Tablo setup assistant

Tablo setup assistant DEFAULT

GEMPACK manual

gempack word cloud

Mark Horridge, Michael Jerie, Dean Mustakinov, Florian Schiffmann

17 Dec 2019
ISBN 978-1-921654-90-9

This online version of the GEMPACK documentation is designed for effective searching and navigation within your browser. You can click on on any blue link to jump to the indicated place, and use the Back button to return. Use the middle mouse button to open a link in a new tab. A yellow panel is visible at top right, with links to the Contents page and Index. To find information on a particular topic, go to the Index first. You can also use your browser's Edit..Find command to search through the entire document.

You can use your browser's View menu to adjust the text size. Or, using your keyboard, press CTRL and + or CTRL and - to zoom in or out. If your mouse has a wheel, hold down the CTRL key, and then scroll the wheel to zoom in or out. You may need to wait a second or two to see the effect.

This manual refers to GEMPACK Release 12 and later — but will be useful too for earlier releases.

Each section or subsection has a "topic ID" which appears in green at the end of section headings. GEMPACK programs may emit warning or error messages that refer you to sections of this manual. The references may include section numbers, section titles and topic IDs, but the topic ID is most likely to remain unchanged through successive revisions of the manual.

If you want to print out sections, use the matching PDF file, GPmanual.pdf.

We thank Ken Pearson and Jill Harrison who wrote large parts of previous GEMPACK manuals; much of their work is incorporated here.

A condition of your GEMPACK licence is that acknowledgement of GEMPACK must be made when results that have been obtained with GEMPACK are reported. To cite this manual, use:

Horridge J.M., Jerie M., Mustakinov D. & Schiffmann F. (2018), GEMPACK manual, GEMPACK Software, ISBN 978-1-921654-34-3

Other GEMPACK-related citations are suggested in section 1.7.

  • 1 Introduction[gpd1.1]
  • 2 Installing GEMPACK on Windows PCs[gpd6.1]
  • 3 How to carry out simulations with models[gpd1.2]
  • 4 Building or modifying models[gpd1.3]
  • 5 Header Array files[harfiles]
  • 6 Constructing HAR files[gpd1.4]
  • 7 GEMPACK file types, names and suffixes[gpd1.5.8]
  • 8 Overview of running TABLO and the TABLO language[gpd2.1]
  • 9 Additional information about running TABLO[gpd2.2]
  • 10 The TABLO language: basic syntax[gpd2.3]
  • 11 Syntax and semantic details[gpd2.4]
  • 12 TABLO statements for post-simulation processing[gpd5.2]
  • 13 Ranking sets via data (finding winners and losers)[gpd5.3]
  • 14 Condensing models[condense]
  • 15 Verifying economic models[gpd2.6]
  • 16 Intertemporal models[gpd2.7]
  • 17 Less obvious examples of the TABLO language[gpd2.8]
  • 18 Linearizing levels equations[gpd2.9]
  • 19 Overview of simulation reference chapters 20 to 35[gpd3.1]
  • 20 Command (CMF) files[gpd3.2]
  • 21 TABLO input files and auxiliary files[gpd3.3]
  • 22 CMF statements for data files, updated data files and display files[gpd3.4]
  • 23 Specifying the closure[gpd3.5.1a]
  • 24 Specifying the shocks[gpd3.5.5]
  • 25 Actions in GEMSIM and TABLO-generated programs[gpd3.6]
  • 26 Multi-step solution methods[gpd3.7]
  • 27 Solution (SL4) files[gpd3.8]
  • 28 SLC, UDC, AVC and CVL files[slcfiles]
  • 29 Subtotals via GEMSIM or TABLO-generated programs[gpd3.11]
  • 30 Solving models and simulation time[gpd3.12]
  • 31 Solving a model in parallel on a machine with two or more processors[gpd9.2]
  • 32 Memory management[gpd3.13]
  • 33 Options for GEMSIM and TABLO-generated programs[gpd3.14]
  • 34 Run-time errors[gpd3.15]
  • 35 Summary of command file statements[gpd3.18]
  • 36 GEMPACK Windows programs[gpd4.2]
  • 37 Command-line programs for working with header array files[gpd4.4]
  • 38 Syntax of GEMPACK text data files[gpd4.6]
  • 39 SLTOHT: processing simulation results[gpd4.8]
  • 40 SLTOHT for spreadsheets[gpd4.9]
  • 41 ACCUM and DEVIA : accumulation and differences[gpd4.10]
  • 42 Hands-on tutorials for models supplied with GEMPACK[gpd8.1]
  • 43 Getting started with GEMPACK via WinGEM[gpd8.2]
  • 44 Command prompt: hands-on computing[gpd8.3]
  • 45 Using RunGEM for simulations[gpd8.5]
  • 46 Using AnalyseGE to analyse simulation results[gpd8.6]
  • 47 Print edition ends here[endprint]
  • 48 Working with GEMPACK command-line programs[gpd1.5]
  • 49 Miscellaneous information[miscstuff]
  • 50 Code options when running TABLO[gpd2.5]
  • 51 Simulations for models with complementarities[gpd3.16]
  • 52 Subtotals with complementarity statements[gpd5.7]
  • 53 More examples of post-simulation processing[postsim2]
  • 54 Using MODHAR to create or modify header array files[gpd4.3]
  • 55 Ordering of variables and equations in solution and equation files[ordering]
  • 56 SEENV: to see the closure on an environment file[gpd4.12]
  • 57 Automated homogeneity testing[autohomog]
  • 58 Several simultaneous Johansen simulations via SAGEM[gpd3.10]
  • 59 Equations files and LU files[gpd3.9]
  • 60 Example models supplied with GEMPACK[models]
  • 61 Pivoting, memory-sharing, and other solution strategies[pivots]
  • 62 Limited executable-image size limits[exelimits]
  • 63 Some technical details of GEMPACK[technical]
  • 64 Rarely used features of GEMPACK programs[legacy]
  • 65 Choosing sets of variables interactively[gpd4.17]
  • 66 Older ways to choose closure and shocks[oldshkclos]
  • 67 Improving your TAB and CMF files[better]
  • 68 Shock statements designed for use with RunDynam[rdynshoks]
  • 69 GEMPACK on Linux, Unix or Mac OS X[unix]
  • 70 TEXTBI : extracting TAB, STI and CMF files from AXT, SL4 and CVL files[gpd4.14]
  • 71 History of GEMPACK[oldnewfeat]
  • 72 TABLO-generated programs and GEMSIM - timing comparison[gpd8.4]
  • 73 Fortran compilers for Source-code GEMPACK[fortrans]
  • 74 LTG variants and compiler options[gpd6.7.5a]
  • 75 Fine print about header array files[gpd4.5]
  • 76 Converting binary files: LF90/F77L3 to/from Intel/LF95/GFortran[gpd4.15]
  • 77 Translation between GEMPACK and GAMS data files[gdxhar]
  • 78 Recent GEMPACK with older RunGTAP or RunDynam[gpd5.12]
  • 79 SUMEQ: information from equations files[gpd4.13]
  • 80 Older GEMPACK documents[gemdocs]
  • 81 References[references]
  • 82 Index[index]
  • 83 End of document[docend]
  • 1 Introduction[gpd1.1]
  • 2 Installing GEMPACK on Windows PCs[gpd6.1]
  • 3 How to carry out simulations with models[gpd1.2]
  • 4 Building or modifying models[gpd1.3]
  • 5 Header Array files[harfiles]
  • 6 Constructing HAR files[gpd1.4]
  • 7 GEMPACK file types, names and suffixes[gpd1.5.8]
  • 8 Overview of running TABLO and the TABLO language[gpd2.1]
  • 9 Additional information about running TABLO[gpd2.2]
  • 10 The TABLO language: basic syntax[gpd2.3]
  • 11 Syntax and semantic details[gpd2.4]
    • 11.1 General notes on the TABLO syntax and semantics[gpd2.4.1]
    • 11.2 User defined input[gpd2.4.2]
    • 11.3 Quantifiers and quantifier lists[gpd2.4.3]
    • 11.4 Expressions used in equations, formulas and updates[gpd2.4.4]
    • 11.5 Functions[gpd2.4.4.4]
    • 11.6 Coefficients and levels variables[gpd2.4.5]
    • 11.7 Sets[gpd2.4.6]
    • 11.8 Subsets[gpd2.4.7]
    • 11.9 Mappings between sets[gpd2.4.8]
    • 11.10 Files[gpd2.4.9]
    • 11.11 Reads, writes and displays[gpd2.4.10]
    • 11.12 Updates[gpd2.4.11]
    • 11.13 Transfer statements[gpd2.4.12]
    • 11.14 Complementarity semantics[gpd2.4.14]
    • 11.15 The RAS_MATRIX function[gpd9.7.10]
    • 11.16 Ordering[gpd2.4.15]
    • 11.17 TABLO input files with no equations[gpd2.4.16]
    • 11.18 Loops in TAB files[loop-tab]
  • 12 TABLO statements for post-simulation processing[gpd5.2]
  • 13 Ranking sets via data (finding winners and losers)[gpd5.3]
  • 14 Condensing models[condense]
  • 15 Verifying economic models[gpd2.6]
  • 16 Intertemporal models[gpd2.7]
  • 17 Less obvious examples of the TABLO language[gpd2.8]
  • 18 Linearizing levels equations[gpd2.9]
  • 19 Overview of simulation reference chapters 20 to 35[gpd3.1]
  • 20 Command (CMF) files[gpd3.2]
  • 21 TABLO input files and auxiliary files[gpd3.3]
  • 22 CMF statements for data files, updated data files and display files[gpd3.4]
  • 23 Specifying the closure[gpd3.5.1a]
  • 24 Specifying the shocks[gpd3.5.5]
  • 25 Actions in GEMSIM and TABLO-generated programs[gpd3.6]
  • 26 Multi-step solution methods[gpd3.7]
  • 27 Solution (SL4) files[gpd3.8]
  • 28 SLC, UDC, AVC and CVL files[slcfiles]
  • 29 Subtotals via GEMSIM or TABLO-generated programs[gpd3.11]
  • 30 Solving models and simulation time[gpd3.12]
  • 31 Solving a model in parallel on a machine with two or more processors[gpd9.2]
  • 32 Memory management[gpd3.13]
  • 33 Options for GEMSIM and TABLO-generated programs[gpd3.14]
  • 34 Run-time errors[gpd3.15]
  • 35 Summary of command file statements[gpd3.18]
  • 36 GEMPACK Windows programs[gpd4.2]
  • 37 Command-line programs for working with header array files[gpd4.4]
  • 38 Syntax of GEMPACK text data files[gpd4.6]
  • 39 SLTOHT: processing simulation results[gpd4.8]
  • 40 SLTOHT for spreadsheets[gpd4.9]
  • 41 ACCUM and DEVIA : accumulation and differences[gpd4.10]
  • 42 Hands-on tutorials for models supplied with GEMPACK[gpd8.1]
  • 43 Getting started with GEMPACK via WinGEM[gpd8.2]
  • 44 Command prompt: hands-on computing[gpd8.3]
  • 45 Using RunGEM for simulations[gpd8.5]
  • 46 Using AnalyseGE to analyse simulation results[gpd8.6]
  • 47 Print edition ends here[endprint]
  • 48 Working with GEMPACK command-line programs[gpd1.5]
  • 49 Miscellaneous information[miscstuff]
  • 50 Code options when running TABLO[gpd2.5]
  • 51 Simulations for models with complementarities[gpd3.16]
  • 52 Subtotals with complementarity statements[gpd5.7]
  • 53 More examples of post-simulation processing[postsim2]
  • 54 Using MODHAR to create or modify header array files[gpd4.3]
  • 55 Ordering of variables and equations in solution and equation files[ordering]
  • 56 SEENV: to see the closure on an environment file[gpd4.12]
  • 57 Automated homogeneity testing[autohomog]
  • 58 Several simultaneous Johansen simulations via SAGEM[gpd3.10]
  • 59 Equations files and LU files[gpd3.9]
  • 60 Example models supplied with GEMPACK[models]
  • 61 Pivoting, memory-sharing, and other solution strategies[pivots]
  • 62 Limited executable-image size limits[exelimits]
  • 63 Some technical details of GEMPACK[technical]
  • 64 Rarely used features of GEMPACK programs[legacy]
  • 65 Choosing sets of variables interactively[gpd4.17]
  • 66 Older ways to choose closure and shocks[oldshkclos]
  • 67 Improving your TAB and CMF files[better]
  • 68 Shock statements designed for use with RunDynam[rdynshoks]
  • 69 GEMPACK on Linux, Unix or Mac OS X[unix]
  • 70 TEXTBI : extracting TAB, STI and CMF files from AXT, SL4 and CVL files[gpd4.14]
  • 71 History of GEMPACK[oldnewfeat]
  • 72 TABLO-generated programs and GEMSIM - timing comparison[gpd8.4]
  • 73 Fortran compilers for Source-code GEMPACK[fortrans]
  • 74 LTG variants and compiler options[gpd6.7.5a]
  • 75 Fine print about header array files[gpd4.5]
  • 76 Converting binary files: LF90/F77L3 to/from Intel/LF95/GFortran[gpd4.15]
  • 77 Translation between GEMPACK and GAMS data files[gdxhar]
  • 78 Recent GEMPACK with older RunGTAP or RunDynam[gpd5.12]
  • 79 SUMEQ: information from equations files[gpd4.13]
  • 80 Older GEMPACK documents[gemdocs]
  • 81 References[references]
  • 82 Index[index]
  • 83 End of document[docend]

