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ACADEMIC CATALOG 2020–2021

[DECEMBER 10,2020]


ACADEMIC CATALOG 2020–2021

The mission of the Office of Academic Affairs is to create an inclusive and innovative learning environment for design students from diverse backgrounds, inspired by an expert faculty and supported by a dedicated staff, to achieve excellence, fulfill their creative potential, and attain their professional goals.

Academic Calendar 2020–2021 Summer 2020

Fall 2020

Spring 2021

Monday, June 8 ¡  Summer 2020 session begins

Tuesday, September 8 ¡  Fall 2020 semester begins

Tuesday, January 19 ¡  Spring 2021 semester begins

Thursday, June 11 ¡  Last day to add summer courses

Monday, September 21 ¡  Last day to add fall courses

Monday, January 25 ¡  Last day to add spring courses

Thursday, June 25 ¡  Last day to drop summer courses

Monday, September 28 ¡  Yom Kippur (no classes)

Monday, February 8 ¡  Last day to drop spring courses

Wednesday, July 1 ¡  Last day for voluntary withdrawal from summer courses

Tuesday, September 29 ¡  Last day to drop fall courses

Monday, February 15 ¡  President’s Day (no classes)

Monday, October 28 ¡  Last day for voluntary withdrawal from fall courses

Monday, March 8 to Sunday, March 14 ¡  Spring recess (no classes)

Wednesday, Nov 25, 6 pm to Sunday, Nov 29 ¡  Thanksgiving recess (no evening classes on 11/25)

Monday, March 15 ¡  Last day for voluntary withdrawal from spring courses

Saturday, July 4 ¡  Independence Day Thursday, July 30 ¡  Summer 2020 sessions ends

Monday, December 21 ¡  Fall 2020 semester ends

Saturday, April 3 to Sunday, April 4 ¡  Easter weekend (no classes) Monday, May 10 ¡  Spring 2021 semester ends


Table of Contents Undergraduate Programs......................................................... 2 Basic Interior Design (BID).................................................... 2 Basic Interior Design Online (BIDD)....................................... 2 BID Curriculum.................................................................. 2 Associate in Applied Science in Interior Design (AAS).............. 3 Associate in Applied Science in Interior Design Online (AASD). 3 AAS Curriculum................................................................. 3 Bachelor of Fine Arts in Interior Design (BFA)......................... 4 Bachelor of Fine Arts in Interior Design Online* (BFAD)........... 4 BFA Curriculum................................................................. 4 Undergraduate Course Descriptions......................................... 6 Graduate Programs................................................................. 16 Master of Fine Arts in Interior Design (MFA1)......................... 16 MFA1 Curriculum.............................................................. 16 MFA1 Course Descriptions................................................. 17 Master of Fine Arts in Interior Design (MFA2)........................ 20 MFA2 Curriculum............................................................. 20 MFA2 Course Descriptions................................................ 21 MPS in Healthcare Interior Design (MPSH)............................23 MPSH Curriculum.............................................................23 MPSH Course Descriptions...............................................24 MPS in Lighting Design (MPSL).............................................25 MPS in Lighting Design Online (MPSLD)................................25 MPSL Curriculum..............................................................25 MPSL Course Descriptions............................................... 26 MPS in Sustainable Interior Environments (MPSS)................27 MPS in Sustainable Interior Environments Online (MPSSD)...27 MPSS Curriculum.............................................................27 MPSS Course Descriptions............................................... 28

Program Level Learning Objectives..........................................32 Registration............................................................................37 Immunization......................................................................37 Health Insurance.................................................................37 Placement in Mathematics & English....................................37 Transfer Credits.................................................................. 38 New Student Orientation..................................................... 38 Full-Time/Part-Time Status.................................................. 38 Advisement/Registration Schedules.................................... 38 Registration Dates.............................................................. 38 Course Additions................................................................ 38 Course Drops and Withdrawals............................................ 38 Grade Reports.................................................................... 38 Tuition and Fees..................................................................... 39 Tuition Payment Plan.......................................................... 39 Undergraduate Tuition........................................................ 39 Graduate Tuition................................................................. 39 Fees................................................................................... 39 Expenses............................................................................ 40 Student Handbook................................................................. 40 Refund Policies & Procedures.................................................. 41 Refund Schedule................................................................. 41 Student Classification By Year.............................................. 41 Faculty....................................................................................42

Course and Credit Listing....................................................... 29

* Submitted for approval by NYS, anticipated for admission in 2021

New York School of Interior Design’s Academic Catalog is published annually and is primarily intended for use by currently enrolled students, faculty, and staff. The catalog provides an overview of the College’s curriculum and academic programs. It also includes College academic policies, rules, regulations, and procedures; information about degree and certificate programs, including requirements; a listing and description of courses; and faculty information.

Program requirements and policies specified in this publication are effective as of the date of publication and supersede those published previously. The College reserves the right to change any policies or provisions contained in this publication, and to comply with any applicable law, rule, or regulation. Such changes may be made without notice, although every effort will be made to provide timely notice to students. Students are responsible for knowledge of information contained in the Academic Catalog as well as the Student Handbook. Failure to read either publication does not excuse students from the requirements of the polices and procedures of the New York School of Interior Design.

