,” Manning explained.

And just for kicks, some of the requests by goalies can be rather “risque”, if you will.  But that only leads to a more original idea and a better story to tell for later.

“Nothing is “crazy” if you put it in the right context.  I have had a few request for images that were…shall we say not safe for work [laughing].  I like it when a goalie gives me a ‘far out’ idea.  It pushes me to create and think outside the box – much like a helmet I painted for a goalie in Switzerland.  He asked me what I thought about painting the ‘Vitruvian man’ by Leonardo Da Vinci.  I had never seen it before on a mask in my life and loved the idea right from the start.  I think the mask turned out really nice.  Very clean, but great attention to details, at the same time.”

Each mask is special in it’s own way, but Andrew is currently working on a mask that touches base with him, more so than any other he’s worked on.

“I’m working on a very special design for this fall. Its a tribute mask to the troops and really hits home,” he mentions.  “My grandfather was in the military and served for his country in World War 2 and various other campaigns over his life.  I’m very proud of him and will be giving the most amount of detail/attention into it that I possibly can.”

His work has amassed interest from all around the world from minor leagues in Canada, to the Swedish Elite League.

“In just under a year and a half of creating professional mask art I have been fortunate to have worked with some amazing athletes!  From OHL, stars Petr Mrazek, Brandon Maxwell and Brandon Hope.  To HV71 (Swedish Elite League) rookie Sander Berg, Dennis Saikonnen of the GCK Lions (Switzerland), and a host of other great goalies stretching from Los Angeles all the way to Norway.”  Manning went on, “We have some new goalies and projects that we have welcomed to the Air Trix family for this upcoming season in the NHL and OHL, but can’t say to much right now.  Very exciting times at the studio!”

Manning was able to catch the eye of one of the most prominent goalies in the NHL today, Carey Price of the Montreal Canadiens.

“I was asked in the spring to create this mask for the Price family.  It was a tribute to his father (who was drafted by the Flyers) and his journey with Carey growing up and teaching him to play hockey.  The one side was the Philadelphia theme with the Liberty Bell ghosted into the logo and atop is the bold iconic bridge.  The other side was “The Journey” (name of the mask) on top of the mask is a soft oil painting style of Anahim Lake BC where Carey was raised.  I chose that style for the calm, serene feel of the land as well as most of the art that was produced in that region was either oil painting or water colors.  Ghosted in the logo you will find the same Piper Cherokee plane that Jerry bought to fly Carey to the rink in Williams Lake.  With a little added touch though, I replaced the aviation numbers on the side of the plane with the numbers , which is Carey’s birthday.  I spoke with his sister, Kayla, after he gave the mask to his dad on fathers day and it apparently made his mother cry with joy.  I was very happy to work on that project for them.”

There are many rewards associated with painting masks for netminders such as some extra cash, a bit of fame, what have you.  Be that as it may, none of those seem to affect the humble personality Manning calls his own.  He’s built his craft on emotion, hardheadedness, determination, and talent.  Each mask carves a new piece into his life, so when I asked what the best part of his job was, he replied, “I love talking with the goalies and getting a feel for what they like in a mask.  I really enjoy learning about different things when researching for a mask.  The paint process is always fun.  But the best thing is seeing the reaction from the people when they get the mask back.  I’ve done some tribute masks with portraits of people that have passed and actually had family members burst into tears because it looks exactly like them and it’s done in a respectful manner.  That’s the best thing to me, a design that can bring emotions out in people.”

However, he is never one to shy away from giving advice to aspiring goalie mask artists who are trying their damndest to make it into the industry.

“When giving advice, I can’t speak for everyone, but these are a few tips I believe in.  Quality of work – paint, paint, paint.  You will never get stronger as an artist if you don’t hone your craft.  Another is think outside the box.  This goes for art and the business structure.  Thirdly, be humble.  Much like the goalies we work with we are blessed to be able to do something that others might not.  Furthermore, talk to people.  No one knows the guy in the corner of the room, introduce yourself to prospective goalies, teams, etc.  And lastly, be a good person, plain and simple.  You could be the best in the world, but if you have a bad attitude no one will want to work with you.”