 

Click here for detailed chapter contents

GEMPACK (General Equilibrium Modelling PACKage) is a suite of economic modelling software designed for building and solving applied general equilibrium models. It can handle a wide range of economic behaviour and contains powerful capabilities for solving intertemporal models. GEMPACK calculates accurate solutions of an economic model, starting from an algebraic representation of the model equations. These equations can be written as levels equations, linearized equations or a mixture of these two.

The software includes a range of utility programs for handling the economic data base and the results of simulations, and is fully documented with plenty of examples.

GEMPACK provides

  • a simple language in which to describe and document the equations of your economic model;
  • a program which converts the equations of your model to a form ready for running simulations;
  • options for varying the choice of endogenous, exogenous and shocked variables;
  • powerful tools to help you understand or analyze simulation results;
  • utility programs to assist in managing model databases. The data can be inspected, modified, or converted to other formats, such as spreadsheets;
  • programs to generate reports from simulation results or from inital data.

New features of GEMPACK Release 12 (2018) are listed in section 71.12. New features introduced for versions of GEMPACK Release 11 (2011-16) are listed in sections 71.8 and 71.9.

The remainder of this chapter contains the following sections:

  • 1.1 Organization of this manual
  • 1.2 Using this manual
  • 1.3 Supported Operating Systems
  • 1.4 The GEMPACK programs
  • 1.5 Models supplied with GEMPACK
  • 1.6 Different versions of GEMPACK and associated licences
  • 1.7 Citing GEMPACK
  • 1.8 Communicating with GEMPACK
  • 1.10 Acknowledgments

1.1    Organization of this manual [manualoutline]

Remaining chapters of this manual are organized as follows:

  • Chapter 2 is a guide to installing GEMPACK on your Windows PC.
  • Chapters 3 to 7 are an Introduction to GEMPACK. New users should first work through these. Chapter 3 tells you how to carry out simulations with models, while chapter 4 tells you how to build or modify models. Chapter 6 describes data files and how to construct them. Chapter 7 describes GEMPACK file types, names and suffixes.
  • Chapters 8 to 18 are a comprehensive description of the TABLO language, used to specify GEMPACK models. They also include instructions for running the TABLO program.
  • Chapters 19 to 35 tell how to run simulations, using GEMSIM, TABLO-generated programs or SAGEM. They also describe the Command (CMF) Files used to specify details of simulations.
  • Chapters 36 to 41 describe other GEMPACK programs. Chapter 36 describes Windows programs such as WinGEM, ViewHAR, Charter, ViewSOL, TABmate, RunGEM, AnalyseGE and RunDynam. Chapters 37 to 41 describe command-line programs, including SLTOHT, ACCUM and DEVIA.
  • Chapters 42 to 46 contain a guide to the example models supplied with GEMPACK, and hands-on instructions for using WinGEM, AnalyseGE, RunGEM, and other GEMPACK programs.
  • The remaining chapters include more technical material, References, and the Index.

1.2    Using this manual [usingmanual]

This manual is available in two formats which you can view on your PC:

  • An HTML document, gpmanual.htm. Each GEMPACK Windows program should provide a link to this file, via the Help menu.
  • A PDF document, gpmanual.pdf. You can print out excerpts from this (but not the whole document — it is very long!).

In each case the Contents and Index sections should help you find the information you need.

Each section or subsection has a "topic ID" which appears in green at the end of section headings. GEMPACK programs may emit warning or error messages that refer you to sections of this manual. The references may include section numbers, section titles and topic IDs, but the topic ID is most likely to remain unchanged through successive revisions of the manual.

Previous GEMPACK documentation was contained in a number of separate manuals called GPD-1 to GPD-9. Now most of these documents have been revised and consolidated into this single manual. A list of GEMPACK documents (including the former GPD documents) is given in chapter 80.

1.2.1    For experienced GEMPACK users [gpd1.1.5.2]

If you have worked with an earlier version of GEMPACK, the first thing you will want to see is a list of the new features. The latest new feature list is at the webpage http://www.copsmodels.com/gprelnotes.htm. There is a summary in section 71.12 below. Features introduced for previous GEMPACK Releases are listed in chapter 71.

1.2.2    For new GEMPACK users — getting started [gpd1.1.5.1]

We suggest you read the Introduction to GEMPACK chapters 3 to 7, working through the examples.

We have built these chapters around the sorts of modelling tasks you will want to do. The most important of these tasks are:

  • Carrying out simulations with an existing model. Looking at and analysing the results.
  • Building a new model or modifying an existing model.
  • As part of building a new model or modifying an existing model, you may need to build or modify the data files for the model.

We suggest that you begin with the first of these tasks (simulations). Chapter 3 tells you how to carry out simulations with existing models, and how to look at the results. We suggest that you read this in detail and carry out the simulations described there for yourself. This chapter includes detailed hands-on instructions for using the relevant GEMPACK programs. You will find sufficient detail there to carry out all the steps involved.

The simulations in chapter 3 are based on the Stylized Johansen model, which is a small model. Even if your purpose in using GEMPACK is to work with another model (possibly ORANI-G or GTAP), we strongly recommend that you work through chapter 3 in detail first. After that, you will be in a position to carry out simulations with your chosen model.

At the end of chapter 3 we give suggestions as to what to do next. Roughly speaking, the possibilities are:

  • If you mainly want to carry out simulations with another standard model, you will find a list of the models supplied with GEMPACK in section 1.5. You will find detailed hands-on guidance in chapters 42 to 46 about carrying out standard simulations with many of these models.
Sours: https://www.copsmodels.com/gpmanual.htm

Hardware Installation Guide for Cisco 4000 Series Integrated Services Routers

Install and Connect Cisco 4000 Series ISRs

This chapter describes how to install and connect Cisco 4000 Series Integrated Services Routers (ISRs) to LAN, WAN, and Voice networks. The following sections provide technical details.