New York School of Interior Design  •  Academic Catalog 2020/2021  • 1


Undergraduate Programs Basic Interior Design Certificate (BID) Basic Interior Design Certificate Online (BIDD) MISSION STATEMENT The Basic Interior Design certificate provides an introduction to the field of interior design by emphasizing fundamental skills and knowledge in drawing, design concepts, and design history. Students build a foundation-level understanding of the technical and aesthetic principles essential to understanding space planning, color, materials, and finishes, and learn to visually and verbally communicate their creative ideas. The 24-credit Basic Interior Design Certificate (BID) and Basic Interior Design Certificate Online (BIDD) programs are the foundation of the College’s undergraduate degree programs. The curriculum and learning goals of the two programs are the same. Students gain basic knowledge of the field, and are prepared for entry-level positions in the interior design industry. All courses are taught by a select faculty of interior designers, architects, artists, and art historians. Successful completion of the BID/BIDD also enables students to continue their studies in one of NYSID’s degree programs, including the pre-professional Associates in Applied Science (AAS/AASD), the professional-level Bachelor of Fine Arts, and in the MFA-1, if other criteria are met. Admission to the Basic Interior Design program requires formal acceptance. Applicants will be considered for this program without a portfolio. Students are subject to the requirements stated in the current Academic Catalog at the time of acceptance. Of the 24 credits required for Basic Interior Design certificate, a minimum of 18 credits of professional and general education course work must be taken at NYSID. The last 12 credits prior to completion of the BID/BIDD must be taken at NYSID. The residency requirement includes 181 Design Process. All courses within the Basic Interior Design Certificate BID/BIDD programs are graded using the Letter Grade system. Refer to the current NYSID Student Handbook for Grading Descriptions and Standards. To earn the BID/BIDD certificate, a student must have a minimum cumulative/ career GPA of 2.0. Courses in the online BIDD are offered in an asynchronous, online format. Students matriculated in the onsite BID may take up to 9 credits in the online format; students matriculated in the online BIDD may take up to 9 credits in onsite courses. All 24 credits required for the BID certificate may be applied to the AAS/AASD or BFA programs upon acceptance into either of these programs. AAS/ASSD and BFA portfolio requirements can be met by submitting studio work from BID/BIDD courses. Some, but not all BID/BIDD courses are eligible for transfer into the MFA-1 degree, depending on course content and grade earned. Students who graduate with the BID/BIDD certificate are not eligible for licensure without further professional education and experience.

2  •  New York School of Interior Design  •  Academic Catalog 2020/2021

CURRICULUM (24 CREDITS) FIRST SEMESTER — 12 CREDITS 101 128 141 150 180

Historical Styles I (2)* Basic Drafting (3) Color for Interiors (2) English Composition I (3)* Visual Concepts (2)

SECOND SEMESTER — 12 CREDITS 102 119 132 134 181

Historical Styles II (2)* Textiles for Interiors (2) Construction Documents I (3) Residential Design I (3) Design Process (2)

*General Education courses


Associate in Applied Science in Interior Design (AAS) Associate in Applied Science in Interior Design Online (AASD) MISSION STATEMENT The mission of the pre-professional Associate in Applied Science in Interior Design is to prepare students to be design assistants in residential and commercial interior design offices, or in the interior design department of an architectural firm. Students master fundamental skills in drawing, hand and digital drafting, color application, history of design, materials and methods of construction, building systems, professional practice, and acquire a foundation in the liberal arts, including history, English composition, and the social/ physical sciences, along with a broad range of general education courses that include environmental science, and the principles of environment and behavior studies. Students apply their skills and knowledge in several design studio classes covering a range of design project types. The AAS curriculum partially satisfies the requirements of the qualifying examination (NCIDQ exam) required for interior design licensure in many jurisdictions. Admission to the Associate in Applied Science in Interior Design program (AAS) or Associate in Applied Science in Interior Design online program (AASD) requires submission of a portfolio and formal acceptance. The curriculum and learning goals of the AAS and AASD are the same. The portfolio may be satisfied with projects and assignments from courses in the first semester of the BID program. Course credits earned in NYSID’s BID/BIDD certificate are transferable to the AAS/AASD upon formal acceptance. The student is subject to the requirements stated in the current catalog at the time of acceptance. Students may study full-time or develop an individualized program of study on a part-time basis. The 66-credit AAS/AASD degree is composed of 44 professional and 22 general education credits, which includes design history and liberal arts requirements. There are 2 liberal arts or professional elective credits that must also be fulfilled. All courses must be taken in the proper sequence. All courses within the AAS/AASD are graded using the Letter Grade system. Refer to the current NYSID Student Handbook for Grading Descriptions and Standards. To earn the Associate in Applied Science (AAS/AASD) degree, a student must have a minimum cumulative/ career GPA of 2.0.

CURRICULUM (66 CREDITS) FIRST SEMESTER — 16 CREDITS 101 119 128 141 150 171 180

Historical Styles I (2)* Textiles for Interiors (2) Basic Drafting (3) Color for Interiors (2) English Composition I (3)* Basic Mathematics (2)* Visual Concepts (2)

SECOND SEMESTER — 17 CREDITS 102 132 134 157 160 181 187

Historical Styles II (2)* Construction Documents I (3) Residential Design I (3) Hand Drawing and Rendering I (2) English Composition II (3)* Design Process (2) Materials & Methods of Construction (2)

THIRD SEMESTER — 16 CREDITS 111 114 165 232 230 234 288

Modern Architecture and Design I (2)* Intro to Sustainability & the Built Environment (2) Environment & Behavior (2)* Presentation Techniques I (3) Codes (2) Residential Design II (3) Building Systems (2)

FOURTH SEMESTER — 17 CREDITS 112 228 236 271 283 286

Modern Architecture and Design II (2)* Professional Practice I (2) Construction Documents II (3) Environmental Science (2)* Lighting I (3) Contract Design I (3) Professional or liberal arts elective (2)*

*General Education courses

Of the 66 credits required for an AAS/AASD degree, a minimum of 33 credits must be taken at NYSID of which 30 credits must be in professional and elective design history (DH) courses. The residency requirement includes The residency requirement includes 181 Design Process, 234 Residential Design II, and 286 Contract Design I. The last 16 credits prior to receiving an AAS/AASD degree must be taken at NYSID. All 66 credits required for the AAS degree may be applied to the BFA program upon acceptance as a transfer student into that program. Courses in the AASD are offered in an asynchronous online format that may require some participation in real-time videoconference class sessions during the semester. Students matriculated in the AAS program may take up to 40% of the required courses online, or a maximum of 27 credits; students matriculated in the online AASD may take up to 27 credits in onsite courses. The AAS degree will partially satisfy some of the requirements for professional licensure as an interior designer, along with additional education, experience and examination. New York School of Interior Design  •  Academic Catalog 2020/2021  • 3


Undergraduate Programs

CONT.

