Vtec leaking oil

Vtec leaking oil DEFAULT

Do VTEC solenoids leak oil?

Is Your VTEC Solenoid Gasket Leaking Oil? Still, the VTEC solenoid gasket is a very common problem, not only for external oil leaks, which are visible, but for internal oil leaks, which only show up as a failure in the VTEC system, poor engine performance, and possibly a “Check Engine” light.

What happens when your VTEC solenoid is bad?

If the VVT solenoid fails or is blocked, the lack of proper lubrication can cause the timing chain and gear to prematurely wear or break entirely. There are several other problems that may occur when a VVT solenoid is wearing out or has broken that may extend to complete engine failure.

What does a VTEC solenoid valve do?

The VTEC solenoid actually allows oil to flow to the internal galleries of the overhead camshaft. This means that the housing of the solenoid is holding back full engine oil pressure.

How do you bypass a VTEC solenoid?

This can be easily bypassed with a simple wiring trick: On your engine harness, locate the VTEC oil pressure switch plug/wire (this wire comes from OBD1 ECU pin D6). Use a common T-tap or other method and simply tap this into the VTEC solenoid valve wire (the VTEC solenoid wire comes from OBD1 ECU pin A4).

How much is it to replace a transmission solenoid?

The transmission solenoid replacement cost for one single solenoid is between $15 and $100, while the pack is between $50 and $300, the labor between $120 and $400, and the total pack costing between $250 and $600 for the complete transmission solenoid replacement cost.

What does a bad solenoid sound like?

One of the first and most common signs of a bad starter solenoid is hearing weird rapid clicking sounds. These sounds happen as the solenoid is not receiving the right amount of electrical current. One of the main reasons for this issue is loose connections and issues with the wiring.

Why won’t my car start but has power?

If your vehicle won’t start, it’s usually caused by a dying or dead battery, loose or corroded connection cables, a bad alternator or an issue with the starter. It can be hard to determine if you’re dealing with a battery or an alternator problem.

Sours: https://www.mvorganizing.org/do-vtec-solenoids-leak-oil/

Replacement of Leaking VTEC Oil Pressure Switch on the 2003 Accord

Following the leak I had from the VTEC solenoid spool valve assembly which I aimed to repair by replacing the filter on the assembly (catch that DIY here), the leak continued. With the engine running and looking down at the VTEC spool valve assembly, I could just see the oil flowing slowly from the base of the VTEC oil pressure switch to the rear of the assembly.

VTEC oil pressure switch leak

Oil leak from VTEC oil pressure switch as seen from under the vehicle

My research online pointed to a worn VTEC oil pressure switch o-ring as the almost definite cause. I changed the o-ring in question, but the leak continued. I then felt this was because I used an aftermarket o-ring. I ordered for the OEM VTEC oil pressure switch o-ring from Honda and fitted that. That didn’t stop the leak either. With this, I turned my attention elsewhere. A quick feel of the junction between the metal and plastic parts of the VTEC oil pressure switch got oil on my finger. Voila!!! The leak was coming from this exact junction.

VTEC oil pressure switch leak

VTEC oil pressure switch leaking from the highlighted point

Enough of the history. Hope it helped. Its dirt time! For the purpose of making the procedure complete, I would address this DIY as though I hadn’t changed the o-ring for the switch earlier.

Materials: 22mm deep socket, ratchet with extension (30cm is more than adequate), 10mm socket or spanner, torque wrench (recommended, but won’t stop you from carrying out the repair if unavailable)

VTEC oil pressure switch

Materials for replacing VTEC oil pressure switch

Steps:

1. Detach the electric connector of the VTEC pressure switch and the 2nd electrical connector attached to the VTEC solenoid spool valve assembly.

2. Using the 22mm deep socket, extension bar and ratchet, break the seal on the pressure switch, but leave it in place. This would make it easier for you to loosen the part when you remove the whole assembly from the cylinder head.

VTEC oil pressure switch

Breaking the seal of the VTEC oil pressure switch

NB: If you had recently replaced your VTEC oil pressure switch o-ring you can actually finish the procedure without bringing down the spool valve assembly. Simply take out the old part and continue with steps 7&9. If you are replacing the o-ring I advise bringing down the assembly to prevent dirt from getting into the groove for the pressure switch.