warn.gif

Warningblank.gif To reduce the risk of electric shock, secure the modules with provided screws. Statement 347


warn.gif

Warningblank.gif To reduce the risk of electric shock, the chassis of this equipment needs to be connected to permanent earth ground during normal use. Statement CS-0445


warn.gif

Warningblank.gif To reduce risk of electric shock and fire, a readily accessible two-poled disconnect device must be incorporated in the fixed wiring. Statement 1022


warn.gif

Warningblank.gifTo see translations of the warnings that appear in this publication, see the Regulatory Compliance and Safety Information for the Cisco 4000 Series ISRsdocument. Only trained and qualified personnel should be allowed to install, replace, or service this equipment. Statement 1030


warn.gif

Warningblank.gif This unit might have more than one power supply connection. All connections must be removed to de-energize the unit. Statement 1028


warn.gif

Warningblank.gif Blank faceplates and cover panels serve three important functions: they prevent exposure to hazardous voltages and currents inside the chassis; they contain electromagnetic interference (EMI) that might disrupt other equipment; and they direct the flow of cooling air through the chassis. Do not operate the system unless all cards, faceplates, front covers, and rear covers are in place. Statement 1029


warn.gif

Warningblank.gif Hazardous network voltages are present in WAN ports regardless of whether power to the unit is OFF or ON. To avoid electric shock, use caution when working near WAN ports. When detaching cables, detach the end away from the unit first. Statement 1026


warn.gif

Warningblank.gif This equipment must be grounded. Never defeat the ground conductor or operate the equipment in the absence of a suitably installed ground conductor. Contact the appropriate electrical inspection authority or an electrician if you are uncertain that suitable grounding is available. Statement 1024


warn.gif

Warningblank.gif Before opening the unit, disconnect the telephone-network cables to avoid contact with telephone-network voltages. Statement 1041


warn.gif

Warningblank.gif Do not use this product near water; for example, near a bath tub, wash bowl, kitchen sink or laundry tub, in a wet basement, or near a swimming pool. Statement 1035


warn.gif

Warningblank.gif Never install telephone jacks in wet locations unless the jack is specifically designed for wet locations. Statement 1036


warn.gif

Warningblank.gif Never touch uninsulated telephone wires or terminals unless the telephone line has been disconnected at the network interface. Statement 1037


warn.gif

Warningblank.gif Avoid using a telephone (other than a cordless type) during an electrical storm. There may be a remote risk of electric shock from lightning. Statement 1038


warn.gif

Warningblank.gif To report a gas leak, do not use a telephone in the vicinity of the leak. Statement 1039


warn.gif

Warningblank.gifThis unit is intended for installation in restricted access areas. A restricted access area can be accessed only through the use of a special tool, lock and key, or other means of security. Statement 1017


warn.gif

Warningblank.gifBlank faceplates and cover panels serve three important functions: they prevent exposure to hazardous voltages and currents inside the chassis; they contain electromagnetic interference (EMI) that might disrupt other equipment; and they direct the flow of cooling air through the chassis. Do not operate the system unless all cards, faceplates, front covers, and rear covers are in place.
Statement 1029


warn.gif

Warningblank.gif The covers are an integral part of the safety design of the product. Do not operate the unit without the covers installed. Statement 1077


warn.gif

Warningblank.gif Instructed person is someone who has been instructed and trained by a skilled person and takes the necessary precautions when working with equipment. Skilled person/Qualified personnel is someone who has training or experience in the equipment technology and understand potential hazards when working with equipment. Statement 1089


warn.gif

Warningblank.gif Only skilled person should be allowed to install, replace, or service this equipment. Refer to statement 1089 for description of skilled person. Statement 1090


warn.gif

Warningblank.gif Only instructed person or skilled person should be allowed to install, replace, or service this equipment. Refer to statement 1089 for description of skilled person. Statement 1091


warn.gif

Warningblank.gif This equipment must be grounded.To reduce the risk of electric shock, the power cord, plug or combination must be connected to a properly grounded electrode, outlet or terminal. Statement 1252—Equipment Grounding


Before You Begin

Before installing and connecting a Cisco 4000 Series Integrated Services Router, read the safety warnings and gather the following tools and equipment.

  • ESD-preventive cord and wrist strap
  • Number 2 Phillips screwdriver
  • Flat-blade screwdrivers: small, 3/16-in. (4 to 5 mm) and medium, 1/4-in. (6 to 7 mm)

blank.gif To install or remove modules

blank.gif To remove the cover, if you are upgrading memory or other components

  • Screws that fit your rack
  • Wire crimper
  • Wire for connecting the chassis to an earth ground:

blank.gif AWG 6 (13 mm) wire for NEBS-compliant chassis grounding

blank.gif AWG 14 (2 mm) or larger wire for NEC-compliant chassis grounding

blank.gif AWG 18 (1 mm) or larger wire for EN/IEC 60950-compliant chassis grounding

  • For NEC-compliant grounding, an appropriate user-supplied ring terminal, with an inner diameter of 1/4 in. (5 to 7 mm)

In addition, depending on the type of modules you plan to use, you might need the following equipment to connect a port to an external network:

  • Cables for connection to the WAN and LAN ports (dependent on configuration)
note.gif

Noteblank.gif For more information on cable specifications, see the Cisco Modular Access Router Cable Specifications document at cisco.com.


  • Ethernet hub or PC with a network interface card for connection to an Ethernet (LAN) port.
  • Console terminal (an ASCII terminal or a PC running HyperTerminal or similar terminal emulation software) configured for 9600 baud, 8 data bits, 1 stop bit, no flow control, and no parity.
  • Modem for connection to the auxiliary port for remote administrative access (optional).
  • Data service unit (DSU) or channel service unit/data service unit (CSU/DSU) as appropriate for serial interfaces.
  • External CSU for any CT1/PRI modules without a built-in CSU.

Also, you need to have access to the following:

CLI Console Access

Use the USB or RJ-45 console port on the router to access the Cisco Internet Operating System (IOS-XE) command line interface (CLI) on the router and to perform configuration tasks. A terminal emulation program is required to establish communication between the router and a PC. See the “Connect to Console Terminal or Modem” section for instructions.

note.gif

Noteblank.gif A Microsoft Windows USB driver must be installed before you establish physical connectivity between the router and the PC.


Slot and Port Numbers

The routers have built in ports and new slots. The new slots accommodate new modules and interface cards; SM-Xs, NIMs, ISCs, PVDM4s, and the Cisco E-Series Server modules. See the “Slots, Subslots (Bay), Ports, and Interfaces in Cisco 4000 Series ISRs” section for slot and port numbering.

Software Licenses

To install features on the router, you must purchase a software package. See the “Licensing” section of the Software Configuration Guide for the Cisco 4400 and Cisco 4300 Series ISRs.

Unpack the Router

Do not unpack the router until you are ready to install it. If the final installation site is not ready as yet, keep the chassis in its shipping container to prevent accidental damage. When you are ready to install the router, unpack it.

The router, accessory kit, publications, and any optional equipment you ordered may be shipped in more than one container. When you unpack the containers, check the packing list to ensure that you received all of the items on the list.

Install the Router

If you need to install Network Interface Modules (NIMs), Service Modules (SMs), and Field-Replaceable Units (FRUs), you can install them either before or after you install the router. Ideally, you install modules when you have the best access to the back panel of the router. Internal modules and FRUs, such as SMs, NIMs or Packet Voice Digital Signal Processor Module (PVDM4s), Compact Flash Cards, and fan trays should be installed before rack-mounting.

You can install the Cisco 4000 Series Integrated Services Routers in one of the following ways:

  • Set the router chassis on a desktop
  • Attach the router chassis to the wall (Cisco 4461, 4451, and 4351 ISRs do not support wall mounting.)
  • Mount the router chassis in a rack
warn.gif

Warningblank.gif Before working on a system that has an On/Off switch, turn OFF the power and unplug the power cord. Statement 1.


caut.gif
Cautionblank.gif To prevent damage to the chassis, never attempt to lift or tilt the chassis by holding it by the plastic panel on the front. Always hold the chassis by the sides of the metal body.

Set Chassis on Desktop

You can place the router on a desktop, bench top, or shelf.

note.gif

Noteblank.gif Do not set the chassis in an area where high acoustic noise can be an issue.


warn.gif

Warningblank.gif To prevent personal injury or damage to the chassis, never attempt to lift or tilt the chassis using the handles on modules (such as power supplies, fans, or cards); these types of handles are not designed to support the weight of the unit. Statement 1032.


caut.gif
Cautionblank.gif Do not place anything on top of the router that weighs more than 10 pounds (4.5 kg), and do not stack routers on a desktop. Excessive distributed weight of more than 10 pounds, or pound point load of
10 pounds on top could damage the chassis.
caut.gif
Cautionblank.gif Your chassis installation must allow unrestricted airflow for chassis cooling. For placing the router on a desktop, keep at least 1 inch (2.54 cm) of clear space beside the cooling inlet and exhaust vents.

After the router is installed, you must connect the chassis to a reliable earth ground. For the chassis ground connection procedures, see the “Chassis Grounding” section.

Attach Chassis to Wall or Mount Chassis in Rack

The tasks that you perform for attaching the router chassis to the wall, or for mounting it in a rack, are based on the specific model of the Cisco 4000 Series Integrated Service Router.

See the relevant installation sub-section for your specific router in the Cisco 4000 Series ISRs:

Install Cisco 4400 or 4300 ISR

This section describes the installation procedure that is common for all Cisco 4400 and 4300 Series ISRs.

note.gif

Noteblank.gif For illustration purposes, we have used images of Cisco 4400 Series ISRs in all figures. You cannot wall mount the Cisco 4461, 4451, and 4351 ISR as these routers do not support wall mounting.


Attach Cisco 4400 or 4300 ISR Chassis to Wall


Step 1blank.gif Attach the wall-mounting brackets to the router chassis as shown in Figure 3-1 using the four PHMS screws and the plastic spacers provided for each bracket.

Figure 3-1 Bracket Installation for Wall Mounting (Cisco 4431 ISR shown)

 

391424.eps
1

Machine screws (included in install kit)

2

Plastic spacers (included)

3

Wall-mounting hardware (customer supplied)

 

 

caut.gif
Cautionblank.gif Do not over-torque the screws. The recommended torque is 15 to 18 inch-lb (1.7 to 2.0 N-m).
note.gif

Noteblank.gif To attach to a wall stud, each bracket requires one number-10 wood screws (round- or pan-head) with number-10 washers, or two number-10 washer-head screws. The screws must be long enough to penetrate at least 1.5 inches (38.1 mm) into the supporting wood or metal wall stud.


note.gif

Noteblank.gif For hollow-wall mounting, each bracket requires two wall anchors with washers. Wall anchors and washers must be size number 10. Route the cables so that they do not put a strain on the connectors or mounting hardware.


caut.gif
Cautionblank.gif Your chassis installation must allow unrestricted airflow for chassis cooling.

Step 2blank.gif Attach the router to the wall using the brackets.

note.gif

Noteblank.gifIf you prefer, you can also install the router diagonally using the other two sides.


After the router is installed, you must connect the chassis to a reliable earth ground. For the chassis ground connection procedures, see the “Chassis Grounding” section.


 

Mount Cisco 4400 or 4300 ISR Chassis in Rack

warn.gif

Warningblank.gifIf the rack is provided with stabilizing devices, install the stabilizers before mounting or servicing the unit in the rack. Statement 1006


warn.gif

Warningblank.gif This equipment must be grounded. Never defeat the ground conductor or operate the equipment in the absence of a suitably installed ground conductor. Contact the appropriate electrical inspection authority or an electrician if you are uncertain that suitable grounding is available. Statement 1024


warn.gif

Warningblank.gif To prevent the system from overheating, do not operate it in an area that exceeds the maximum recommended ambient temperature of: 40 degrees C. Statement 1047


note.gif

Noteblank.gif Cisco 4461 ISR can operate in an area with an ambient temperature of 55 degrees C.