Bachelor of Fine Arts in Interior Design (BFA) Bachelor of Fine Arts in Interior Design Online (BFAD)* MISSION STATEMENT The Bachelor of Fine Arts degree program at NYSID is dedicated to preparing students for full participation in the profession of interior design today and in the future. Its broad-based education in design, design history, and the liberal arts, combined with an emphasis on practical and critical thinking skills, develops students who are culturally, socially, and historically aware, and who are able to continue on a path of lifelong learning. The program’s emphasis on creativity, graphic communication skills, technical proficiency, and sustainability prepares graduates to grow with the profession and to protect the health, safety, and welfare of the public. The BFA professional curriculum satisfies the educational requirements for membership in national and local interior design associations and, with required experience, allows graduates to sit for the NCIDQ exam for interior design certification in many states. The BFA degree provides students with the knowledge and skills needed to become professional interior designers. Admission to the BFA program requires submission of a portfolio and formal acceptance. The portfolio may be comprised of samples of projects and assignments from the AAS program. Students are subject to the requirements stated in the current catalog at the time of their acceptance. Students may study full-time or work with their academic advisor to develop an individualized program of part time study. The NYSID BFA degree requires a total of 132 credits composed of 82 professional credits and 50 general education credits. The latter includes design history and liberal arts requirements and 7 free electives, which may be general education. Of the 82 professional credits, a minimum of 2 elective credits are required. All courses must be taken in the proper sequence. Course credits earned in NYSID’s Basic Interior Design or Associate in Applied Science program are transferable to the BFA upon formal acceptance. All courses within the Bachelor of Fine Arts program (BFA) are graded using the Letter Grade system. Refer to the current NYSID Student Handbook for Grading Descriptions and Standards. To earn the BFA degree, a student must have a minimum cumulative/ career GPA of 2.0. Of the 132 credits required for a BFA degree, a minimum of 66 credits must be taken at NYSID, of which 60 credits must be in professional and design history (DH) courses. The courses that are in both the BID program and the BFA may be taken in an asynchronous, online format and will satisfy some of the requirements for the BFA. The residency requirement includes 181 Design Process, 328 Professional Practice II, 334 Residential Design III, 386 Contract Design II, 418 Thesis Preparation, 476 Contract Design III, and 487 Thesis. The last 26 credits prior to receiving a BFA degree must be taken at NYSID.

* As of July 2020, New York State Office of the Professions and NYSED have approved an online delivery format for all BFA courses. Awaiting approval by NASAD and notification to MSCHE.

CURRICULUM (132 CREDITS) FIRST SEMESTER — 16 CREDITS 101 119 128 141 150 171 180

Historical Styles I (2)* Textiles for Interiors (2) Basic Drafting (3) Color for Interiors (2) English Composition I (3)* Basic Mathematics (2)* Visual Concepts (2)

SECOND SEMESTER — 17 CREDITS 102 Historical Styles II (2)* 132 Construction Documents I (3) 134 Residential Design I (3) 157 Hand Drawing and Rendering I (2) 160 English Composition II (3)* 181 Design Process (2) 187 Materials & Methods of Construction (2)

THIRD SEMESTER — 16 CREDITS 111 Modern Architecture and Design I (2)* 114 Intro to Sustainability & the Built Environment (2) 165 Environment & Behavior (2)* 232 Presentation Techniques I (3) 230 Codes (2) 234 Residential Design II (3) 288 Building Systems (2)

FOURTH SEMESTER — 17 CREDITS 112 228 236 271 283 286

Modern Architecture & Design II (2)* Professional Practice I (2) Construction Documents II (3) Environmental Science (2)* Lighting I (3) Contract Design I (3) Professional or liberal arts elective (2)*

FIFTH SEMESTER — 17 CREDITS 175 People, Place, and Culture (2)* 292 Presentation Techniques II (3) 334 Residential Design III (4) 340 Architectural Woodwork Detailing (3) 355 Design Theory (2)* 383 Lighting II (3)

SIXTH SEMESTER — 16 CREDITS 201 203 392 386

Art & Society I: Pre-19th Century (3)* Humanities I (3)* Presentation Techniques III (3) Contract Design II (3) Professional elective (2) Professional or liberal arts elective (2)*

SEVENTH SEMESTER — 16 CREDITS 202 204 231 418 476

Art & Society II: 19th & 20th Centuries (3)* Humanities II (3)* Kitchen & Bath Design (3) Thesis Preparation (2) Contract Design III (3) Design history elective (2)*

EIGHTH SEMESTER — 17 CREDITS 328 Professional Practice II (2) 442 Furniture Design (3) 487 Thesis (4) 306 Intensive French (3) or 308 Intensive Italian (3)* Design history elective (2)* Professional or liberal arts elective (3)* *General Education courses

4  •  New York School of Interior Design  •  Academic Catalog 2020/2021


New York School of Interior Design  •  Academic Catalog 2020/2021  • 5


Undergraduate Course Descriptions NOTE: Courses denoted with DH satisfy Design History elective requirements

011 Pre-College Art & Design Intensive I: Color No credits, No prerequisites

Color is one of the most exciting aspects of both art and design. For one week, you’ll dive into color: how colors interact, amplify, and play with each other. You’ll complete a small interior design project inspired by color. Can you imagine a room inspired by van Gogh’s “Starry Night?” After choosing a favorite work of art, students will create an interior that captures its color palette, imagery, and sense of space.

012 Pre-College Art & Design Intensive II: Line, Shape, and Form No credits, No prerequisites

What are the basic elements of art? How are these the foundation for design? Develop the skills to create and develop the elements of art, from line, to shape, to form. Understand how to apply what you’ve learned to a small design project.

013 Pre-College Art & Design Intensive III: Pattern No credits, No prerequisites

What does a fabric pattern have to do with space? Students will explore the designs and patterns used in a three-dimensional space and will develop in 2D, such as a textile pattern that incorporates the fundamental principles of design. Students will develop a concept or story behind the design they will develop.

040 Pre-College I Studio Credits: 1, No prerequisites

This interactive two-week course is designed to immerse you in the creative and rewarding world of interior design. Open to high school sophomores, juniors, and seniors interested in learning more about the profession, the course will introduce you to interior design and help you explore career possibilities. You will attend lectures by designers, demonstrations of architectural drawings, and workshops on color and materials. Taught by a team of faculty, the course takes full advantage of NYSID’s prime location in the nation’s design capital, including field trips to contract and residential firms, and notable showrooms. The mentored studio component will enable you to explore interior design in a relaxed atmosphere and complete a small residential design project that can be added to your portfolio. This course is available on a Pass/Fail basis only. Students who successfully complete this course can apply one elective academic credit to a degree program at NYSID.

041 Pre-College II Studio Credits: 1, No prerequisites

Take your basic interior design knowledge to the next level by exploring chic retail and hospitality spaces in the heart of the nation’s design capital. This two-week course will introduce the principles of “branding” and its integration into the interior

design process. Students will get to experience the design of a small café and/or hotel lobby, with emphasis on developing additional skills to express ideas graphically and verbally. Field trips to stylish retail spaces and picturesque hotel lobbies will be complemented by guest speakers to help students further their understanding of a complex interior space. This course is available on a Pass/Fail basis only. Students who successfully complete this course can apply one elective academic credit to a degree program at NYSID.

