Amsco chapter 15

Amsco chapter 15 DEFAULT

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Term
Presidental Reconstruction 
Definition
Lincol beleived that the southern states never left the Union and they were just a disloyal minority. After Lincoln died Johnson tried to carry out Lincoln's plan.
Term
Proclomation of Amnesty and Reconstruction1863
Definition
Political reconstruction of state governments by Lincoln. Pardons would be granted to southerners if they took an oath of allegiance to the Union and accepted the emancipation of slaves.
Term
Definition
Bill made by republicans, made that made 50% of a state swear allegiance ot the Union for readmittance. Lincoln pocket-vetoed and casued conflict between him and republicans in congress.
Term
Definition
Acted as an early welfare agency proving food, shelter and medical aid to all people who were effected by the war. 
Term
Definition
Southern movement that restricted rights of blacks, it stopped them from borowing money to buy land, forced them to sign work apprentenships if they had no jobs and prohbited them from testifying in court against white people.
Term
Congressional Reconstruction
Definition
Three parts to it, first part was both presidents Lincoln and Johnson returing confederate states to the Union. Then a backwords movement by ex-confederates in Congress becasue of this the third round gave much harsher rules for southern whites and protected southern blacks. 
Term
Definition
Championed civil rights for blacks. Most republicans converted to this because of fear of a more powerful Democratic party. 
Term
Definition
Leading radical republican from Mass. who generally wanted equal rigths for all people.
Term
Definition
Radical Republican Leader in the House  hoped to revolutionize the south by an extended period of militarty rule.
Term
Definition
Radical republican that endorsed womens suffrage, rigths for laborr unions and civil rights for northern blacks. 
Term
Civil Rigths Act of 1866 and 14th Ammendment
Definition
All Africans were to be citizens.Passed 14th ammendment in Congress which declared all people born in the U.S inclduing slaves were citizens and made states provide equal rights for all people with equal protection and due process of law. 
Term
equal protection of the law
Definition
happend in the 1950's by the supreme court added other clasues to the 14th ammendment that dont matter right now
Term
Definition
Congress passed 3 acts that divided southern states into 5 military districts, increased the requirments for readmission and had states had to ratify the 14th ammendment. 
Term
Tenure of Office Act 1867
Definition
Enabled the President from removing a federal official or military commander unless the senate gave permission.
Term
Definition
In charge of the military governments stationed in the South. 
Term
Definition
Johnson impeached by the House for 11 high crimes, first to be impeached.
Term
Definition
Prohibited states from denying a citizens right to vote.
Term
Definition
Gave African Americans equal accomodations in public and  allowed the to serve on juries.
Term
Definition
Term
Definition
northern newcomers to congress
Term
Blanche K. Bruce and Hiram Revels
Definition
Republicans in the south sent two black senators to congress
Term
Definition
African Americans were signed up to work in the feilds. Slavery but they were contracted and payed.
Term
Definition
Republican party reformers passed on their favors and positions to their supporters.
Term
Definition
giving jobs and government favors to supporters
Term
Definition
Part of a corrupt scheme he got help from Grants brother in law to corner the gold market, was stopped but got away with a lot of money. 
Term
Definition
Insiders gave sotck inforamtion to people in Congress to avoid investigation of profits they were making.
Term
Definition
Boss of local Democratic party in New York who masterminded large schemes to get himself large chunks of graft. The Tweed Ring stole $200 million from New York taxpayers. 
Term
Definition
Cartoonist who came up with "Boss Tweed" 
Term
Definition
Overspecualtion by financers caused widespread business failures mostly casued by overbuidling of industry and railroads.
Term
Definition
Easy money system sought out by everyone, did not work because Grant sided with hard money supporters.
Term
Definition
Southern conservatives who were taking control of states governments
Term
Definition
Founded by Nathanil Beford Forrest(ForrestGump) to intimidate blacks and white reformers. 
Term
Definition
Congress gave power to federal authorities to stop the KKK with violence to protect civil rights
Term
Definition
Removed last restrictions on ex-confederats, but this caused a power switch in Congress to the democrats
Term
Definition
Republican who became president after Grant
Term
Definition
Democrat who ran agianst Hayes and lost, was expectedto win because of recent corruption of the Grant administration
Term
Definition
Infromal deal worked out between the arties that would end federal support for republicans in the south and support the building of a southern transcontinental railroad
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AMSCO AP US History Chapter 15 Flashcards