Cisco 4000 Series ISRs can be installed in 19-inch (48.26-cm) EIA and 23-inch (58.42-cm) Southwestern Bell Corporation (SBC) racks. Cisco 4000 Series ISRs can also be mounted in a 600-mm ETSI rack. Use the standard brackets shipped with the router for mounting the chassis in a 19-inch EIA rack; you can order optional larger brackets for mounting the chassis in a 23-inch SBC rack.

You can mount the router in the following ways:

  • Center-front mounting: Brackets attached in the center front of the chassis with only the front panel facing forward.
  • Center-back mounting: Brackets attached in the center back of the chassis with only the back panel facing forward.
  • Front mounting: Brackets attached at the front of the chassis with the front panel facing forward.
  • Back mounting: Brackets attached at the back of the chassis with the back panel facing forward.

Step 1blank.gif Attach the mounting brackets to the router chassis as shown in Figure 3-2 through Figure 3-5, using the screws provided.

caut.gif
Cautionblank.gif Do not over-torque the screws. The recommended torque is 15 to 18 inch-lb (1.7 to 2.0 N-m).

Attach the second bracket to the opposite side of the chassis. Use a number-2 Phillips screwdriver to install the number-8 bracket screws.

caut.gif
Cautionblank.gif Your chassis installation must allow unrestricted airflow for chassis cooling.

Figure 3-2 Bracket Installation for Front Mounting (Cisco 4451-X ISR shown)

 

302953.eps
1

23-inch SBC1 brackets

2

19-inch EIA brackets

Figure 3-3 Bracket Installation for Center-Front Mounting (Cisco 4451-X ISR shown)

 

302954.eps
1

23-inch SBC brackets

2

19-inch EIA brackets

Step 2blank.gif Use the screws provided with the rack to install the chassis in the rack. (See Figure 3-4 and Figure 3-6.)

For both the 19-inch EIA brackets and the 23-inch SBC brackets, start the lower pair of screws first, and rest the brackets on the lower screws while you insert the upper pair of screws.

tip.gif

Tipblank.gif The screw slots in the brackets are spaced to line up with every second pair of screw holes in the rack. When the correct screw holes are used, the small, threaded holes in the brackets line up with unused screw holes in the rack. If the small holes do not line up with the rack holes, you must raise or lower the brackets to the next rack hole.


 

warn.gif

Warningblank.gif



To prevent bodily injury when mounting or servicing this unit in a rack, you must take special precautions to ensure that the system remains stable. The following guidelines are provided to ensure your safety:
  • This unit should be mounted at the bottom of the rack if it is the only unit in the rack.
  • When mounting this unit in a partially filled rack, load the rack from the bottom to the top with the heaviest component at the bottom of the rack.
  • If the rack is provided with stabilizing devices, install the stabilizers before mounting or servicing the unit in the rack. Statement 1006

 
warn.gif

Warningblank.gif To prevent personal injury or damage to the chassis, never attempt to lift or tilt the chassis using the handles on modules (such as power supplies, fans, or cards); these types of handles are not designed to support the weight of the unit. Statement 1032


caut.gif
Cautionblank.gif Be sure to leave some space above and below each router in a rack to allow for cooling air circulation.

Figure 3-4 Bracket Installation for Back Mounting (Cisco 4451-X ISR shown)

 

302955.eps
1

23-inch SBC brackets

2

19-inch EIA brackets

Figure 3-5 Bracket Installation for Center-Back Mounting (Cisco 4451-X ISR shown)

 

302956.eps
1

23-inch SBC brackets

2

19-inch EIA brackets

Figure 3-6 shows a typical installation in a rack.

Figure 3-6 Mounting the Chassis in a Rack (Typical)

 

302994.eps

Figure 3-7 shows an installation with a chassis rear-forward.

Figure 3-7 Mounting the Chassis in a Rack, Rear Forward (Cisco 4451-X ISR shown)

 

302995.eps

After the router is installed, you must connect the chassis to a reliable earth ground. For the chassis ground connection procedures, see the “Chassis Grounding” section.


 

Install Cisco 4200 Series ISR

This section describes the installation procedure that is common for all Cisco 4200 Series ISRs.

note.gif

Noteblank.gif For illustration purposes, we have used images of Cisco 4221 ISR in all figures.


Attach Cisco 4200 ISR Chassis to Wall


Step 1blank.gif Attach the wall-mounting brackets to the router chassis as shown in Step 2 using the four PHMS screws and the plastic spacers provided for each bracket.

Figure 3-8 Bracket Installation for Wall Mounting (Cisco 4221 ISR shown)

 

385297.eps
1

Machine screws

 

 

note.gif

Noteblank.gif Do not over-torque the screws. The recommended torque is 15 to 18 inch-lb (1.7 to 2.0 N-m).


note.gif

Noteblank.gif To attach to a wall stud, each bracket requires one number-10 wood screws (round- or pan-head) with number-10 washers, or two number-10 washer-head screws. The screws must be long enough to penetrate at least 1.5 inches (38.1 mm) into the supporting wood or metal wall stud.


note.gif

Noteblank.gif For hollow-wall mounting, each bracket requires two wall anchors with washers. Wall anchors and washers must be size number 10. Route the cables so that they do not put a strain on the connectors or mounting hardware.


note.gif

Noteblank.gif Your chassis installation must allow unrestricted airflow for chassis cooling.


Step 2blank.gifAttach the router to the wall using the brackets.

After the router is installed, you must connect the chassis to a reliable earth ground. For the chassis ground connection procedures, see the “Chassis Grounding” section.


 

Mount Cisco 4200 ISR Chassis in Rack


Step 1blank.gif Attach the brackets to the router chassis (towards the front or back) as shown in Figure 3-10.

Figure 3-9 Bracket Installation for Front Mounting (Cisco 4221 ISR shown)

 

385354.eps
1

Mounting Screws

2

23-inch SBC brackets

Step 2blank.gif Use the screws provided with the rack to install the chassis in the rack. (See Figure 3-10.)

Figure 3-10 Bracket Installation for Back Mounting

 

385299.eps
1

Screws

2

23-inch SBC brackets

 

warn.gif

Warningblank.gif



To prevent bodily injury when mounting or servicing this unit in a rack, you must take special precautions to ensure that the system remains stable. The following guidelines are provided to ensure your safety:
  • This unit should be mounted at the bottom of the rack if it is the only unit in the rack.
  • When mounting this unit in a partially filled rack, load the rack from the bottom to the top with the heaviest component at the bottom of the rack.
  • If the rack is provided with stabilizing devices, install the stabilizers before mounting or servicing the unit in the rack. Statement 1006

 
warn.gif

Warningblank.gif To prevent personal injury or damage to the chassis, never attempt to lift or tilt the chassis using the handles on modules (such as power supplies, fans, or cards); these types of handles are not designed to support the weight of the unit. Statement 1032


caut.gif
Cautionblank.gif Be sure to leave some space above and below each router in a rack to allow for cooling air circulation.

After the router is installed, you must connect the chassis to a reliable earth ground. For the chassis ground connection procedures, see the “Chassis Grounding” section.


 

Mount Cisco 4200 ISR Chassis in Rack with AC Power Unit


Step 1blank.gif Attach the brackets to the router chassis (towards the left or right) as shown in Figure 3-11 and Figure 3-12.

Figure 3-11 AC Power Bracket Installation for Left Mounting (Cisco 4221 ISR shown)

 

385355.eps
1

Mounting Screws

2

AC power supply unit installation module

3

23-inch SBC brackets

4

19-inch SBC brackets

Figure 3-12 AC Power Bracket Installation for Right Mounting (Cisco 4221 ISR shown)

 

385357.eps
1

23-inch SBC brackets

2

19-inch SBC brackets

3

AC power supply unit installation module

 

 

After the router is installed, you must connect the chassis to a reliable earth ground. For the chassis ground connection procedures, see the “Chassis Grounding” section.


 

Chassis Grounding

warn.gif

Warningblank.gif This equipment must be grounded. Never defeat the ground conductor or operate the equipment in the absence of a suitably installed ground conductor. Contact the appropriate electrical inspection authority or an electrician if you are uncertain that suitable grounding is available. Statement 1024


warn.gif

Warningblank.gif During this procedure, wear grounding wrist straps to avoid ESD damage to the card. Do not directly touch the backplane with your hand or any metal tool, you could shock yourself. Statement 94


You must connect the chassis to a reliable earth ground; the ground wire must be installed in accordance with local electrical safety standards.

  • For grounding, use size 6 AWG (13 mm 2) copper wire and the ground lug provided in the accessory kit.
note.gif

Noteblank.gif This equipment is suitable for installation in Network Telecommunications Facilities and locations where the NEC applies. The equipment is suitable for installation as part of the Common Bonding Network (CBN).


  • For NEC-compliant grounding, use size 14 AWG (2 mm 2) or larger copper wire and an appropriate user-supplied ring terminal with an inner diameter of 1/4 in. (5–7 mm).
  • For EN/IEC 60950-1 and EN/IEC 62368-1 compliant grounding, use size 10 AWG (4 mm 2) or larger copper wire and an appropriate user-supplied ring terminal.

To install the ground connection for your router, perform the following steps:


Step 1blank.gif Strip one end of the ground wire to the length required for the ground lug or terminal.

  • For the ground lug: approximately 0.75 inch (20 mm)
  • For user-provided ring terminal: as required

Step 2blank.gif Crimp the ground wire to the ground lug or ring terminal using a crimp tool of the appropriate size.

Step 3blank.gif Attach the ground lug or ring terminal to the chassis as shown in Figure 3-13. For a ground lug, use the two screws with captive locking washers provided. For a ring terminal, use one of the screws provided. Tighten the screws to a torque of 8 to 10 in-lb (0.9 to 1.1 N-m).

 

Figure 3-13 Chassis Ground Connection on the Router (Cisco 4451-X ISR shown) Chassis

 

250915.eps

Step 4blank.gif Connect the other end of the ground wire to a known reliable earth ground point at your site.