112 Modern Architecture and Design II

101 Historical Styles I

Lecture Credits: 2, No prerequisites

Lecture Credits: 2, No prerequisites

This course is an introductory overview of design in furniture, interiors and architecture from the ancient world through 1820. Students will be introduced to the development of major forms, furniture styles and ornament from ancient Egypt, Greece and Rome through the Renaissance, Baroque, Rococo and Neoclassical eras. The onsite section of the course uses a blended format of online lectures combined with group discussions and field trips to major collections. The online section combines video lectures with fully online discussions; students will be required to independently visit cultural sites and museums within their geographical region. DH

102 Historical Styles II Lecture Credits: 2, Prerequisites: 101

The second half of the introductory survey, this course focuses on the history of Western furniture, interiors, and architecture in the 19th and 20th centuries considered within the cultural context of each period. Styles examined include 19th century revival styles, Arts and Crafts, Art Deco, European and American Modernism, the International Style and Postmodernism. The onsite section of the course uses a blended format of online lectures combined with group discussions and field trips to major collections. The online section combines video lectures with fully online discussions; students will be required to independently visit cultural sites and museums within their geographical region. DH

111 Modern Architecture and Design I

Lecture Credits: 2, Prerequisites: 102 AND 160

The second part of the overview of modern architecture, this course focuses on the period 1890 to the present in Europe and America. Styles and movements covered include the American Beaux Arts, the Chicago School, Art Nouveau, Vienna Secession, Futurism, Expressionism, Art Moderne, the Modern Movement, and Post-Modernism. DH

114 Introduction to Sustainability and the Built Environment This survey course introduces students to the principles and concepts of sustainability and provides the context for design decisions for the 21st century. Students will develop an understanding of why current and future makers of the built environment must think differently than in the past and the reasons for both historical and current concerns about resource limitations. Class lectures will explore differing interpretations of the concept of sustainability and the broad range of factors contributing to a sustainable society, including, health, productivity, biomimicry, passive design strategy, material re-use and resource conservation. Guest lecturers will include experts in the field of sustainable softgoods, hardgoods, lighting, daylighting, environmental systems, LEED, and BIM.

117 Pattern Design for Printed Fabric and Wallpaper Lecture Credits: 1, No prerequisites

This course is an introduction to pattern design for both printed fabrics and wallpaper. The class will begin by exploring the past by investigating design types through the ages. Students will visit the Design + Decoration, which will give them a broad look at current trends in printed fabric and wallpaper. They will select inspiration and develop their ideas through the design process to arrive at their own original designs. A variety of printing techniques and the technical parameters will be discussed along with substrate materials.

118 Custom Carpets

Lecture Credits: 2, Prerequisites: 102 AND 160

Lecture Credits: 1, No prerequisites

The sources of modern architecture and design are explored are explored from the 18th century designers Adam, Soane, and Ledoux through the 19th century and the work of the eclectic architects. The course examines how architects used stylistic elements of the past and adapted them to solve modern design problems. Each revival style is traced to the original era to explore the meaning of the adaptations. Through research and analysis, student develop awareness of historical precedents as the historical basis of modern designs and analyze the key formal and decorative attributes of the built environment. DH

Students will learn how to develop custom carpets in this course. They begin by looking at both historical and contemporary carpets. A variety of rug weaving methods, from simple flat rugs to pile carpets will be explored including both hand-knotted as well as machine made techniques. Students will gain experience in finding inspiration and developing it into a finished design. Finally, they will visit carpet and rug sources to learn how to best work with them to create and color custom carpets.

6  •  New York School of Interior Design  •  Academic Catalog 2020/2021


119 Textiles for Interiors

138 Presentation Technique w/PowerPoint

148 Introduction to Adobe Illustrator

Lecture Credits: 2, No prerequisites

Studio Credits: 1, No prerequisites

Studio Credits: 1, No prerequisites

This course is a survey of the history and science of fabrics through lectures on major decorative arts periods as well as textile design, fibers, methods of weaving, dyeing, flammability, finishes and trims. Properties, code requirements, and maintenance of contract and residential fabrics and their application are covered as well as estimating yardage. Also included in the course are lectures on the history of wallpaper and carpeting and their application to today’s interiors.

PowerPoint business presentation graphics software integrates text, graphics, audio, and animation. Students will learn to insert images, attach sound, and animate a multipage presentation.

Adobe Illustrator is a vector-based image creation program used in illustrations, technical drawings, animations, special effects, logo design, and motion graphics. Topics covered in class include Bezier curves, the pen tool, color and gradients, type vs. rasterized type, gradient mesh tool, live trace, and integration with other Adobe Creative Cloud programs.

128 Basic Drafting Studio Credits: 3, No prerequisites

Using both hand and computer-aided drawing methods, students are introduced to the tools, techniques, and principles of architectural drafting, graphic conventions, and lettering. Students will measure actual sites and study the use of dimensional orthographic and three-dimensional paraline drawing types.

132 Construction Documents I Studio Credits: 3, Prerequisites: 128 or 640

Students are introduced to the preparation of construction documents and beginning level CAD skills using AutoCAD. While learning to develop the plans, elevations, sections and details that will form part of a set of working drawings for a small commercial or residential interior project, students gain an overview of construction drawing formats and principles.

134 Residential Design I Studio Credits: 3, Prerequisites: 101, 128 , 141, 180

Through studio projects, lectures, and discussions, this course provides an introduction to the design of the residential environment. By focusing on the design of a traditional, transitional, and contemporary room, students learn the principles of proper furniture arrangement, and how to select fabrics, finishes, and accessories. Exercises in room design and character are supplemented by sessions assessing client needs, developing a written concept and program, learning residential design resources, and preparing a professional design presentation.

136 Revit Workshop Level I

139 Introduction to Adobe Photoshop Studio Credits: 1, No prerequisites

Adobe Photoshop is an image-editing, photo retouching, and composition program used by design professionals across all disciplines. This course will introduce fundamental tools and techniques including selections, layers, basic image retouching, masks, filters, paths and integration with other Adobe Creative Suite programs.