8364735435Civil Rights Act of 1866This act declared that all African Americans were U.S. citizens and also attempted to provide a shield against the operation of the Southern states' Black Codes. (p. 295)0836473543614th AmendmentRatified in 1868, this Constitutional amendment, declares that all persons born or naturalized in the United States were citizens, and it obligated the states to respect the rights of U.S. citizens and provide them with "equal protection of the laws" and "due process of law". Other parts of the amendment related to Congress' plan for Reconstruction. (p. 295)1836473543915th AmendmentRatified in 1870, this Constitutional amendment, prohibited any state from denying or abridging a citizen's right to vote "on account of race, color, or previous condition of servitude." (p. 297)28364735440Civil Rights Act of 1875The last major piece of Reconstruction legislation, this law prohibited racial discrimination in all public accommodation and transportation. It also prohibited courts from excluding African Americans from juries. However, the law was poorly enforced. (p. 297)38364735447Liberal RepublicansIn 1872, this party advocated civil service reform, an end of railroad subsidies, withdrawal of troops from the South, reduced tariffs, and free trade.48364735449Panic of 1873Economic panic caused by over speculation by financiers and over building by industry and railroads. In 1874, President Grant sided with the hard-money bankers who wanted gold backing of the money supply. He vetoed a bill calling for the release of additional greenbacks. (p. 302)58364735450greenbacksName given to paper money issued by the government, so called because the back side was printed with green ink. They were not redeemable for gold. (p 302)68364735451redeemersBy 1877, these Southern conservatives had taken control of state governments in the South. Their foundation rested on states rights, reduced taxes, reduced social programs, and white supremacy. (p. 302)78364735452Rutherford B. HayesHe won the presidential election of 1876, which was a highly contested election. He was a Republican governor from Ohio. (p. 302)88364735453Samuel J. TildenIn the presidential election of 1876, this New York reform governor was the Democrat nominee. He had gained fame for putting Boss Tweed behind bars. He collected 184 of the necessary 185 electoral votes, but was defeated by Rutherford B. Hayes, when all of the electoral votes from the contested states of South Carolina, Florida, and Louisiana went to Hayes. (p. 303)98364735454Compromise of 1877This informal deal settled the 1876 presidential election contest between Rutherford Hayes (Republican) and Samuel Tilden (Democrat). It was agreed that Hayes would become president. In return, he would remove all federal troops from the South and support the building of a Southern transcontinental railroad. (p. 303)108364735455presidential reconstructionPresident Abraham Lincoln believed that the Southern states could not leave the Union and therefore never did leave. He consider them a disloyal minority. After Lincoln's assassination, President Andrew Johnson attempted to carry out Lincoln's plan for reconstruction. (p. 292)118364735456Proclamation of Amnesty and ReconstructionIn 1863, President Lincoln's proclamation set up a process for political reconstruction, creating state governments in the South so that Unionists were in charge rather than secessionists. It include a full presidential pardon for most Confederates who took an oath of allegiance to the Union and the U.S. Constitution, and accepted the emancipation of slaves. It also reestablished state governments as soon as at least 10 percent of the voters in the state took the loyalty oath. In practice, the proclamation meant that each Southern state would need to rewrite its state constitution to eliminate existence of slavery. (p. 292)128364735457Wade-Davis BillIn 1864, this harsh Congressional Reconstruction bill stated that the president would appoint provisional governments for conquered states until a majority of voters took an oath of loyalty to the Union. It required the abolition of slavery by new state constitutions, only non-Confederates could vote for a new state constitution. President Lincoln refused to sign the bill, pocket vetoing it after Congress adjourned. (p. 292)138364735458Andrew JohnsonThe 17th President of the United States from 1865 to 1869. This Southerner from Tennessee was Lincoln's vice president, and he became president after Lincoln was assassinated. He opposed radical Republicans who passed Reconstruction Acts over his veto. The first U.S. president to be impeached, he survived the Senate removal by only one vote. (p. 297)148364735459Freedmen's BureauIn March 1865, an organization created at end of Civil War, which provided aid to the both black and whites in the South. It provided food, shelter, and medical aid for those made destitute by the Civil War. (p. 292)158364735460Black CodesSouthern state legislatures created these codes after the Civil War. They restricted the rights and movements of newly freed African Americans. 1) prohibited blacks from either renting land or borrowing money to buy land, 2) placed freemen into a form of semi bondage by forcing them, as "vagrants" and "apprentices" to sign work contracts, 3) prohibited blacks from testifying against whites in court. (p. 294)168364735461Congressional ReconstructionIn the spring of 1866, many in Congress were unhappy with President Andrew Johnson's policies and this led to the second round of reconstruction. Its creation was dominated by Congress and featured policies that were harsher on Southern whites and more protective of freed African Americans. (p. 295)178364735462Radical RepublicansIn the 1860s, this was the smaller portion of the Republican party than the moderates. They were led by Senator Charles Sumner and Congressman Thaddeus Stevens. They supported various programs that were most beneficial to the newly freed African Americans in the South. (p. 295)188364735463Charles SumnerThe leading Radical Republican in the Senate from Massechusetts. (p. 295)198364735464Thaddeus StephensThis Pennsylvania Congressman was a Radical Republican. He hoped to revolutionize Southern society through an extended period of military rule in which blacks would be free to exercise their civil rights, receive education, and receive lands confiscated from planter class. (p. 295)208364735466Reconstruction ActsIn 1867, Congress passed three acts which placed the South under military occupation. They created five military districts in the former Confederate states, each under control of the Union army. To rejoin the Union, ex-Confederate states were required to ratify the 14th amendment and place guarantees in their state constitution that all adult males of all races would be guaranteed the right to vote. (p. 296)218364735467Tenure of Office ActIn 1867, this act prohibited the president from removing a federal official or military commander, without the approval of the Senate. The purpose of the law was purely political, to protect the Radical Republicans in Johnson's cabinet from dismissal. (p. 297)228364735469impeachmentPresident Johnson was the first president impeached, for the charge of High Crimes and Misdemeanors on February 24, 1868. One of the articles of impeachment was violating the Tenure of Office Act. He had removed Edwin M. Stanton, the Secretary of War, from office. The impeachment failed, falling just one vote short. (p. 297)238364735470scalawagsThe term for White Republican Southerners who cooperated with and served in Reconstruction governments. (p. 298)248364735471carpetbaggersThe term for Northern newcomers who came to the South during Reconstruction. (p. 298)258364735473Hiram RevelsDuring the Reconstruction era, this black politician, was elected to the Mississippi senate seat that had been occupied by Jefferson Davis before the Civil War. (p. 298)268364735474sharecroppingCommon form of farming for freed slaves in the South. They received a small plot of land, seed, fertilizer, tools from the landlord who usually took half of the harvest. It evolved into a new form of servitude. (p. 300)278364735475Ku Klux KlanFounded in 1867, by ex-Confederate general, Nathaniel Bedford Forrest. This organization of white supremacists used lynchings, beatings, and threats to control the black population in the South. (p. 302)288364735476Force Acts (1870, 1871)These act passed in 1870 and 1871, gave power to federal authorities to stop Ku Klux Klan violence and to protect the civil rights of citizens in the South. (p. 302)298364735477Amnesty Act of 1872This act removed the last of the restrictions on ex-Confederates, except for the top leaders. Allowed southern conservatives to vote for Democrats to retake control of state governments. (p. 302)30
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This 11 page Reading Guide for AMSCO AP United States History is fully editable and can be completed digitally. Covers CHAPTER 15: RECONSTRUCTION (1863 - 1877). Guide students to key terms, events, and trends through these digital or printable worksheets!