 

Connect Power

This section explains how to connect AC power to the router.

warn.gif

Warningblank.gif Read the installation instructions before connecting the system to the power source. Statement 1004


warn.gif

Warningblank.gif This unit might have more than one power supply connection. All connections must be removed to de-energize the unit. Statement 1028


warn.gif

Warningblank.gif Only trained and qualified personnel should be allowed to install, replace, or service this equipment. Statement 1030


note.gif

Noteblank.gif The installation must comply with all required electrical codes applicable at the installation site.


warn.gif

Warningblank.gif When installing the product, please use the provided or designated connection cables/power cables/AC adaptors. Using any other cables/adaptors could cause a malfunction or a fire. Electrical Appliance and Material Safety Law prohibits the use of UL-certified cables (that have the “UL” shown on the code) for any other electrical devices than products designated by CISCO. The use of cables that are certified by Electrical Appliance and Material Safety Law (that have “PSE” shown on the code) is not limited to CISCO-designated products. Statement 371.


Connect to AC Power

If your router uses AC power, connect it to a 15 A, 120 VAC (10 A, 240 VAC) circuit with overcurrent protection.

note.gif

Noteblank.gif The input voltage tolerance limits for AC power are 90 and 264 VAC.


note.gif

Noteblank.gif This product requires surge protection to be provided as part of the building installation. To comply with the Telcordia GR-1089 NEBS standard for electromagnetic compatibility and safety, an external surge protective device (SPD) is required at the AC power service equipment.


warn.gif

Warningblank.gif AC connected units must have a permanent ground connection in addition to the power cable ground wire. NEBS-compliant grounding satisfies this requirement. Statement 284


warn.gif

Warningblank.gif This product requires short-circuit (overcurrent) protection, to be provided as part of the building installation. Install only in accordance with national and local wiring regulations. Statement 1045


warn.gif

Warningblank.gif This product relies on the building’s installation for short-circuit (overcurrent) protection. Ensure that the protective device is rated not greater than:
15A, 120VAC (16A, 240VAC). Statement 1005


 

Connect to Console Terminal or Modem

The router has asynchronous serial ports and auxiliary ports. These ports provide administrative access to the router either locally (with a console terminal or a PC) or remotely (with a modem).To configure the router through the Cisco IOS CLI, you must establish a connection between the router console port and a terminal or a PC.

Use the following cables and adapters to establish a local or remote connection.

 

Connect to Serial Port with Microsoft Windows

note.gif

Noteblank.gif Install the USB device driver before establishing a physical connection between the router and the PC using the USB Console cable plugged into the USB serial port; otherwise, the connection fails. See the “Install Cisco Microsoft Windows USB Device Driver” section.



Step 1blank.gif Connect the end of the console cable with the RJ-45 connector to the light blue console port on the router.

or

Connect a USB 5-pin mini USB Type-B to the USB console port as shown in Figure 3-14. If you are using the USB serial port for the first time on a Windows-based PC, install the USB driver now according to the instructions in the following sections.

note.gif

Noteblank.gif You cannot use the USB port and the EIA port concurrently. See “Connect WAN, LAN, and Voice Interfaces” section. When the USB port is used it takes priority over the RJ-45 EIA port.


Step 2blank.gif Connect the end of the cable with the DB-9 connector (or USB Type-A) to the terminal or PC. If your terminal or PC has a console port that does not accommodate a DB-9 connector, you must provide an appropriate adapter for that port.

Step 3blank.gif To communicate with the router, start a terminal emulator application. This software should be configured with the following parameters:

  • 9600 baud
  • 8 data bits
  • no parity
  • 1 stop bit
  • no flow control

 

Figure 3-14 Connecting the USB Console Cable to the Router (shown: Cisco ISR 4451-X)

 

302959.eps

 

1

USB 5-pin mini USB Type-B console port

2

USB 5-pin mini USB Type-B to USB Type-A console cable

3

USB Type-A

 

 

Connect to Console Port with Mac OS X

You connect a Mac OS X system USB port to the console using the built-in OS X Terminal utility.


Step 1blank.gif Use the Finder to go to Applications > Utilities > Terminal.

Step 2blank.gif Connect the OS X USB port to the router.

Step 3blank.gif Enter the following commands to find the OS X USB port number:

root:user$ cd /devroot:user$ ls -ltr /dev/*usb*crw-rw-rw- 1 root wheel 9, 66 Apr 1 16:46 tty.usbmodem1a21
DT-macbook:dev user$

 

Step 4blank.gif Connect to the USB port with the following command followed by the router USB port speed:

macbook:user$ screen /dev/tty.usbmodem1a21 9600

To disconnect the OS X USB console from the Terminal window

Enter Ctrl-a followed by Ctrl-\


 

Connect to Console Port with Linux

You connect a Linux system USB port to the console using the built-in Linux Terminal utility.


Step 1blank.gif Open the Linux Terminal window.

Step 2blank.gif Connect the Linux USB port to the router.

Step 3blank.gif Enter the following commands to find the Linux USB port number:

[email protected]# cd /[email protected] /dev# ls -ltr *ACM*crw-r--r-- 1 root root 188, 0 Jan 14 18:02 [email protected] /dev# 

Step 4blank.gif Connect to the USB port with the following command followed by the router USB port speed:

[email protected] /dev# screen /dev/ttyACM0 9600

To disconnect the Linux USB console from the Terminal window

Enter Ctrl-a followed by : then quit


 

Install Cisco Microsoft Windows USB Device Driver

A USB device driver must be installed the first time a Microsoft Windows-based PC is connected to the USB serial port on the router.

This section contains the following topics:

Install Cisco Microsoft Windows XP USB Driver

Before you begin, download the appropriate driver for your router model from the Cisco Software Download site, USB Console Software category: http://www.cisco.com/cisco/software/navigator.html?mode=prod


Step 1blank.gif Unzip the file Cisco_usbconsole_driver_X_X.zip (where X is the revision number).

Step 2blank.gif If you are using 32-bit Windows XP, double-click the file setup.exe from the Windows_32 folder; if you are using 64-bit Windows XP, double-click the file setup(x64).exe from the Windows_64 folder.

The Cisco Virtual Com InstallShield Wizard begins.

Step 3blank.gif Click Next. The Ready to Install the Program window appears,

Step 4blank.gif Click Install. The InstallShield Wizard Completed window appears.

Step 5blank.gif Click Finish.

Step 6blank.gif Connect the USB cable to the PC and router USB console ports. See Table 3-1. The EN LED for the USB console port turns green, and the Found New Hardware Wizard displays. Follow the instructions in the wizard to complete the installation of the driver.

The USB console is ready for use.


 

Install Cisco Microsoft Windows 2000 USB Driver


Step 1blank.gif Obtain the file Cisco_usbconsole_driver.zip from cisco.com and unzip it.

Step 2blank.gif Double-click the file setup.exe. The Cisco Virtual Com InstallShield Wizard begins.

Step 3blank.gif Click Next. The Ready to Install the Program window appears.

Step 4blank.gif Click Install. The InstallShield Wizard Completed window appears.

Step 5blank.gif Click Finish.

Step 6blank.gif Connect the USB cable to the PC and router USB console ports. See Table 3-1. The EN LED for the USB console port turns green, and the Found New Hardware Wizard window displays. Follow the instructions in the wizard to complete the installation of the driver.

The USB console is ready for use.


 

Install Cisco Microsoft Windows Vista USB Driver


Step 1blank.gif Obtain the file Cisco_usbconsole_driver.zip from cisco.com and unzip it.

Step 2blank.gif If you are using 32-bit Windows Vista, double-click the file setup.exe from the Windows_32 folder; if your are using 64-bit Windows Vista, double-click the file setup(x64).exe from the Windows_64 folder. The Cisco Virtual Com InstallShield Wizard begins.

Step 3blank.gif Click Next. The Ready to Install the Program window appears,

Step 4blank.gif Click Install. The InstallShield Wizard Completed window appears.

note.gif

Noteblank.gif If a User Account Control warning appears, click “Allow - I trust this program...” to proceed.


Step 5blank.gif Click Finish.

Step 6blank.gif Connect the USB cable to the PC and router USB console ports. See Table 3-1. The EN LED for the USB console port turns green, and a pop up window stating “Installing device driver software” appears. Follow subsequent instructions in the wizard to complete the installation of the driver.

The USB console is ready for use.


 

Uninstall Cisco Microsoft Windows USB Driver

To uninstall the Cisco Microsoft Windows USB device driver.

Uninstall Cisco Microsoft Windows XP and 2000 USB Driver

This procedure shows you how to uninstall both the Microsoft Windows XP and 2000 USB driver. The driver can be removed using the Windows Add Remove Programs utility or the setup.exe program.

Using the Add Remove Programs utility

note.gif

Noteblank.gif Disconnect the router console terminal before uninstalling the driver.



Step 1blank.gif Click Start > Control Panel > Add or Remove Programs.

Step 2blank.gif Scroll to Cisco Virtual Com and click Remove.

The Program Maintenance window appears,

Step 3blank.gif Select the Remove radio button. Click Next.


 

Using the Setup.exe program

note.gif

Noteblank.gif Disconnect the router console terminal before uninstalling the driver.



Step 1blank.gif Run the setup.exe for Windows 32-bit or setup(x64).exe for Windows-64bit. Click Next. The InstallShield Wizard for Cisco Virtual Com appears.

Step 2blank.gif Click Next. The Program Maintenance window appears.

Step 3blank.gif Select the Remove radio button and click Next. The Remove the Program window appears,

Step 4blank.gif Click Remove. The InstallShield Wizard Completed window appears.

Step 5blank.gif Click Finish.


 

Uninstall Cisco Microsoft Windows Vista USB Driver

note.gif

Noteblank.gif Disconnect the router console terminal before uninstalling the driver.



Step 1blank.gif Run the setup.exe for Windows 32-bit or setup(x64).exe for Windows-64bit. Click Next.

The InstallShield Wizard for Cisco Virtual Com appears.

Step 2blank.gif Click Next The Program Maintenance window appears.

Step 3blank.gif Select the Remove radio button and click Next. The Remove the Program window appears.

Step 4blank.gif Click Remove. The InstallShield Wizard Completed window appears.

note.gif

Noteblank.gif If a User Account Control warning appears, click “Allow - I trust this program...” to proceed.


Step 5blank.gif Click Finish.