140 Introduction to Web Page Design Studio Credits: 1, No prerequisites

Interior designers increasingly use the Internet to market their firms and services. This course will introduce students to the basics of creating a web page. Lectures and demonstrations will cover issues of layout and media, and launching a site. Each student will create their own web page.

141 Color for Interiors Studio Credits: 2, No prerequisites

This studio course concentrates on the study of color and color schemes for interiors. Compilation of the Munsell Color Charts is the basis for a series of projects which lead to the development of complete color schemes. Psychological and practical influences affecting the choice of color are studied. Using gouache paints, colors for walls, floor coverings, window treatments, upholstery, accessories, and accent areas are selected and applied to a variety of room settings.

142 SketchUp Studio Credits: 1, No prerequisites

This course provides students with the ability to explore and express design ideas in three dimensions using SketchUp, a quick, easy-to-learn 3D image modeling program that is compatible with AutoCAD. Students will learn how to enhance their drawings with shadow, light, textures, and other advanced digital rendering techniques.

Studio Credits: 1, Prerequisites: 132 or 640

145 Introduction to Adobe InDesign

This course builds on Autodesk Revit knowledge and concepts gained in Construction Documents in which students were introduced to Revit/ BIM as it is used in architectural drafting and design. Students will increase their skills in creating a virtual architectural model and using Revit in design presentations.

Studio Credits: 1, No prerequisites

150 English Composition I Lecture Credits: 3, Prerequisites: NYSID Placement Test

This course focuses on the development of collegelevel writing skills. Discussions and coursework include reading assignments, idea development, and sentence structure. By using short essays on current design and other relevant topics as models, students learn to write grammatically correct prose.

151 English Composition I / ESL Lecture Credits: 3, Prerequisites: NYSID Placement Test

This English writing course has the same focus as course 150 while being specifically designed to meet the special needs and concerns of students whose native language is not English. This course is highly recommended for students in all degree programs with TOEFL scores from 79–85.

157 Hand Drawing and Rendering I Studio Credits: 2, No prerequisites

In this course, sketching and rendering skills will be developed as tools for design and graphic communication. Students will draw freehand from observation, in situ, and master quick perspective sketching techniques, using various media.

159 Introduction to Virtual Reality Lecture Credits: 1, No prerequisites

This course introduces the basic concepts and technologies of Virtual Reality (VR). It is intended for students who are new to VR and want to understand its capabilities as a design tool, focusing on different ways to move around and interact with objects in a virtual world. Students will be introduced to creating 3D panoramic environments for immersive communication.

160 English Composition II Lecture Credits: 3, Prerequisites: 150 or 151 or 640 or NYSID Placement Test

Adobe InDesign is the design industry’s standard layout program. This course will introduce fundamental tools and techniques including basic layout, text and graphics manipulation, drawing tools (Bezier curves), color creation and application, master pages, multiple pages and integration with other Adobe Creative Cloud programs.

Students continue to develop their writing skills and learn how to write convincing, well-planned research papers. Students become familiar with the library resources needed to do research and learn how to focus on a topic, organize material, write a compelling description, and compare and contrast two objects or ideas.

New York School of Interior Design  •  Academic Catalog 22020/2021• 7


Undergraduate Course Descriptions

CONT.

165 Environment and Behavior

171 Basic Mathematics

Lecture Credits: 2, Prerequisites: 150 or 151 or 517 or 640 or by permission of Office of Academic Affairs

Lecture Credits: 2, Prerequisites: NYSID Placement Test

This introduction to environment and behavior studies explores individual and social human interaction with the physical environment. It examines perception and cognition, cultural differences in space use, proxemics, placemaking, territoriality, the role of values in the design of the environment, wayfinding and other aspects of environment-behavior studies.

166 Art and Antique Appraising I Lecture Credits: 2, Prerequisites: 102 or 502

This course provides an overview for designers of how the quality and value of fine and decorative arts are determined within the context of the marketplace. Students learn to recognize and research silver, ceramics, glass, prints, furnishings, and other collectibles as they focus on the typical contents of a residence. Field trips may include visits to an auction house, antiques shop, or museum.

167 Art and Antique Appraising II Lecture Credits: 2, Prerequisites: 166 or 502

Participants are given an opportunity to appraise typical contents of a residence including special consideration of insurance and estate evaluation. Problems of equitable distribution of personal property when the appraiser is called upon to analyze furnishings for liquidation is also discussed. Other topics include the valuation of donated fine and decorative art to a tax-exempt institution in accordance with Internal Revenue Service (IRS) guidelines and the valuation of architectural or attached art found in landmark buildings, such as stained-glass windows and stonework.

168 Economics of Taste and Style Lecture Credits: 2, No prerequisites

What drives the market in the fine and decorative arts to appear capricious and unstable financially and stylistically? This course examines international, political, and environmental influences on trends in interior design, architecture and the world of art as we experience it from day to day. Examples of dynamic changes in fashion emanating from West to East and from past to present will be used.

169 The Art of Chinese Calligraphy Studio Credits: 1, No prerequisites

Calligraphy expresses the beauty of language artistically and visually. This short course introduces the art of Chinese calligraphy by learning basic strokes of characters and by practicing the five traditional scripts of calligraphy. Students will learn the meaning and structure of specific characters used in calligraphic writing through lectures, demonstrations, and practice.

Fundamental concepts of mathematics are introduced through a review of basic arithmetic, algebra, geometry, and trigonometry. Emphasis is on topics with particular application to design, such as patterns, perspective, ratio, and proportion, imperial and metric measurement, and the Golden Mean.

175 People, Place, and Culture Lecture Credits: 2, Prerequisites: 150 or 151 or 640

The global diversity of social organization is explored through ethnology, the anthropological study of socioeconomic systems, and cultural heritage. Students will explore cultural aspects such as gender, labor, exchange, and religion though readings and discussions, and examine detailed views of various cultural aspects within a whole culture that ultimately bind a society together.

178 Design as a Second Language Lecture Credits: 3, No prerequisites

This immersive ESL conversation workshop uses New York City as an exciting “living laboratory’ for international design students and designers to learn the specialized vocabulary used in design studios and design history courses. Every class session focuses on ease in public speaking. Co-taught by a designer and an ESL instructor, students are introduced to the language of design through guided tours of New York City streets and visits to cutting edge and architecturally significant design destinations, such as Grand Central Terminal, the Metropolitan Museum of Art and the Museum of Modern Art, and the Seagram building.