Air Trix Studios is going strong and goalies continue to bombard Andrew with requests day after day.  It isn’t the easiest of tasks, as I hopefully explained early on in the article, but it certainly has its benefits and rewards.  You can meet some great people in the business, share emotions with players and family members through the simple stroke of an air brush, and your masterpieces that you’ve created can be flaunted for a massive population to view and appreciate.

I know I can’t be the only kid who found goalie masks appealing, and it is thanks to the work of artists like Andrew Manning of Air Trix Studios who make an idea become a reality.  For that, we are forever indebted to the beauty, technique, and sheer brilliance of goalie mask artists.

Visit the Air Trix Studios site at www.airtrix.ca, like Air Trix Studios on Facebook, and follow Air Trix Studios on Twitter (@Air_Trix).

Follow Shawn Reznik on Twitter (@ShawnReznikTHW).

THW Archives

The archives of THW contain over 40, posts on all things hockey. We aim to share with you some of the gems we’ve published over the years.

Categories News, NHL GoaltendingTags Air Trix Studios, Carey Price, Goalie Masks, Ottawa 67s, Petr MrazekSours: https://thehockeywriters.com/goalie-mask-painting-an-in-depth-look/

Boys Bedroom Ideas #1: Hockey Bedroom

Did you have to move houses when you were a kid?  What did your parents do to make the transition easier on you?

Nolin’s mom, Donna, decided to redecorate his room into a hockey bedroom when they first moved to Stoney Creek (from Oakville) to make him feel more at home.

After chatting with Donna, we set up an in person consultation and I brought a bunch of hockey bedroom ideas with me.

I put them together in this post for you so that you can get some inspiration if you’d like to make your own hockey bedroom.

Removable Wallpaper for a Hockey Bedroom

I sell wallpaper murals that ship for FREE all over the USA and Canada, and I have a few really cool hockey designs.  They’re super easy to hang and totally removable.

**Super sneaky tip (if you like these designs): keep your eyes peeled on my newsletter for when they come on sale&#;or for an extra hot coupon code!

I shared these designs with Donna:

Breakaway Wall Mural, as seen in this bedroom, is a hockey wallpaper featuring a player taking a shot at the goalie. Hockey wall murals sold by AboutMurals.ca.

Breakaway Wallpaper Mural &#; Click for Sizes and Prices

Locker Room Wall Mural, as seen in this playroom, is a painting of blue and red hockey jerseys hanging in cubby holes. Kids wallpaper sold by AboutMurals.ca.

Locker Room Wallpaper Mural &#; Click for Sizes and Prices

The Good Old Days Wall Mural, as seen in this playroom, features kids playing ice hockey on a frozen pond in winter. Hockey wallpaper sold by AboutMurals.ca.

The Good Old Days Wallpaper Mural &#; Click for Sizes and Prices

Sports Unlimited Wall Mural, as seen in this gym, is a painting of athletes playing football, basketball, hockey, baseball, tennis and soccer. Sports wall murals sold by AboutMurals.ca.

Sports Unlimited Wallpaper Mural &#; Click for Sizes and Prices

Donna loved the wallpaper but was leaning towards a hockey logo on Nolin’s wall, so I showed her my hand-painted hockey murals.

Hand-Painted Murals for a Hockey Bedroom

I’ve been painting murals since all over Southern Ontario – and even got the chance to paint a mural for a Mike Holmes TV Show!

Since I had already painted some hockey logos, I brought photos of these hockey bedrooms for Donna to see.

P.S. if you love these hand-painted team logos, get in touch for a quote.  They start at $ and I paint anywhere within driving distance of Hamilton, Ontario.

A Toronto Maple Leafs mural painted by Adrienne of AboutMurals.caA Pittsburgh Penguins mural painted by Adrienne of AboutMurals.ca

Nolin’s Hockey Bedroom: Montreal Canadiens

A hockey bedroom painted in Montreal Canadiens theme by Adrienne of AboutMurals.ca

Nolin fell in LOVE with the hand-painted hockey logos, and wanted his fave team painted – the Montreal Canadiens.  This is what his room looked like once it was all painted and put back together.