 

Connect WAN, LAN, and Voice Interfaces

warn.gif

Warningblank.gifDo not work on the system or connect or disconnect cables during periods of lightning activity. Statement 1001


warn.gif

Warningblank.gif To avoid electric shock, do not connect safety extra-low voltage (SELV) circuits to telephone-network voltage (TNV) circuits. LAN ports contain SELV circuits, and WAN ports contain TNV circuits. Some LAN and WAN ports both use RJ-45 connectors. Use caution when connecting cables. Statement 1021


warn.gif

Warningblank.gif Hazardous network voltages are present in WAN ports regardless of whether power to the unit is OFF or ON. To avoid electric shock, use caution when working near WAN ports. When detaching cables, detach the end away from the unit first. Statement 1026


caut.gif
Cautionblank.gif To comply with the Telcordia GR-1089 NEBS standard for electromagnetic compatibility and safety, connect Gigabit Ethernet ports using RJ-45 connectors for shielded twisted pair cable only to intra-building or unexposed wiring or cable. The intra-building cable must be shielded and the shield must be grounded at both ends. The intra-building port(s) of the equipment or subassembly must not be metallically connected to interfaces that connect to the OSP or its wiring. These interfaces are designed for use as intra-building interfaces only (Type 2 or Type 4 ports as described in GR-1089-CORE, Issue 4) and require isolation from the exposed OSP cabling. The addition of Primary Protectors is not sufficient protection in order to connect these interfaces metallically to OSP wiring.
warn.gif

Warningblank.gif Never install telephone jacks in wet locations unless the jack is specifically designed for wet locations. Statement 1036


warn.gif

Warningblank.gif Never touch uninsulated telephone wires or terminals unless the telephone line has been disconnected at the network interface. Statement 1037


Ports and Cabling

Table 3-2 summarizes typical WAN, LAN, and voice connections for routers. The connections summarized here are also described in detail in Cisco Modular Access Router Cable Specifications.

Port or Connection Port Type, Color 2Connection: Cable

Ethernet

RJ-45, yellow

Ethernet hub or Ethernet switch

Category 5 or higher Ethernet

T1/E1 WAN
xCE1T1-PRI

RJ-48C/CA81A
RJ-48S, tan

T1 or E1 network
External T1 CSU or other T1 equipment

RJ-48 T1/E1
RJ-48S to RJ-48S TE
RJ-48S to RJ-48S NT
RJ-48S to RJ-48S T1
RJ-48S to bare
RJ-48S to BNC
RJ-48S to twinaxial cable
RJ-48S to DB-15
RJ-48S to DB-15 null

T3/DS3/E3 WAN

BNC connector

T3 network, CSU/DSU, or other T3/DS3 equipment

75-ohm coaxial cable

Cisco serial

60-pin D-sub, blue

CSU/DSU and serial network or equipment

Cisco serial transition cable that matches the signaling protocol (EIA/TIA-232, EIA/TIA-449, V.35, X.21, or EIA-530)
and the serial port operating mode (DTE or DCE).

Cisco Smart serial

Cisco Smart compact connector, blue

CSU/DSU and serial network or equipment

T1/E1 digital voice

RJ-48C/CA81A, tan

Digital PBX, ISDN network, CSU/DSU

RJ-48 T1/E1

Gigabit Ethernet SFP, optical

LC, color according to optical wavelength

1000BASE-SX, -LX, -LH, -ZX, -CWDM

Optical fiber as specified on applicable data sheet

Gigabit Ethernet SFP, copper

RJ-45

1000BASE-T

Category 5, 5e, 6 UTP

Connection Procedures and Precautions

  • Connect each WAN, LAN, and voice cable to the appropriate connector on the chassis or on a network module or interface card.
  • Position the cables carefully, so that they do not put strain on the connectors.
  • Organize cables in bundles so that cables do not intertwine.
  • Inspect the cables to make sure that the routing and bend radius is satisfactory. Reposition cables, if necessary.
  • Install cable ties in accordance with site requirements.

For cable pinouts, see Cisco Modular Access Router Cable Specifications.


 

.

 


Sours: https://www.cisco.com/c/en/us/td/docs/routers/access/4400/hardware/installation/guide4400-4300/C4400_isr/Install_Connect.html
  1. Anime priest boy
  2. Potion spell book
  3. Full power frost
  4. Doris duarte
  5. Mod allen test

Setup &
Networking

Owners of Tablo QUAD OTA DVRs have two options for recording storage:

  • USB-connected portable hard drives
    (USB 2.0 or 3.0, 1 TB to 8 TB in size)
  • Internal 2.5" SATA drives - spinning or SSD
    (Standard 7mm or 9.5mm heights, 1TB to 8TB in size*)

For USB-connected drives, we recommend Western Digital Elements drives and Seagate Expansion drives.

For SATA-connected drives, we recommend Western Digital Blue or Seagate BarraCuda internal drives. 

Most other brands/models are compatible, but avoid drives whose reviews suggest frequent disconnect problems.  

There are no speed or performance benefits from USB 3.0 and solid state drives (SSD) vs. USB 2.0 and spinning drives.

NOTE - Selecting an unsupported form of storage may result in failed recordings or buffering.

*Internal drives with the correct height dimensions are currently sold in up to 4TB size
Sours: https://www.tablotv.com/setup-networking/
How To Configure TabloConnect On An Edge Router

Diary Of A Cord Cutter In 2015 (Part 3: Using An Over-The-Air DVR)

This year, my New Year’s Resolution was to finally cut the cord. The timing is right, and the content selection available today on streaming services make the process much less painful than it was in years past. There’s plenty to watch – a glut of quality shows to keep me entertained for years, in fact. Meanwhile, my vastly reduced Verizon bill is the biggest payoff to come from the whole experience yet.

I’m now two months into the adventure, which I’ve documented here previously. (Read Part 1 & Part 2 here).

To summarize, I ditched Verizon cable TV, kept my FiOS internet service, and generally “watch TV” via Netflix, Amazon and Hulu Plus – all of which I pay for.

I invited readers to share their stories with me, and the responses have run the gamut – with everyone from teenaged TV viewers who cuddle up with laptops in bed, or supplement TV programming with YouTube videos and Twitch, to senior citizens watching over-the-air programs and not much else, to resourceful tech geeks figuring out how to turn old computers into DVRs and so on.

But one of the biggest pieces of reader feedback I’ve received to date had to do with antennas. There are increasing numbers of antenna users who have given up traditional television in exchange for free, over-the-air programming. For many, augmenting streaming services with free, live TV is just how it’s done.

I took a different path, though, choosing only to rely on streaming services. And people couldn’t believe it!

Mohu_MH-ANT1000_LifestyleCouple

An antenna felt like a band-aid to me, or perhaps just another kind of “cord” – one that didn’t cost anything, but kept you tied to traditional, “appointment” TV. A device that existed because the streaming services can’t deliver everything you need at this time.

Don’t get me wrong. I do understand there are gaps still to be filled. It’s nice to have an antenna for watching live sports (though I don’t) or big events (like the Oscars), or because you just can’t wait until the next day to watch the latest episode of The 100 (or insert your favorite show here).

But most of what the antenna provides – network programming – is either available on streaming services like Hulu, or can be bought via Season Passes on iTunes or Amazon, for example. For me, the antenna just doesn’t feel essential. Your mileage may vary.

For Cord Cutters Who Like Their Antennas, An Over-The-Air DVR

However, one thing that interested me about the antenna option was how it could be combined with a different type of DVR – one designed to record programs over-the-air. If this works well, you could theoretically ditch Hulu and still have access to much of the network programming Hulu offers. Of course, that would mean that you have to live without Hulu’s original programming, its expanding back catalog of older shows and its movie selection. You might not be willing to give all that up.

But if you primarily subscribe to Hulu just to watch a handful of new primetime shows, the DVR option is intriguing.

61bV36tvoiL._SL1000_

Plus, with DVRs, you’re not dependent on Hulu scoring a licensing deal with a given network for its content, which is something that’s still an issue today. For example, CBS keeps a lot of its top shows for itself. If you try to watch them on Hulu, the service redirects you to CBS.com instead. That’s because CBS wants you to upgrade to its “CBS All Access” service in order to watch more full episodes than it provides for free.

These content battles are always a challenge, and being dependent on streaming services alone mean you often lose access to a show.

Oh, and let’s not forget the best thing about DVRs: you can fast forward through the commercials!

This Week’s DVR: The Tablo

This week, I tried out the Tablo DVR, which competes with offerings from TiVo, Simple.TV, and others.

Like some of its competitors, Tablo works with your own USB hard drive. That gives you some flexibility in terms of storage capacity, but it also leads to a sort of junky-looking entertainment center where you’ve now piled on two more boxes where before, with your old cable TV subscription, you used to have just one.

61AEJjvAaPL._SL1111_

Setting It Up

The DVR also requires an antenna in order to work. I plugged mine into the Mohu Leaf 50, which was able to pick up more channels than my old antenna did. But I have to admit I find having an antenna aesthetically displeasing, despite this being one of the “better” options when it comes antennas that blend in with walls, and are thin and easy to hide behind furniture. It just so happens that my walls aren’t white like this antenna, and there’s no furniture in my entertainment nook that can hide it. However, thanks to the included tacks, it’s easy enough to mount.

Hooking up all the pieces to the Tablo DVR system isn’t hard – you plug in the antenna, hard drive and power plug. You can also plug it into ethernet, if you choose, but most will probably set up the system over Wi-Fi.

how_tablo_works

To get going, you download a mobile application to your iOS or Android device, or use a web browser to begin the setup process. Setup is simple enough – following the on-screen instructions, I connected my iPhone to Tablo’s Wi-Fi network, then configured it to use my home FiOS Wi-Fi by selecting it and entering the password.

During the first-time setup, Tablo will also need to format your USB hard drive. This can take up to an hour, says the company, depending on the size of your drive. You can, however, continue the setup process while the formatting runs in the background.

IMG_1471

You also need to go through the process of having Tablo scan for channels, much like what you have to do on a TV before you can watch over-the-air programming. This seemed to run a little slower than when I did the same thing on my television set directly before I had the DVR. But after a few minutes, Tablo found my local channels, helpfully identifying them with red, yellow and green dots, so you can determine which are of high enough quality to be worth adding.

IMG_1504

When the scan is complete, you check the channels you want to add them to the guide. Here, I did run into an issue – some of the channels I checked (which were green and fine to add) didn’t seem to make it into the guide the first time. That was frustrating not only because I had to then re-scan the channels and repeat the process again, but also because the process of “updating” Tablo’s guide is painfully slow.