Also includes 2 practice SAQs and guidelines for writing effective SAQs. Can be used to learn or review for the AP Exam. Great for distance learning or for studying independently.

CHECK OUT THE PREVIEW TO SEE THE FULL READING GUIDE

Topics include:

  • Lincoln's plan
  • Wade-Davis Bill
  • Johnson & Reconstruction
  • Black Codes
  • Freedmen's Bureau
  • Radical Republicans
  • Johnson's impeachment
  • 14th & 15th Amendment
  • Carpetbaggers & Scalawags
  • Accomplishments & failures of Reconstruction
  • Sharecropping
  • White supremacy & the KKK
  • Compromise of 1877
  • 2 AP-style SAQs for practice & to check understanding

Pairs well with the Civil War & Reconstruction PPT. For a fun in-class activity, try the Reconstruction Class Mixer!

Check out the Period 1 & 2 Bundle for chapters 1-3 Guided Reading and SAQs. & the Period 3 Bundle for chapters 4-6 & the Period 4 Bundle for chapters 7-11.

Planning for Next Year?

Check out my APUSH Comprehensive Units (independent of any particular textbook)

I also have a full year of APUSH PowerPoints (Google Slides) with almost 400 slides of engagingly-formatted content review.

For DBQ Writing, check out my DBQ Toolkit and Complexity How-To to provide guided practice for your students on each rubric point. Both are fully editable but also ready to post online for your students to complete electronically for practice and feedback.


Please let me know if you have questions. You can email me at [email protected] and I am happy to help.