How can I help you get your own hockey bedroom?

  • Buy wallpaper! I sell cool sports themed wallpaper murals that ship for free in the USA and Canada.
  • Hire me! I hand-paint murals in Southern Ontario.  Get in touch for a free quote.
  • DIY! If you’d like to paint your own mural, keep scrolling to see how I created Nolin’s hockey bedroom.  I’d love to see your handy-work when you’re all done – remember to tag me in your social media!

How I painted this Montreal Canadiens Mural

Once Nolin decided on the Habs logo, we had to hammer out the design idea.  Since three walls would be painted in white, Donna and Nolin thought a red feature wall would look super cool.

Montreal Canadiens hockey jersey

So we used the Home Jersey as inspiration for his mural.

A boys bedroom without paint or trim, before it was turned into a hockey bedroom by AboutMurals.ca

Here’s the “Before” shot of Nolin’s bedroom, before it was painted.

First coat of paint starting the Montreal Canadiens mural painted by AboutMurals.ca

We choose Benjamin Moore Ice Mist (OC) for the white walls and the mural stripe in the Montreal Canadiens logo.

Once I finished painting the base coat, I got to work free hand drawing the mural on the wall and adding the first coat of red paint.

TIP: Anytime I paint red, I allow myself enough time (and enough paint) to do about 4 coats…or more.  Coverage in red paint isn’t very good (usually yellow and green paint too).

The Montreal Canadiens mural in progress being painted by Adrienne of AboutMurals.ca

I added green painter’s tape for the horizontal lines.  Check out my super sneaky tip to get really crisp paint lines.

As I let one coat of red dry, I started to add the blue.

I’d go back and forth between the red and blue as each one dried.

Peeling painter&#;s tape off of the Montreal Canadiens mural painted by Adrienne of AboutMurals.ca

Then…my favourite part…peeling off the painters tape!

It’s just like crossing something off a to-do list.

Is there anyone else out there who gets a kick out of these things, or am I alone?

Muralist Adrienne stands next to the Montreal Canadiens mural she painted

Ta-da!  A fun hockey bedroom painted (that’s also perfect for a man cave, basement bar, pub or home office).

Curious how I paint murals?

If you&#;d love to know how I hand-paint my kids murals, you’ll love being a part of my newsletter community.

I’ll share all my inside secrets on how I craft these masterpieces like the type of paint I use, how I create my sketches and the stories behind the designs I put together so that you can decide if we’re a good fit to work together.

Sours: https://aboutmurals.ca/blog/boys-bedroom-ideashockey-bedroom/
  1. Motorcycle arm protection
  2. Biggest wire nut
  3. Komo bikes
  4. New vegas rifle

The Fine Art Of Stopping A Flying Puck

Jordan Binnington, goaltender for the St. Louis Blues, looks on during the Blues' playoff series with the San Jose Sharks. Binnington may be a rookie playing in his first Stanley Cup Final, but he has been taking part in a tradition that dates back decades. Tom Pennington/Getty Images hide caption

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Tom Pennington/Getty Images

Jordan Binnington, goaltender for the St. Louis Blues, looks on during the Blues' playoff series with the San Jose Sharks. Binnington may be a rookie playing in his first Stanley Cup Final, but he has been taking part in a tradition that dates back decades.

Tom Pennington/Getty Images

When the St. Louis Blues take the ice Monday, they may look a little green. This series against the Boston Bruins marks the first time the franchise has skated in a Stanley Cup Final since In other words, nearly two and a half decades before their rookie goaltender, Jordan Binnington, was even born.

At the same time, for all his youth, the team's year-old netminder will be taking part in the same decades-old tradition as his veteran Bruin counterpart, Tuukka Rask. Both goalies will don masks drenched with vibrant color and baroque twists on their team icons. For Binnington, that means a hazy glimpse of St. Louis' Arch-adorned skyline; for Rask, that means a snarling golden bear.