At first I thought there was no progress indicator for the guide update, until I realized a few minutes later that the very small blue dot on the left side of the screen was actually the beginning of what ended up being a very slow-moving progress bar. To give you an idea, the company says that the download takes “several minutes” per channel added.

And it’s only downloading the first day of programming! The remaining 13 days are downloaded in the background, and afterwards, the guide updates take place overnight.

IMG_1472

Still, these issues were more of a one-time challenge, rather than ongoing problems. However, the takeaway was that while Tablo might be something I’d recommend to a fellow TechCrunch reader who can handle software that has a few kinks, I might not be prepared to recommend it to say, my mother-in-law or my dad at this time.

Using The App To Watch TV, Schedule Recordings 

After the setup completes, using the app to browse live TV, schedule or view recordings is easy. Navigation is self-explanatory. There are sections for Live TV, Prime Time, TV Shows, Movies, Sports, Scheduled, and Recordings, allowing you to find what you want to watch fairly quickly. The guide itself is also searchable, and you can filter it by new programs, genres or channels, much like you probably did with your cable company’s TV guide.

Some of these views, however, including Prime Time, Movies and Sports, are only available to Tablo subscribers, as are the filters on the guide itself (New, Genres, etc.). Things like the cover art used on TV shows’ thumbnails and episode details are also only for subscribers. It seems the company is not gently pushing, but rather shoving, its users to its paid tier.

FullSizeRender 2

 

Meanwhile, when selecting a channel to watch live, there’s a bit of delay. It’s just long enough to have you wondering if the channel is not coming in, or thinking you have some other technical problem.

Recording programs, though, is easy – you just tap the “REC” button next to a show. If you don’t have a subscription, you have to record programs manually. Only subscribers can schedule recordings, with the ability to set recordings by series, season, or by new episodes.

Subscribers also have access to live TV guide data for 2 weeks in advance and can watch Tablo DVR content from outside the home.

The price is $4.99 per month for this, which is less than Hulu Plus’s $7.99 per month if you’re thinking of switching.

61areU72t7L._SL1000_

Watching Anywhere 

While cable companies are still working to score content deals that allow them to bring live TV to mobile devices both inside and out of the home, the nice thing about Tablo is that you can watch TV from anywhere. You can watch from a computer or phone via a web browser, from an iOS or Android tablet, or even on the big screen via Roku, Chromecast or Apple TV (via AirPlay). And if you pay, you can watch live or scheduled shows when you’re not on your home’s Wi-Fi through the Tablo Connect feature.

The flexibility is nice, especially because, as a cord cutter, you find yourself “watching TV” from a variety of devices and locations, since you’re no longer tied to a sofa and big screen. Tablo easily fits into this lifestyle.

Who’s Tablo For?

While this is only one of several OTA DVRs on the market today, the question you may be asking is not really whether Tablo is right for you, but whether or not an OTA DVR is right for you.

Tablo’s glitches are not so bad as to not make it worth the investment (currently ~$200.00 plus the optional monthly fees) – especially if you find yourself missing the ability to record shows, or have a huge aversion to commercials.

roku_sort

That being said, the software itself is imperfect (and its Roku app is ugly!). It lags in between screens sometimes and isn’t always as responsive as you’d hope. And Tablo practically cripples its free application.

Plus, the quality of recordings – of course, this depends on signal strength and other factors – was sometimes less than ideal. The differences in the brightness and clarity of a show that came in solidly over-the-air and that same episode bought and paid for on Amazon were remarkable. Amazon’s copy was vastly better. You get what you pay for, perhaps.

tablo-free-paid

I’d say that if you’re still heavily dependent on your antenna, and find yourself watching a lot of network TV or sports, having an OTA DVR is definitely useful.

As for me, however, I’ll probably only use it for my occasional live TV needs, and maybe a handful of “special event” recordings. Most of what I’m watching is either a Netflix or Amazon-hosted series, or something I’m specifically subscribing to via a Season Pass. There are only a small handful of “currently airing” shows I need to see.

In the end, live TV, and the ability to record from it, seems like a transitional step in between cable TV’s heyday and the on-demand future of television. It’s nice to have for now, but eventually, everything will just stream.

Email me your cord-cutting story, or your Netflix recommendations: [email protected]

cord-cutter-banner1

Sours: https://techcrunch.com/2015/02/20/diary-of-a-cord-cutter-in-2015-part-3-using-an-over-the-air-dvr/

Setup assistant tablo

Tablo Streaming HDTV DVR Review: Welcome To The Next Generation Of Cord-Cutting

By Cameron Summerson

ShareTweetEmail

Since the dawn of time, humans have faced a real struggle: the relentless grip of cable companies. When it comes to TV, cable providers know they have you in a corner – all your favorite shows come on different channels, and you're going to shell out all the dollars necessary to get in on the pseudo-action. This is our spiritual war.Over the past few years, a bold, brave few have journeyed outside of the norm, metaphorically cutting the cord and leaving cable providers in the dust. Modern technology has of course aided in the process, with things like Roku, Chromecast, and Amazon's Fire TV leading the charge against high-priced monthly television packages.

Image Gallery (1 Images)

Expand

Now, a newcomer enters the arena with a way to watch and record live TV without a subscription to a traditional cable or satellite provider. We're going to take a look at one of the first boxes on the market to do this, called Tablo. Before we get into what it does, however, let's first discuss how it works.

How it does what it does

Back in the good ol' days, one could get free basic television with a set of rabbit ears or a large, ugly antenna on the roof. Since the conversion from analog to digital, all that went away, but brought with it a slew of new free TV. Free HDTV, to be exact. To pull the signal out of the sky, an HDTV Antenna is all that's needed. I'm not going to lie: I didn't even know those existed till now. What a sheltered life I live.

The main issue here, though, is that using an HDTV antenna is very basic. There is no guide. No way of knowing what's coming on next. And certainly no way of recording or watching something later. That's where Tablo comes in: it's a DVR and streaming set-top box for a connected antenna. What a cool idea.

Image Gallery (3 Images)

Expand

Expand

Expand

Last pic: I'm just using a cheap HDTV antenna from Amazon. Works well.

Here's the gist: connect an HDTV antenna, external hard drive, and internet connection (ethernet or Wi-Fi) to Tablo. It has companion apps for iOS, Android, and Roku that allow users to set up the unit for use, which includes a full channel scan and program guide. From there, it's a lot like using a standard cable-connected television.

But there's a catch. Like all companies, Tablo has to make money, thus leading to subscription packages you can buy. These subscriptions range from $5 a month to a one-time $150 fee, depending on what you want from the service. Here's a breakdown of each one:

  • Monthly guide subscription ($4.99). This is just access to the guide, which is basically a must-have if you want to use Tablo – it's pretty useless without it.
  • Yearly guide subscription ($49.99). Same as above, but billed yearly instead of monthly. Saves $10.
  • Lifetime guide subscription ($149.99). All Tablos on your account will receive guide data on a permanent basis with no recurring fees.

Five dollars is still quite a bit cheaper than traditional cable service, so that's not a terrible deal. Of course, that also depends on exactly what you want to watch. Let's talk about channels and how well the service actually works.

How well it does what it does

OK, so just to make sure you're up to speed, here's what's happening: Tablo is pulling in the HD signal from the HDTV antenna, then redistributing it over Wi-Fi to all supported devices on the network. The guide, options, and whatnot are all available through the apps, which is essentially the bulk of the Tablo experience. Recordings and such are also managed here, much like DVRs provided by most cable companies.

Now that we're all on the same page, let's take a closer look at channels, content, and how well everything works as a system. The first – and probably most important – thing to note is that available channels are going to vary drastically depending on exact location. As a general rule, small, rural towns are going to get fewer options than suburban or metropolis areas. It sucks, but that's how it is – there's nothing Tablo can do about it, because it's all about what's being broadcasted in your area. Larger, more powerful antennas are likely to pull in more channels, but it's still basically impossible to make a blanket statement regarding coverage. The absolute best thing you can do before even considering something like Tablo is take a look at what's available in your local area. Thank God for the internet, eh?

Image Gallery (2 Images)

Expand

Expand

A comparison of the small town where I used to live and where I live now: 9 vs. 73

One other note on channel availability: just because it shows up in the list doesn't mean you'll actually get it. It could potentially still be out of range – it all depends on your antenna.

The final thing that needs to be taken into consideration is streaming quality. Approximately zero channels in my area available to Tablo stream in 1080p. 1080i and 720p are the most common, with many still streaming in 480i. If you can handle some pixels then they aren't horrible, but I can't say I recommend watching anything on an HD display at less than 720p. That dramatically reduces the number of channels that are watchable.

OK! Now that we have that tidbit out of the way, let's talk about using Tablo! Since we're an Android site, I'm going to put the majority of the focus on the Android experience. That said, I'll also briefly cover what it's like on Roku and iOS for those users who may have multiple devices in their homes.

The Tablo app is pretty simple, mostly intuitive, and fairly buggy (that goes for both iOS and Android). Devices don't stay connected to Tablo constantly, so re-connection is necessary every time the app is launched. This generally only takes 1-2 seconds, so it's not an outrageous annoyance, but rather slightly inconvenient (if you can even call it that). After connection is established, the app jumps straight into the Live TV broadcast schedule (read: the guide), which is where you'll find something to watch and/or schedule recordings. The hamburger menu offers a few other methods of finding content, as well: subcategories for TV Shows, Movies, and Sports. This is also where you'll find scheduled and stored recordings, as well as settings. It's all relatively straight forward. The overall layout is identical on both Android and iOS.

Image Gallery (3 Images)

Expand

Expand

Expand

There's also a neat feature called "Tablo Connect," which allows Tablo to be accessed outside of its local network, so users can watch TV on the go. That gives people something to do while working!

So that's what the app is supposed to do. Let's talk about what it actually does: crash. Fairly often, in fact. There doesn't seem to be any rhyme nor reason to the crashes, either. Sometimes it happens while scrolling through the guide. Sometimes it's while accessing options. Sometimes it's just kind of sitting there. There's never any sort of force close dialog, either – it just disappears. It can be re-opened immediately, but it's still quite annoying.

Speaking of annoying, the app is only available on tablets. You know, because everyone has a tablet and no one ever wants to watch stuff on their phone. Even if many users would prefer the larger screen, the app has Chromecast support, so a phone is still a useful option. No need for a tablet at all. I hope the company remedies this soon.

There is also one major annoyance when streaming to Chromecast: if you go back to look at the guide, it kills the stream. So you can't look at the guide while watching something else. That drives me crazy.