3. Remove the VTEC solenoid spool valve assembly from the cylinder head. All steps can be found in this earlier post

4. Remove the old VTEC oil pressure switch from the assembly.

5. Remove the old pressure switch o-ring from its groove and discard. If this is difficult to do by hand, use the curved tip of say a 1mm copper wire to remove the old o-ring.

Removing the VTEC oil pressure switch o-ring

Removing the old o-ring

VTEC pressure switch o-ring

Old & new o-ring. L-new, R-old. The old had flattened over time

6. Insert the new VTEC oil pressure switch o-ring in its groove.

 o-ring for VTEC

New VTEC oil pressure switch o-ring in place

7. Screw on the new part (PN: 37250-PNE-G01) by hand. I bought a used part from Mgbuka Obosi motor parts market. (Watch out for the post on buying good used parts!)

iVTEC pressure switch

Replacement switch. It came with the red OEM o-ring!

8. Refit the VTEC spool valve assembly onto the cylinder head (once again, steps are found in this previous post)

9. Torque the new VTEC oil pressure switch to 22Nm using the torque wrench and follow reverse steps.

Torquing VTEC oil pressure switch to 22Nm

Torquing VTEC oil pressure switch to 22Nm

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Leaking VTEC, Leaking VTEC oil pressure switch, Replacing VTEC, Replacing VTEC oil pressure switch, Valve, valve timing, VTEC, VTEC oil pressure switch, VTEC spool valve assembly

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Cam Seal/ Vtec Solenoid Oil Leak

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Ok, I got some oil dripping down the side of my block and im going through oil like its cool, and it appears to be from the Vtec solenoid/ cam seal area.
My questions are as follows:
1) Which is more common? Can I replace just the solenoid gasket or do I have to replace the whole assembly?
2) To replace the cam seals; can I just pry them out and then take a rubber mallet to the new ones?
3) Who should I get them from and what brands do you reccomend?
If this is for a b series, you can replace the vtec spool valve gasket/filter, the Honda part number is 15825-P08-005. and the cam seals are somewhat prone to leak. if you replace it, take off the valve cover, remove the cam hold down plates, and then the cam journals, when you replace either part, apply a small amount of hondabond, and this should ensure they wont leak.
B16
:werd:
Originally posted by JOHNNYLIGHTFOOT@Jan 21 2004, 07:07 PM
If this is for a b series, you can replace the vtec spool valve gasket/filter, the Honda part number is 15825-P08-005. and the cam seals are somewhat prone to leak. if you replace it, take off the valve cover, remove the cam hold down plates, and then the cam journals, when you replace either part, apply a small amount of hondabond, and this should ensure they wont leak.

Thanks. Any idea of what the torque specs are for the cam journal bolts? And would you reccomend using OE cam seals or aftermarket?
I have that happening, it's annoying, not really osingany significant amount of oil, so I am ignoring it for now.
B16
Originally posted by xyswany+Jan 21 2004, 03:10 PM-->
@Jan 21 2004, 07:07 PM
If this is for a b series, you can replace the vtec spool valve gasket/filter, the Honda part number is 15825-P08-005. and the cam seals are somewhat prone to leak. if you replace it, take off the valve cover, remove the cam hold down plates, and then the cam journals, when you replace either part, apply a small amount of hondabond, and this should ensure they wont leak.

Thanks. Any idea of what the torque specs are for the cam journal bolts? And would you reccomend using OE cam seals or aftermarket?

use OE cam seals
i have the tq specs in my helms at home, i should be able to make it home tonight and post them for you, unless someone else has theirs handy.
STR makes a good cam seal. I put one in my car and it works perfect. Its better than the OE one because it had double seals, and its colored metal insted of cheap plastic, that will probably begin to leak again. dont pry it out you have to remove valve cover, pull off oiling rail over the exhaust cam, and then remove the cam hold down piece. i have torque specs somewhere around here, but dont know where. its probably like 10-15ft lbs- thats what most 10mm bolts are. also use some rtv silicone gasket maker high temp when you do it, so it really wont leak.
B16
cam cap torque specs for B series
16lb-ft (bolt size 8x1.25 mm)
EXCEPT
the outermost 8 bolts (both sides, intake and exh)
8lb-ft (bolt size 6x1.0 mm)
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Honda Oil Leak Fix VTEC Solenoid

Thread: Slow oil leak by VTEC solenoid

  • 07-25-2012, 23:56#1

    darksparkz is offline
    Registered User

    Slow oil leak by VTEC solenoid

    So theres been this slow oil leak it seems right by the rear valve cover of the car, right next to the cam seals and by the vtec solenoid. It doesn't hit the ground because it gets burnt up by the exhaust.