Both masks also represent something the uninitiated may not have expected to find on an ice surface: art, history — even high fashion, of a sort.

"I will tell you that it's a huge thing for a goalie to look good," says former goaltender Ron Tugnutt, who played for eight teams across his year NHL career. "A lot of children want to grow up to be goalies because they see these masks."

Ron Tugnutt, seen here playing for the Ottawa Senators in , says he got the idea for a splash design a few years earlier while playing for the Montreal Canadiens, which was owned by the Molson family. For that reason the original idea was to mimic beer, but he continued to use the splash design (with new colors) for each of the teams he went on to play for. Robert Laberge/Getty Images hide caption

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Robert Laberge/Getty Images

Ron Tugnutt, seen here playing for the Ottawa Senators in , says he got the idea for a splash design a few years earlier while playing for the Montreal Canadiens, which was owned by the Molson family. For that reason the original idea was to mimic beer, but he continued to use the splash design (with new colors) for each of the teams he went on to play for.

Robert Laberge/Getty Images

Young hockey fans of the s had little trouble recognizing Tugnutt's masks. For about a decade leading up to his retirement in , his were splashed with team colors — a nod to the Molsons, the brewing dynasty that owned the Montreal Canadiens, the team he played for when Tugnutt got the idea. But he brought the design with him wherever he went, just swapping in new team colors each time and rendering his mask readily recognizable for hockey fans.

Plenty of other goalie masks — from Curtis Joseph's rabid dog (for Cujo, naturally) to Eddie Belfour's eagle — have also gotten the household name treatment. So many, in fact, that , people annually flock to the Hockey Hall of Fame in Toronto for an exhibit that displays historic goalie masks with an awed respect befitting precious artifacts.

While the focus remains trained on the players protected by these flashy blends of art and athletics, the cottage industry of artists that has grown up around their production gets little attention. By one hockey historian's estimation, about a dozen major artists work with goaltenders in the NHL and NWHL, and dozens more ply their trade at other levels, such as minor leagues and youth hockey.

And those artists often develop just as intimate a connection with the mask they've created as the player who wears it.

Curtis Joseph, then still playing for the Toronto Maple Leafs, warms up before a game in New York City in The word "Cujo" is scrawled on the side of this Frank Cipra-designed mask — a reference both to his nickname and Stephen King's novel about a rabid dog, here represented with maw opened wide on the front. Bruce Bennett/Getty Images hide caption

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Bruce Bennett/Getty Images

Curtis Joseph, then still playing for the Toronto Maple Leafs, warms up before a game in New York City in The word "Cujo" is scrawled on the side of this Frank Cipra-designed mask — a reference both to his nickname and Stephen King's novel about a rabid dog, here represented with maw opened wide on the front.

Bruce Bennett/Getty Images

"Any mask that I've done, there's a story behind it," says Frank Cipra, the artist who designed Tugnutt's distinctive headgear. "There's a key element in the design that each player wanted that meant something to them. And it meant something to me that I could carry that on for them and make them happy and proud."

These days he says he doesn't do masks for NHL players anymore — he prefers the slower pace of the lower levels — but in the early s, not long after he got started, Cipra was one of just a handful of artists who designed just about every mask in the league. And that meant a whole lot of work.

"I was working, no kidding, 24/7. It was just insane. The orders were coming from all NHL teams, the American [Hockey] League, U.S. college teams, the Olympics," he recalls. "It was just nonstop."

Some goalie masks have all but entered the realm of fine art. Here's Nana Fujimoto's headgear when she played for the Japanese national team during the Winter Olympics. Harry How/Getty Images hide caption

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Harry How/Getty Images

Some goalie masks have all but entered the realm of fine art. Here's Nana Fujimoto's headgear when she played for the Japanese national team during the Winter Olympics.

Harry How/Getty Images

This sudden increase in demand could be traced to a commensurate increase simply in the number of goalies, according to Jim Hynes, who with Gary Smith wrote a history of goalie masks called Saving Face.