180 Visual Concepts Studio Credits: 2, No prerequisites

Students are introduced to the language common to all visual activity. Through freehand drawing exercises and study models, the abstract elements of design - point, line, plane, shape, form, value, color and texture - are examined, along with the principles which unify these elements in a clear, visual and conceptual organization. Discussion and critique of assigned projects enable students to develop an understanding of the elements and principles of design composition.

181 Design Process Studio Credits: 2, Prerequisites: 101 AND 128 AND 180

This course is an exploration of formal design principles and their application to the built environment. Students gain an understanding of geometric order and the articulation of enclosures as defined by base, vertical, and overhead planes, and become familiar with process of designing interior space, including concept development, programming, diagramming, and schematic planning.

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184 Visual Experience and Expression in New York City Studio Credits: 3, No prerequisites

For the visual person, New York City is a vibrant, living design laboratory. Students in this class are introduced to the language and principles of art and design, through site visits, freehand drawing, model-making, and other exercises in visual communication. Students will acquire a basic understanding of the principles of design and composition, and will be exposed to the use of a broad range of graphic media. Note: students earning a grade of C or better will be exempt from the MFA-1 Qualifying Workshop and are eligible to matriculate into the MFA-1 with the portfolio requirement waived.

185 21st Century Design in New York City Lecture Credits: 3, No prerequisites

In this course, students will use New York City as an extended classroom to explore the most innovative recent projects from all sectors of interior design and architecture, including hospitality, retail, office, and residential design. Faculty-led field trips will offer students first-hand experience of conceptually and programmatically challenging design projects.

187 Materials and Methods of Construction Lecture Credits: 2, Prerequisites: 128 AND 171 or 640

Through observation and analysis, students will develop an understanding of the importance of interior construction methods, materials, finishes, and details. Students become familiar with the application of a wide variety of building materials through lectures, presentations, site visits, and the preparation of construction details.

189 Decorative Painting I: Faux Finishes and Gilding Studio Credits: 1, No prerequisites

An introduction to the techniques and history of decorative painting with an emphasis on faux finishes, glazes, and gilding. Students will produce sample presentation boards while exploring the creative possibilities of decorative painting as it relates to classical and contemporary interiors.

190 Decorative Painting II Stencils and Pattern Studio Credits: 1, No prerequisites

A further exploration of the techniques and history of decorative painting with an emphasis on painted pattern and stenciling for interior embellishment. Students will develop hand-painted project boards based on historical or contemporary designs.


191 Drawing in Situ: New York

199 Study Abroad Program

205 Antique Furniture and Accessories

Studio Credits: 1, No prerequisites

Lecture Credits: 2, Prerequisites: 101 or 501 or 640

Lecture Credits: 2, Prerequisites: 102 or 502 or 640

This peripatetic drawing course will take place in New York City, including some Outer-Borough locations. Students will meet once before the sessions for an orientation and introduction to Plein Air, or on-site, sketching of buildings. The group will spend each session at one location, inside or outside depending on weather. There will be an emphasis on historic New York and how each site fits into its cultural and historic context. Students will be required to prepare a folio of drawings to present to the instructor for comment and grade at the end of the course.

This two-week study tour will visit significant sites, examining both historical and contemporary interior design, architecture, and art. Emphasis is on historical and stylistic analysis within a cultural context. Students will do preparatory readings, and keep a journal/sketchbook; a final research paper is required. Locations have included London, Paris, and Rome, as well as Scandinavia and China. (NOTE: This course does not satisfy 506 or 606 Experiential Learning.) DH

194 Systems of Geometric Proportion

Illustrated lectures and first-hand observation will provide students with an understanding of how period styles have been interpreted in the decorative arts and have evolved from the Renaissance through the beginning of the 19th century. Course material focuses on objects in ceramic, metal, and glass; lamps and lighting fixtures; and furniture, and will demonstrate the importance of these objects in reflecting the forms and ornaments of each particular style. All students meet with the instructor for the first session at NYSID; the remaining classes are held at The Metropolitan Museum of Art. DH

In French, trompe l’oeil means “to fool the eye.” Throughout history, artists have conquered the third dimension, from Michelangelo’s Sistine Chapel to the masters of deception of the 21st century. In this studio class, students will paint portions of historical architectural elements using highlights and drop shadows to mimic reality.

Studio Credits: 1, No prerequisites

This course provides geometric methods for composing harmonious spaces and places. Lectures and studio workshops include: practical techniques for design applications, step-by-step elementary and intermediate drawings for producing proportional compositions with a compass and rule; commentaries on geometric symbols; useful mathematical theorems and definitions; analysis of harmonious proportions in world-famous art, architecture, interior and landscape design including works by Andrea Palladio, Thomas Jefferson, Eero Saarinen, Beatrix Farrand, and Louis Sullivan.

195 Decorative Painting III Murals and Graphics Studio Credits: 1, No prerequisites

An exploration of the history and techniques of decorative painting as it relates to large-scale murals and graphics for contemporary interior embellishment. Students will develop their ideas on canvas, scaling and transferring their designs while learning the basic methods of mural painting.

196 Decorative Painting IV Decorative Objects Studio Credits: 1, No prerequisites

The focus of this course is painted finishes for decorative objects. Centuries of craftsmanship in the decorative arts will be explored in the course including the preparation of surfaces and the basic tools, techniques, and methods used in creating the painted finish. Students will apply this knowledge to create samples of tortoise shell, bamboo, malachite, and patina for leaf.

197 The Golden Mean as a Design Tool Studio Credits: 1, No prerequisites

The Golden Mean stands alone among mathematical expressions of proportion. Its appearance in nature, design, and architecture is universally recognized, from Egyptian pyramids and the Greek Parthenon to Le Corbusier, and from sunflowers to spiral shells from the sea. The Golden Mean principle is explored in lectures, and practical studio workshops teach students how to draw the Golden Mean proportion and use it as a design tool.

200 Decorative Painting: V Trompe L’Oeil Studio Credits: 1, No prerequisites

201 Art and Society I: Pre-19th Century Lecture Credits: 3, Prerequisites: 160 or 640

This course examines the development of painting and sculpture beginning from the fall of Rome through the masters Bernini, Rembrandt, Vermeer, and Velasquez, to the rise of Neo-classicism and Romanticism. Characteristics of artistic styles and the changing role of the artist are viewed in a social and historical context.