    I'm thinking of replacing valve cover gaskets and the rubber cam seals, any ideas on what else should be replaced in that area?


  • 07-26-2012, 10:04#2

    pgilliam1 is offline
    Charter Silver pgilliam1's Avatar

    Re: Slow oil leak by VTEC solenoid

    Your leak is probably the cam plug (cam seals are a different part). This happens on all of these engines. Also, there are 2 gaskets that need to be replaced on each of the VTEC solenoids (spool valves). These will also leak oil - eventually.

    Last edited by pgilliam1; 07-26-2012 at 10:06.


  • 07-26-2012, 21:33#3

    darksparkz is offline
    Registered User

    Re: Slow oil leak by VTEC solenoid



    As for the cam plugs, you mean #10 right?

    Which are the gaskets for the spool valves, #10 and #16?


  • 07-27-2012, 18:37#4

    nikey22 is offline
    Registered User nikey22's Avatar

    Re: Slow oil leak by VTEC solenoid


  • 07-29-2012, 16:50#5

    pgilliam1 is offline
    Charter Silver pgilliam1's Avatar

    Re: Slow oil leak by VTEC solenoid

    Yes, the cam plugs are #10 in your top diagram.

    Last edited by pgilliam1; 07-30-2012 at 06:13.


  • 07-30-2012, 06:08#6

    06_typeS is offline
    Registered User 06_typeS's Avatar

    Re: Slow oil leak by VTEC solenoid

    Great thread. I have the same problem, got under the car last night an seen that it was leaking from looked like the vtec soliniod. Ill be getting those replaced when I take the car in for service.

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  • 07-30-2012, 06:39#7

    davidf is offline
    Charter Platinum davidf's Avatar

    Re: Slow oil leak by VTEC solenoid

    Be 100% sure about the cam plugs before you begin. It's a "not so small" job and it would be a waste of time if not. Personally I would clean it with brakleener and drive it a week. This will give you a better idea of where it's leaking from.

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  • 07-30-2012, 07:53#8

    Honcho is offline
    Site Super ModeratorHoncho's Avatar

    Re: Slow oil leak by VTEC solenoid

    FWIW, I have spoken to larryB at length about various oil leaks and he has almost never seen a cam plug that is actually leaking. 9 times out of 10 it is the valve covers or spool valves. As mentioned, while the cam plugs themselves are cheap, the replacement procedure requires lifting or removing the cams- not an easy job.

    Before you head down this complex route, clean off the head around the cam plugs with brake cleaner and wipe completely clean. Drive the car hard for a few days and check the area. I betting it is your valve cover gasket- mine was pouring oil on my rear manifold too.

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    Leaking oil vtec

    How to Replace a Honda VTEC Solenoid Gasket & Prevent Engine Oil Leaks

    Honda VTEC Oil Leak Tips - BE FORWARD

    Honda is one of those Japanese companies that has absolutely nailed the fuel-efficient, fun-to-drive compact car. Aside from winning manufacturing processes, Honda’s engine technology is one of the most reliable in the world. Of course, this means they last a lot longer on the road, and while the mechanical parts may last, the soft rubber parts eventually wear or simply dry out, especially oil seals.

    Repairing oil leaks is a common repair on older Honda engines, including valve cover gaskets, spark plug tube gaskets, front and rear crankshaft seals, and even the oil pan. In this article we will look at how you can repair your Honda’s VTEC solenoid gasket from leaking oil.

    Is Your VTEC Solenoid Gasket Leaking Oil?

    Typically, the VTEC solenoid valve gasket is often overlooked because of the valve cover gasket right above it, which means that any oil residue may have come from the problematic valve cover gasket. Still, the VTEC solenoid gasket is a very common problem, not only for external oil leaks, which are visible, but for internal oil leaks, which only show up as a failure in the VTEC system, poor engine performance, and possibly a “Check Engine” light. Fortunately, this is an easy DIY fix, as long as you have the right tools and supplies. Better yet, you can do this in about half an hour.