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APUSH American History: Chapter 15 Review Video

Outline Chapter 15

 

 I. Lincoln's plan for Reconstruction

    A. Proclamation of Amnesty and Reconstruction

       1. if Southerners took an oath to the Union and accepted the emancipation of slaves they would be pardoned

       2. as soon as 10% of voters in a state took the loyalty oath the state gov't would be reestablished

II. Objections to Lincoln's Plan

   A.Wade-Davis Bill

      1. passed by republicans in Congress

      2. required 50% of voters to take the loyalty oath and only non-Confederates could vote for a new state constituion

      3. Lincoln vetoed this bill

   B. Freedmen's Bureau

      1. wellfare agency created by Congress to help newly freed African Americans and homeless whites

      2. Its greatest success was building schools that educated African Americans

III. Johnson's plan

   1. similar to Lincoln's 10% plan

   2. disfranchised all former leaders of the Confederates and Confederates with more than $20,000

   3. republicans were mad at Johnson

   4. Southern stae legislatures adopted Black Codes which restricted the rights and movement of African Americans and estbalished a labor contracting system that was pretty much slavery

   5. Johnson vetoed 2 bills

        -a bill increasing services offered by the Freedman's Bureau

        -a bill nulifying Black Codes

   6. Johnson campained against republicans running for Congress but they still won a majority

IV. Congressional Reconstruction

   1. republicans became more radical in an effort to remain dominant

   2. congress overrode Johnson's vetoes of Freedman's Bureau Act and the First Civil Rights Act

   3. Congress passed the 14th Ammendment- all people born or naturalized in the US have rights that must be protected

   4. and the 15th Ammendment-all citizens can vote

   5. Congress rejected the presidential plan for reconstruction in a report made by a joint commitee of the Senate

   5. Congress passed the Reconstruction Acts of 1867 which put the South under military occupation

   6.Congress passed the Tenure of office Act to portect Republicans in the cabinet

        -Andrew Johnson was impeached for violating this Act but remained in office

V. Freedmen

   1. became sharecroppers or tenents

   2. migrated to frontier states

VI. Grant's Administration

   A. Corruption

      1. spoils system- giving federal jobs to supporters

      2. Credit Mobilier-fake RR

     3. Tweed Ring stole $200 million from NY taxpayers

   B. other actions by grant

     1. fought and crushed Southern resistance like the KKK

     2. He conquered all the Western Territory

   C. Panic of 1873 was caused by overspeculation

VII. End of Reconstruction

    1. Redeemers in the South began to revive the old idea of white supremacy

    2. Congress passed the Amnesty Act of 1872 that removed the last restrictions on the Confederates

    3. election of 1876 Tilden(D) vs. Hayes(R)

        -Hayes won in an electoral commission vote of 8-7

        -Democrats were mad

   4. Compromise of 1877

       -Hayes could be the president if he removed all troops from the South so he did this

Military occupation of the South ended and the Supreme Courth struck down recosntrustion laws ending reconstruction

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Chapter 15 amsco

Chapter 15 Review Questions Name: ________________________ Period ________ Directions:​ Answer each of the following questions as completely as possible by using your own words. You should look to your textbook for guidance when answering these questions. TOP TEN 1. What were three causes of the Protestant Reformation that began in Europe in the 16th century? 2. What were the three major things the Christian Church did in an attempt to curb the progress of the Protestant Reformation? Explain each of the three in detail. 3. What were the major results of the Thirty Years’ War? 4. What was the divine right of the monarchy? In which countries did this theory seem to prevail during this period? In which countries did this theory seem to fail? 5. Compare the views on government of John Locke and Thomas Hobbes. Who would tend to support absolute government and who would tend to support a more democratic government? 6. Why was the Peace of Utrecht significant in European politics? 7. What were joint-stock companies? What role did they play in the Indian Ocean Trade? 8. List and explain the significance of at least three technological advancements that helped aid European exploration and expansion during this period. 9. What were trading post empires? How did these trading post empires attempt to control areas? How successful were these trading post empires during this period? 10. What was the Commercial Revolution? List and explain four causes of this revolution. BIG PICTURE 1. Compare the Protestant Reformation to the Schism in Christianity that occurred in 1054 C.E. and to the split that occurred in Islam in 632 C.E. 2. Discuss the similarities and differences between constitutional government and absolute government. 3. Compare a mercantilist view of the economy with Adam Smith’s view of how an economy should be structured and function.

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AP World- AMSCO Vocab- Ch. 15 Western Europe Part I

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