After the early '90s NHL expansions, "you have minor league teams, you have 26 NHL teams — two goalies per team. All kinds of work for mask painters," Hynes explains. "So you have new guys popping up now, you have companies getting into the business of making masks. Some of them could be mass-produced to be sold to goalies of all levels and ages, and the pros were getting their masks custom-made."

Some artists — including Cipra — had deals with major equipment manufacturers, while others operated independently. Eventually, an influx of new artists raced in to meet the demand. That includes David Gunnarsson, the Swedish designer responsible for Binnington's mask and dozens of others, as well as David Arrigo, who designed new masks for every goalie in the NWHL during the women's pro league's inaugural year.

David Arrigo also designed the mask that Canada goaltender Genevieve Lacasse wore during the Olympics. Here she is playing against the U.S. national team during the preliminary rounds. Nathan Denette/AP hide caption

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Nathan Denette/AP

David Arrigo also designed the mask that Canada goaltender Genevieve Lacasse wore during the Olympics. Here she is playing against the U.S. national team during the preliminary rounds.

Nathan Denette/AP

"There was maybe only two or three guys, really, doing it 20 years ago," says Arrigo, who has been in the business about a decade and a half now. "Today, I can name you off a dozen artists and they're all pure goalie mask artists."

That's a far cry from the equipment industry of Gerry Cheevers' era.

Cheevers was in net for the Bruins when they beat the Blues in that Stanley Cup Final, the last time the Blues made it this far. He's also just happens to be credited with with being the first men's ice hockey player to paint his headgear, during a practice in the late '60s. He didn't have much to choose from. It was less than a decade since the Montreal Canadiens' Jacques Plantes — who won five consecutive Stanley Cups and was inducted into the Hall of Fame — pioneered the use of goalie masks in men's ice hockey, and just a thin bit of fiberglass was still about all Cheevers had.

Jacques Plante, the goaltender who helped lead the Montreal Canadiens to five straight Stanley Cup wins, began using a mask after a shot to the face injured his nose in November Despite the initial objections of his coach, he kept using it even after his nose healed — and as the Canadiens continued to win, his coach's objections quietly subsided. AP hide caption

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AP

Jacques Plante, the goaltender who helped lead the Montreal Canadiens to five straight Stanley Cup wins, began using a mask after a shot to the face injured his nose in November Despite the initial objections of his coach, he kept using it even after his nose healed — and as the Canadiens continued to win, his coach's objections quietly subsided.

AP

So after Cheevers took a particularly nasty shot in the face during practice, the legend goes, he left the ice to head to the locker room and collect himself.

"When the coach comes in and tells him to get back out there, Cheevers grabs a magic marker and draws a line of stitches where the puck had hit him. Afterwards, he continued to do that — every time the puck hit him in the face he'd have a trainer or himself draw stitches where it hit him, until the thing was pretty much completely covered with them," Hynes says.

Gerry Cheevers, who won two Stanley Cups with the Bruins and later was inducted to the Hockey Hall of Fame, sports his iconic mask during a practice. He'd draw new sets of stitches on that white bit of headgear every time he took a shot to the face. The way he saw it, he would have had to get those stitches for real if he hadn't been wearing that mask. AP hide caption

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AP

Gerry Cheevers, who won two Stanley Cups with the Bruins and later was inducted to the Hockey Hall of Fame, sports his iconic mask during a practice. He'd draw new sets of stitches on that white bit of headgear every time he took a shot to the face. The way he saw it, he would have had to get those stitches for real if he hadn't been wearing that mask.

AP

"That was a good idea of what his face might have looked like if he hadn't been wearing that mask," Hynes adds. "It became his trademark."

The art of mask decoration has evolved quite a bit since those early days. With a big boost from trailblazers such as Greg Harrison, Cheevers' novelty gradually became the norm among goalies, and the intricacy of the art multiplied with the number of goalies who wore it.

As time went on, there were sharks baring their teeth and Lady Liberty and Godzilla itself, all painted on surfaces designed to block a rubber object flying at speeds regularly topping 90 mph. There was even Carey Price's Arrigo-designed tribute to his Canadiens forebear — a deeply unsettling depiction of Jacques Plante wearing his mask painted atop Price's own mask.