    Necessary Tools & Supplies

    • Replacement gaskets, ordered from Honda or your local aftermarket parts specialist
    • Shallow 10 mm socket and 3-inch extension on a small 3/8-inch-drive ratchet
    • 3/8-inch drive torque wrench (The best way to torque these bolts is with a torque wrench. The specification is very light, just 9 foot-pounds, so be careful not to break the bolts, as repairs can become very expensive, very quickly, in case a bolt breaks due to over-torquing.)
    • Short #2 Phillips head screwdriver
    • Masking tape and black marker
    • Clean rags, clean engine oil, 400–600 grit sandpaper or a green Scotch-Brite abrasive pad, nitrile rubber gloves
    • Brake cleaner spray

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    How to Replace a VTEC Solenoid Gasket

    • First, shut the engine off and wait for it to cool off, maybe 30 minutes to an hour, because hot oil and engine parts aren’t comfortable to work with. Make sure the key is in the “Off” position, so you don’t set any diagnostic trouble code (DTC) or the “Check Engine” light.
    • To get access to the VTEC solenoid valve itself, you may want to move the spark plug cables out of the way. Use strips of masking tape and the black marker to mark them 1 – 2 – 3 – 4, so you can put them back in their proper places without guessing. You can just pop the cables off and pull them forward off the distributor cap. (Depending on model, the VTEC solenoid may be on the back of the engine, which may require putting the front of the car on jack stands or ramps. Otherwise, the procedure is the same.)
    • Unplug the two electrical connectors, the grey one for the solenoid, and the green one for the oil pressure sensor. Use the screwdriver to remove the bracket screw, so you can access the bolts.
    • Stuff a rag in the area under the valve to catch the oil that will spill. Loosen the three 10 mm bolts that hold the valve housing to the block, and then remove them by hand and set the valve aside.
    • Use rubber gloves to protect your skin and sandpaper or a Scotch-Brite pad to clean the gasket contact area of any backed-on oil residue or pieces of gasket. Clean it one more time with a rag.
    An example of a Honda VTEC engine from online used car dealer BE FORWARD.

    Above: An example of a Honda VTEC engine

    • On your workbench, you can take the old gasket and screen out of the valve housing. Use rolled-up sandpaper or a Scotch-Brite pad to lightly clean the grooves of baked-on oil residue or gasket material. Clean the valve and sealing surfaces with brake cleaner.
    • If you only need to replace the main valve gasket go ahead to Step 8. However, if the gasket between the solenoid and the valve needs to be replaced, continue on with steps 7 (1–3). Note: special care needs to be taken if you are replacing the gasket between the solenoid (the electrical part) and the valve (the mechanical part), as there are loose pieces which will fall out if this is done incorrectly.
    1. Use the socket to loosen the three bolts holding the solenoid to the valve. Then, holding the unit so the solenoid is in a vertical position, remove the three bolts by hand.
    2. Lift the solenoid carefully off the valve, then put your finger in over the end of the valve to keep it from falling out. Set the solenoid aside and use sandpaper or a Scotch-Brite pad to clean the sealing surfaces and grooves. Clean it with brake cleaner.
    3. Install the new solenoid seal, lightly oiled, then carefully place the solenoid back over the valve, installing the three bolts by hand until they are finger tight. Use the torque wrench to tighten the bolts to their final torque.
    • Position the new screen in its place first, then lightly oil the new gasket and put it in its place.
    • Return the VTEC solenoid valve unit back into its place, threading in the three bolts by hand until they are finger tight. Again, use the torque wrench to tighten the bolts to their final torque.
    • Reinstall the bracket and plug in the two electrical connectors. Plug in the spark plug wires. Check and adjust oil level. Start the car and run it for a few minutes, checking for any obvious leaks.

    In spite of the fact that the VTEC solenoid valve is a common problem, it is often overlooked. Fortunately, given about a half hour and the proper tools, you should be able to take care of it without any trouble and prevent any future engine oil leaks.

    Sours: https://blog.beforward.jp/carlife/car-maintenance-tips/honda-vtec-oil-leaks-weve-covered.html
    Honda Civic: How to FIX Distributor and Vtec Solenoid Leak

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