202 Art and Society II: 19th and 20th Centuries Lecture Credits: 3, Prerequisites: 160 or 640

This course ranges from Realism, Impressionism, and Post-Impressionism to the frontiers of abstraction. The effect of political movements on early 19th century art is examined, as well as the profound impact of the technological revolution at the turn of the century on early 20th-century art movements such as Cubism.

206 Introduction to Environmental Graphic Design Lecture Credits: 2, Prerequisites: 286 or 608 or 640

Environmental graphic design includes the design and planning of exhibit and interpretive design, wayfinding and signage programs for buildings and interiors, visual communication of corporate identity and branding, information design, and signage for entertainment, retail, and institutional settings. Through lectures, field trips, and short-term graphic exercises, this course will give students a thorough understanding of the intersection of interior design and graphic design.

207 Applied Ethics Lecture Credits: 1, No prerequisites

Acting ethically is a foundation of professional design practice. In this course, students will examine from a moral standpoint important issues in design, and will discuss the morally correct course of action using common dilemmas in design practice as topics. Topics may include theft of services, intellectual property and ownership of designs, and how the “good” may be embodied in the idea of what is beautiful.

208 Furnishings and Interiors in America 1700–1900

203 Humanities I

Lecture Credits: 2, Prerequisites: 102 or 502 or 640

Lecture Credits: 3, Prerequisites: 160 or 640

This course examines the origins of design in America in the 18th century, tracing its development from a dominant English aesthetic to the beginnings, after 1776, of an individual national style. It will address the social and cultural context of objects and interiors as well as their visual characteristics. Objects will be examined in terms of craftsmanship and quality of manufacture. The course will address issues of materials and form as well as concepts of revival, reproduction, and restoration. All students meet with instructor for the first session at NYSID; the remaining classes are held at The Metropolitan Museum of Art. DH

This course explores the development of Western culture from the Ice Age through the Late Middle Ages by examining philosophy, religion, aesthetic theory, economics, and politics and their ideological, chronological, and technical implications. Students will read texts from leading literary and philosophical works to gain insight into the ancient world.

204 Humanities II Lecture Credits: 3, Prerequisites: 160 or 640

The continuation of Humanities I, this course explores the development of Western culture from the Early Renaissance through the present day by examining philosophy, religion, aesthetic theory, economics, and politics and their ideological, chronological, and technical implications. Students will read texts from leading literary and philosophical works to gain insight into the modern world.

New York School of Interior Design  •  Academic Catalog 2020/2021  • 9


Undergraduate Course Descriptions

CONT.

211 Introduction to the Theory and History of Design Lecture Credits: 2, Prerequisites: 101 AND 150 or 151 This course introduces students to ideas and approaches to the study of design history and theories with particular emphasis on the interior environment. Through a combination of in-class lectures, discussions, guest speakers, and numerous site visits and tours, students learn about the wide-ranging nature of the field. Students explore different ways of reading the built environment through firsthand observation and the use of historical documents. Emphasis is placed on methodology, terminology, and understanding of broad historical frameworks. DH

225 17th and 18th Century Interiors

231 Kitchen and Bath Design

Lecture Credits: 2, Prerequisites: 102 or 640 or 502

Studio Credits: 3, Prerequisites: 236 AND 171

This course focuses on French and English design. Furniture styles from shops founded in the reign of Louis XIV and 18th century products of rare quality and detail still influence design style today. A focus on two centers - London and Paris - helps students gain insight into fashionable design of the period and its enduring influence in the 19th and 20th centuries. All students meet with the instructor for the first session at NYSID; remaining classes are held at The Metropolitan Museum of Art. DH

Kitchens and baths are often the most highlydesigned areas in an interior. This course provides an in-depth introduction to the planning and design of kitchens and baths with a focus on residential applications. Design projects emphasize issues of safety, accessibility, modularity, and manufactured products including metric-based items, appliances, materials, and industry standards.

226 18th and 19th Century Ceramics

This course is an introduction to cutting edge visual presentation techniques for interior design. Using digital drawing software, such as SketchUp, students will learn to create, view, and manipulate three-dimensional digital interior models. Post-production editing of rendered images is explored through Photoshop.

215 The Beaux Arts Tradition in America

Lecture Credits: 2, Prerequisites: 102 or 640 or 502

Lecture Credits: 2, Prerequisites: 112 or 602 or 640

Through a series of lectures and walking tours, this course examines how Beaux Arts architects created both public and private environments in America. Lectures focus on the golden era of American domestic design pioneered by Richard Morris Hunt in the 1870s and ‘80s, developed in the interiors of Stanford White and Elsie de Wolfe, and showcased in American mansions like Vizcaya and Beauport. Students will visit both private and public interiors and explore a variety of Beaux Arts building types, including the row house and the department store. DH

Exploring the broad range of ceramics produced during this period, from hand-formed pots to exquisite tableware and serving pieces, this course will introduce students to the history of porcelain from its origins in China to its discovery in Europe in the early 18th century. It will provide an introduction to the nature of different types of ceramic, how they were formed and decorated, and how they varied according to the material, the country of origin, and the particular style of the time. All students meet with instructor for the first session at NYSID; the remaining classes are held at The Metropolitan Museum of Art. DH

216 20th Century Design

228 Professional Practice I

Lecture Credits: 2, Prerequisites: 111 or 112 or 640 or 601 or 602

This course will examine the major design movements of the 20th century and the designers and architects who shaped the development of the contemporary modern aesthetic. Beginning with Art Nouveau and the Arts and Crafts movement, it will examine such critical influences as the Wiener Werkstatte, the Bauhaus, Midcentury Modernism, Postmodernism, Minimalism, and the global design of the recent avant-garde.DH

217 Psychology of Well-Being Lecture Credits: 1, No prerequisites

Students will examine current trends and research in the fields of psychology and education that focus on the what, why, and how of living a meaningful, happy and productive life within the context of both society and one’s own feelings, behaviors, and priorities. Through discussion, readings, and personal reflection, the course will explore research-supported topics such as, achieving happiness, errors in thinking, optimal work experience, resilience, motivation, social media, mindfulness, and meditation.