(Seriously, just look at it. But maybe not while small children are present.)

The increasing intricacy makes for much more of a challenge these days — including some rather intense conversations between goaltender and artist that could sometimes go so far as to resemble a session with a therapist.

"Years ago, I would tell them, 'I want to get into your head.' And that freaks a lot of people out," Arrigo laughs.

He says he's adopted a mellower approach lately, but the crucial question remains the same for him and every other artist: What does the player really want?

"What happens is, we'll get into it. We'll get into arguments like crazy," Arrigo says of one of his clients, an NHL goalie with very particular ideas of what he wants.

"Then his wife will get involved and she'll play between us and all this stuff. And then when we get to the final concepts — and I hate saying this to him — but it's like, 'This is what I suggested in the first place!' And he says, 'No it's not.' And on and on."

At other times, these conversations can spark some incidental magic.

Corey Hirsch, a former NHL goalie and current color analyst for the Vancouver Canucks, recalls having worked with Cipra during a particularly dark time in his life. It was in the mid-'90s, after Hirsch had been brought in to play for the Canucks, and the young man was suffering from a mental illness it took him years to have diagnosed as obsessive-compulsive disorder. As he revealed many years later, his struggles even drove him to the brink of suicide.

Corey Hirsch, seen during his playing days with the Vancouver Canucks. The mask, which was designed by Frank Cipra and inspired by Psycho, even features Alfred Hitchcock's famous silhouette above Hirsch's eyes. These days, the mask holds special significance for the former goalie. J Giamundo/Getty Images hide caption

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J Giamundo/Getty Images

Corey Hirsch, seen during his playing days with the Vancouver Canucks. The mask, which was designed by Frank Cipra and inspired by Psycho, even features Alfred Hitchcock's famous silhouette above Hirsch's eyes. These days, the mask holds special significance for the former goalie.

J Giamundo/Getty Images

So, when Cipra and Hirsch settled on a Halloween theme — "He called me up and said he wanted something dark, almost evil," Cipra remembers — it struck a nerve when someone brought up the house from Hitchcock's Psycho. Hirsch quickly decided.

"I didn't know what I was going through right at the time. I had no idea. I just thought I was going crazy — really, like anybody else would. So the Psycho house was like, 'Huh, how fitting is this,' " Hirsch recalls.

The mask became so famous, it's now featured in the Hockey Hall of Fame.

"It makes for a really amazing reminder of what I went through, because I've been healthy 20 years now since I got therapy and help. Sometimes these days I don't even remember how bad it was," he says. "So it's a great reminder of where I came from at one point in my life, and where I am today."

Ron Tugnutt, the goalie known for his splash design, also keeps his masks — roughly a dozen of them — as markers of memory, albeit it in a different way.

"I have a son that was born while I played in Portland, Maine, so that mask is in his bedroom, and I have a son from my time in Anaheim, Calif., and that mask is in his bedroom," Tugnutt says.

But don't think that this bond between a goalie and his mask, as strong as it may be, is unbreakable. Even art bows before that great god, superstition.

"If pucks start going in, it doesn't matter," he laughs. "You take your helmet off, you take a look and you go, 'I need another one. What am I doing wearing this one?' "

In that case, it's time to get your friendly neighborhood mask artist back on the line.

Sours: https://www.npr.org//05/27//the-fine-art-of-stopping-a-flying-puck
8 CEMENT IDEAS THAT ARE SO EASY - 2020 Cool Cement DIY Projects Ideas

How to Paint a Room Like a Hockey Rink

By Jennifer Blair

Painting your floor with the regulation red and blue lines can really give your room an authentic hockey rink look.

Whether you're decorating a game room or a child's bedroom, a design that resembles a hockey rink is bound to be a hit with anyone who loves chasing after pucks. While you can use accessories to help bring the theme to life, painting the room to resemble the ice surface usually offers the most authentic look. It also allows you to customize the design so that your room resembles your favorite team's rink right down to the scoreboard that hangs above.