Image Gallery (2 Images)

Expand

Expand

While we're talking about Chromecast support, it's also worth mentioning the Roku app. Compared to the iOS/Android apps, it's pretty basic; no guide, no recording options. You can only view what's currently on, the above mentioned categories, and content that has already been recorded. Of course, the odds are you won't be scheduling recordings from your TV, so it's still pretty functional.

Conclusion

While testing Tablo, something occurred to me: I was pulling an HD signal out of the sky, into a DVR-like box, then redistributing that signal across my Wi-Fi network, grabbing it with my tablet, and redirecting that signal back to my TV over Chromecast. All so I could watch an episode of Bewitched that was filmed in 1965. If Samantha Stevens could see this today, she'd surely be convinced that it's magic.

I wouldn't personally go that far, but I do think Tablo – or at least the idea behind it – is really cool. Unfortunately most premium programming isn't available for free (that's why it's premium), which would still make it difficult for someone who's used to watching a lot of TV to cut the cord and switch to something like Tablo.

That said, if you've already gotten rid of your cable company and stick with things like Netflix or Hulu, Tablo is an excellent way to get a little more entertainment – which includes most local channels – for not a lot more money. It's not a perfect system, and it's a little bit pricey at $200, especially when you consider that you have to bring your own HDTV antenna and hard drive. That can easily push the total cost over $300, so you'll definitely want to double- and triple-check your coverage before making the investment.

It's also worth keeping in mind that there are other companies doing the same thing now, like Simple.TV, for example. I happen to have a Simple.TV just beside my Tablo at this very moment and will be reviewing it in the very near future, so if you're interested in picking up a streaming DVR, then you may want to wait to see how the two compare.

If you just can't wait, though, hit the link below to grab your Tablo today.

Buy:Tablo

Firefox for Android's new tab page is now even more customizable than Chrome (APK Download)

Firefox 94 Beta is rolling out now

Read Next

ShareTweetEmail

About The Author
Cameron Summerson (3396 Articles Published)

Cameron is a self-made geek, Android enthusiast, horror movie fanatic, musician, and cyclist. When he's not pounding keys here at AP, you can find him spending time with his wife and kids, plucking away on the 6-string, spinning on the streets, or watching The Texas Chainsaw Massacre on repeat.

More From Cameron Summerson
Sours: https://www.androidpolice.com/2014/08/18/tablo-streaming-hdtv-dvr-review-welcome-next-generation-cord-cutting/
Unboxing and Setting up your Tablo DVR

Nuvyyo Tablo Quad review: Cord-cutting for the geek-minded

Nerdy doesn't necessarily mean bad, just that the Tablo Quad can require more tech know-how than most products. In everyday use, it does what you need from a OTA DVR: it enables you to record and watch up to four channels at once, peruse a two-week channel guide and even stream on the go. Soon, it will also be able to auto-skip commercials for you, too.

Unfortunately, you might need to become very acquainted with your router's setup page to get it to work. And Tablo works with some devices better than others. If you're a Mac/iOS fan it's all good, but PC/Xbox One users get the shortest shrift with an outdated, unusable app on one hand (Windows 10) and the inability to listen to recordings with surround sound on the other (Chrome).

For experienced nerds, the Tablo Quad is a solid choice: a flexible recorder offering excellent performance both inside the home and out. Newbies need not apply.

What is this thing?

There are two main types of digital video recorder (DVR) for cord cutters. Both connect to an OTA antenna and let you record, pause, rewind and fast-forward through TV programs broadcast for free, over the air. Traditional set-top boxes like TiVo Bolt OTA or Channel Master Stream Plus are very similar to standard cable box DVRs: tuner boxes with hard drives that connect directly to a single TV. Streaming networked DVRs like the Recast, Air TV and Tablo Quad connects to your home network rather than to a TV. This allows them to stream live TV and recordings to multiple TVs as well as to phones, tablets and PCs, both inside and outside the home.

The Tablo Quad isn't simply the Tablo Dual with two more tuners slapped into it, it's a new, wider design with several tweaks. For example, while the Tablo Dual offered  64GB of "onboard storage," the Quad doesn't come with any at all. Instead, it enables you to install your own 2.5-inch storage drive inside, up to 8TB. That's a boon to people who don't want an umbilical USB drive messing up their space (though it can utilize one of those, too).  An internal 1TB drive is about $40, so you should factor that into your cost. Alternately, an external USB drive of the same capacity runs $50.

At CES, Nuvyyo announced that the Tablo Quad will appear at the same time as a beta Commercial Skip feature (late Q1 2019). While I wasn't able to use the feature as part of this test, I will update this review once I have the chance to use the feature.

Here's the specs:

  • 802.11ac Wi-Fi and Gigabit Ethernet
  • Record up to 4,000 hours of HD content (with an 8TB drive)
  • Supported platforms: Roku, Amazon Fire TV, Android TV, Apple TV and Chromecast, smart TVs, iOS/Android, PC/Mac, Xbox One and Nvidia Shield TV
  • Tablo TV guide data costs: $5 a month, $50 a year, $150 lifetime (includes one free month)

The competition

New entrants in the past year or so have made streaming DVRs a hotly contested product category. These include the Amazon Fire TV Recast and Sling's AirTV. All of these models perform the same task as the Tablo with the main differences being the interface and the associated costs. While both of these newcomers anticipate you will sign up for the company's other services -- Amazon Prime and Sling TV, respectively -- each device's 14-day guide will work without paying extra, something that the Tablo won't do.  Of course, if you add the cost of a $99 yearly Prime membership or the $25-a-month Sling TV subscription, the costs balloon. It's worth noting the Tablo DVR will work without a subscription, but users will only get one day of data at a time and will need to manually set up recordings more than one day away.

OTA DVR cost comparison


AirTVAmazon Fire TV RecastTablo Dual LiteTablo QuadTiVo Bolt OTA
Hardware$120$230$140$200$239
Accessories ($40 HDD, $50 USB HDD, $20 antenna,$40 FireTV)$60$60$70$60$20
Lifetime subscription cost (does not include Prime or SlingTV costs)$0$0$150$150$250
Total cost$190$290$360$420$509

Setup

After turning the device on and connecting an antenna, I was able to use the iOS app to set up the Quad. Like many wireless devices, the Tablo sets up its own Wi-Fi network which you connect manually to, and then the app does the rest. Once the unit is found, the app goes through a channel search, and unlike most other DVRs, it actually removes SD channels from the list -- it is up to you to click the checkbox if you want to add these to your service.

It took a couple of reboots for my PC and Roku to find the Tablo, but once it did I was able to stream live TV within the house. The real trick came when trying to enable external streaming -- the "auto setup" failed on my Netgear router, and so I had to manually set up port forwarding rules deep within the router's menu. For techies, this will be fine, but for non-geeks the nested menus and rows of numbers within could be terrifying. It took a few tries, and a few emails to Nuvyyo, but I finally got it to work. To confirm it wasn't an isolated case I also set the recorder up at a different location on an Asus router, but the app also required me to manually enter port settings. 

I reached out to Nuvyyo to find out if there was a certified router list, and this is what the company said: "If your router supports UPNP (which most do) and it's turned on, you should not need to do any port forwarding. This is why Nuvyyo does not supply a 'certified router list'." Sadly, the Netgear router I used already had UPNP enabled, so your own mileage may vary.

Watch this: How to cut the cord for $10: installing an indoor antenna

Cutting the cord

As one of the oldest cord-cutting companies, you'd expect the Tablo experience to be one of the most intuitive and user-friendly, and once set up it does indeed perform quite well, both in terms of image quality and ease of use.

Each app's user menu offers the Live TV guide at the top and then breaks out programming according to type (Movies, Sports, etc.) with Scheduled and Recordings appearing at the bottom. You can set the page that greets you when you open the app, and for most people it would either be Live TV or Recordings.

The Live TV guide isn't the prettiest example of the Excel spreadsheet-like grid I've seen, but it's certainly functional. Some other DVRs allow you to watch Live TV while simultaneously perusing the guide, with a little preview window, and while the the Tablo doesn't let you browse the full guide it does enable a "quick guide" overlay on the current channel with the up/down buttons on the remote.

The iOS app is sensible, and recording is straightforward -- press on the show name, then press one of the Rec icons that appears. However, the app isn't especially ergonomic (for example, the familiar "back" button is a cross instead of an arrow and it is situated in the opposite corner compared to most other iOS apps).  

Moving to the Roku app and the process is a little different -- clicking on a show in the guide gives you a menu which offers the ability to Watch, Record or Go To Show (series info). 

Image quality is very good, with only a slight softness at the highest 1080/10 Mbps setting compared to standard broadcast on the same TV, but depending on your network you may need to wire the device with Ethernet to prevent stuttering in this setting. I found the picture was especially impressive when viewed on a phone remotely. With a healthy connection i didn't experience any stuttering, overt jaggies or image breakups with the default settings. Watching live TV on the bus or on a lunch break is what Tablo does best.  

It's worth pointing out that if you record in "surround sound," some platforms won't play any sound at all on those recordings, namely PCs and Xbox One. Even though the company recommends the Tablo web app on Chrome or Firefox on PCs, it doesn't play surround content -- it ends up silent. Worst of all is the Windows 10 app. It hasn't been updated since 2016, and I found that some of the button behaviors weren't working at all. For instance, I couldn't click "Connect" or play back either recordings or Live TV using the "Play"  icons. 

Should you buy it?

I liked using the Tablo Quad. It's fun, and it gets the job done -- and I was particularly pleased with the clarity when used on the go. On the flipside, it was a pain to set up and make it work with my devices, a problem I didn't have with the (cheaper) Recast. Tablo certainly has its fans among the cord-cutting community, and for the enthusiast, it offers most of the features you'd want. In addition, while I haven't reviewed the cheaper Tablo Dual Lite, it's an attractive option for users who don't need four tuners or the internal drive capability.

Meanwhile, people who don't necessarily want to get their hands dirty -- or want to pay a guide fee -- would likely be better served by the Fire TV Recast instead. 

Sours: https://www.cnet.com/reviews/nuvyyo-tablo-quad-review/

Now discussing:

He spat into the palm of his hand, saliva smeared a member and sharply thrust it into me. From the wild pain I screamed and tried to escape, but my uncle squeezed my thighs tightly. For some time he did not move, and I got used to the penis, bursting my ass to refusal.



1327 1328 1329 1330 1331