Go Two-Toned

For a simple take on the hockey rink theme, use two different tones for the top and bottom of your walls. By dividing the walls in half, you'll recreate the look of the boards that wall in the ice at a regulation hockey rink. You can paint the top portion a basic white or gray, but for the lower half, use one of your favorite hockey team's uniform colors to customize the look. For a finished look, install chair rail along the seam between the two colors – paint it to match the lower half of the wall to really sell the illusion of boards that span the perimeter of the room.

Stencil Some Details

If you want to add a few more details to your faux hockey board design, use stencils to personalize your room's look. With number and alphabet stencils, paint replicas of the banners or retired jersey numbers that hang above your favorite rink's ice. Stencils are also available in the shape of hockey players, including goalies and forwards taking a shot, allowing you to add some action to your room's design. You can even use a stencil to paint your own Stanley Cup, the award handed out to the championship winning team in the National Hockey League each year.

Go Elaborate

When you really want to add an authentic look to your room, stencils may not cut it. Instead, you may want to paint a customized mural that allows you to add realistic detail to the room's design. If you've painted the walls in a two-two color scheme to mimic the look of the boards, paint cheering fans in the stands on the upper portion of the wall. You can also recreate the benches where the two teams sit or the infamous penalty box where players are sent when they violate the rules of the game. On one wall, you may want to create a mural of an actual goal and net. On the upper portion of a wall, add a replica of your favorite team's scoreboard and personalize it with the names of family members or your favorite players.

Don&#;t Forget the Floor

While the walls are probably the first area that you think to paint when creating a hockey rink room, don't overlook the floor. If you've got wooden flooring, you can paint it to resemble the ice surface. Start with a white base coat and then use red and blue paint to add in the red center line and the blue lines in each half of the ice. You can also paint in details like the face-off circles, goal line and goal crease to really give the room an authentic look.

References

Writer Bio

Based in New York City, Jennifer Blair has been covering all things home and garden since Her writing has appeared on BobVila.com, World Lifestyle, and House Logic. Blair holds a Bachelor of Arts in Writing Seminars from the Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore, Maryland.

Sours: https://homeguides.sfgate.com/paint-room-like-hockey-rinkhtml

Ideas hockey painting

Asked & Answered: How is the ice in hockey rinks painted?

If not for Kate, with the following question, I believe I would have never known how this particular process takes place. Now that she has asked, I oddly want to know the answer. It's sometimes the most random questions that generate the most interest. See what you think….about painting hockey ice.

Asked & answered

Question from Kate: How do they paint the ice in a hockey rink?

Answer: Phoenix Coyotes beat reporter for azcentral sports Sarah McLellan tracked down the answer. She took it directly to the ice technician for the Phoenix Coyotes, JJ Straker. Straker explains the process, in detail:

White powdered paint is mixed with water in a large tank creating a liquid paint mix. This paint is then applied to the ice surface with a large foot spray boom and a pump. Two to three coats are applied to cover the surface. This is then sealed in with fine water spray, which freezes. The next step is to measure out where all of the lines/circles/logos are to go. Blue/red lines are strung in place and you paint in between the lines – just like we learned in kindergarten. Circles are painted with a pre-measured circle maker with a paint stick on the end. One person holds the center of the circle in place while another travels in a circle around them painting the circle. Hash marks and encroachment lines are all measured and painted in place along with the creases and referee's circle. Logos are stenciled in place and then hand painted. All of the painted surfaces get sealed in place so they don't run when heavy water is placed on top to build up the ice.

Sours: https://www.azcentral.com/story/news//04/30/how-is-the-ice-in-hockey-rinks-painted//
30 UNBELIEVABLE STONE HACKS AND DIYs

Ice hockey craft idea for preschoolers

This page includes alot of free ice hockey craft ideas for kids.Do these crafts with your students with your child and enjoy.

Children are your future…

You can also send your free crafts in this page.

Mail: [email protected]

Show More

Sours: https://www.funnycrafts.us/ice-hockey-craft-ideas/

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