222 Arts of China and Japan Lecture Credits: 2, Prerequisites: 102 or 502 or 640 This seminar broadly examines the arts, design, and culture of China and Japan from ancient times to the present, in terms of medium, form, style, historical context, and iconography as well as religious, cultural, and social functions. Topics include ceramics, sculpture, painting and calligraphy, furniture, interiors, architecture, and garden design. The interrelationships between East and West, and ancient and modern design will be addressed in depth. Illustrated lectures will be supplemented by museum and gallery visits. DH

Lecture Credits: 2, Prerequisites: 150 AND 234 AND 171

The course introduces students to the business practices important to entry level designers. Students are introduced to the role and responsibilities of a design assistant, with special emphasis on ethical considerations. Topics include developing and maintaining a design resource library, interacting with vendors and contractors, researching the design market, preparing purchase orders and specifications, and developing a budget. Discussions will also address assisting in developing design schemes, preparing for client presentations, and tracking orders through installation.

230 Codes Lecture Credits: 2, Prerequisites: 134 AND 171 or 640

An introduction to building codes and legal regulations as they relate to interior design work is presented. Discussions cover building codes, the process of code development and revision, and the responsibilities of interior designers in incorporating code requirements in their work. Essential sections of the building code, such as egress, occupancy levels, regulations for the handicapped, general accessibility requirements, finish and material specifications, and fire ratings, are included.

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232 Presentation Techniques I Studio Credits: 3, Prerequisites: 157 AND 132 or 640

234 Residential Design II Studio Credits: 3, Prerequisites: 119 AND 134 AND 182 or 119 AND 134 AND 181

Building on the skills and knowledge acquired in Residential Design I, this studio focuses on the design of a complete residence, from a studio apartment/loft to a freestanding house. Emphasis is placed on design process, programming, space planning, universal and accessible design, building codes and presentation techniques.

236 Construction Documents II Studio Credits: 3, Prerequisites: 187 AND 132 or 640

Building upon the skills and concepts learned in Construction Documents I, students will use Autodesk Revit to create a set of integrated construction documents. Simulating a team context, each student will use Revit to create a set of construction documents for a commercial renovation project. Key concepts of 3ds Max Design will also be introduced.

238 Portfolio Development Studio Credits: 1, Prerequisites: 234 or 608 or 640

This course provides an introduction to various formats and processes used in creating a portfolio. Methods and examples of organization and layout are covered.

239 Photoshop II Studio Credits: 1, Prerequisites: 139

This studio course will expand on the skills taught in 139 Intro to Photoshop to address the imaging needs specific to interior designers. Students will work on renderings and other imaging elements from their studio projects, and learn to use the Photoshop toolbox to enhance their images. Digital post production techniques and strategies specifically used for architectural photographs will also be taught, including advanced compositing.


243 H  istory of the Interior Design Profession in America Lecture Credits: 2, Prerequisites: 101 AND 102 or 501 AND 502

This seminar traces the history of interior design practice in the United States from its roots in the decorative arts, architecture, and home economics. The course begins with the founding of the profession in the Gilded Age, moves through the 20th century, and focuses closely on the profession of today and tomorrow. 20th-century topics include the evolution of design education, the role of mass media, the drive toward efficiency and safety in workplaces and homes, and changing norms around gender, sexuality, and social class in the field. Contemporary topics include aspects of professionalization such as evidence-based design, universal design, and wellness/healthcare design, as well as legislation, licensure, and accreditation. DH

244 Basics of Photography Lecture Credits: 2, No prerequisites

This course will cover the basic technical skills necessary to take photographs with either a digital or film camera. Equipment demonstrations, hands-on shooting assignments and class critiques will focus on getting students comfortable with using the manual controls on a camera, and unraveling the mysteries of the digital point-nshoot. Such topics as exposure controls, ISO, selective focus, composition and basic digital post production will be covered. This course is relevant to beginners and students with some experience in photography, and is designed to build a groundwork of skills for more advanced pursuits in photography.

245 Photography for Interior Designers Lecture Credits: 2, No prerequisites

This course is an introduction to the history, language, and techniques of architectural and interior photography. Students will acquire a basic knowledge of photographic vocabulary, learn how to evaluate photographic images, and become familiar with traditional and digital photographic equipment and techniques. Discussions and assignments will also explore composition, styling, and lighting.

247 Rendering with Markers Studio Credits: 2, Prerequisites: 141 AND 157 or 541 or 640

This course explores dry and wet marker techniques to delineate forms, textures, and finishes employed in the presentation of design projects.

255 Architectural Photography Workshop Studio Credits: 2, No prerequisites

In this intensive workshop, students will travel as a group to visit local iconic buildings and interiors, in order to explore and experiment with photography in a rich architectural setting. The workshop will culminate in a show of class work at NYSID.

260 Systems of Ornamental Design

270 Topics in World Literature

Studio Credits: 2, Prerequisites: 102 AND 181 or 102 AND 182 or 502 or 640

Lecture Credits: 3, Prerequisites: 160 or 640

This studio course explores the major Western and non-Western styles of ornament that have been employed in architectural interiors. Through a series of lectures, demonstrations, and exercises, students will learn how to apply ornament to a variety of interior spaces using the rules of composition. Styles such as Classical, Gothic, Romanesque, and Modern as well as Asian and Native American will be covered.

262 Advanced Trade Techniques I: Custom Upholstery Lecture Credits: 1, Prerequisites: 134 AND 187 or 640 or 538 AND 587

Students will develop a detailed understanding of the custom elements of a residential or commercial interior, including knowledge of materials, manufacturing techniques, and installation methods. The focus of this course is custom upholstered furniture, decorative pillows, window treatments and hardware.

This course satisfies the advanced writing requirement for students who have met the English Composition I requirement through placement testing (required for B.A.). Changing topics may include contemporary American literature, Shakespeare, literature of the Enlightenment, Romanticism, or significant non-Western works.

271 Environmental Science Lecture Credits: 2, Prerequisites: 160 or 640 or 517

Designers need to understand issues such as the disruption of basic ecosystems by human intervention; the destruction of rainforests and its implication for future systems, resource depletion, energy use, and sustainability. These topics, as well as demography, overpopulation and hunger; atmospheric and climatic change due to global warming and depletion of the ozone layer; the impact of urbanization on agriculture, and how public and governmental decisions shape environmental policies will be studied.

275 The Dwelling from a Global Perspective

263 Advanced Trade Techniques II: Custom Flooring

Lecture Credits: 2, Prerequisites: 112 or 640 or 602

Lecture Credits: 1, Prerequisites: 134 AND 187 or 640 or 538 AND 587

Students will develop a detailed understanding of the custom elements of a residential or commercial interior, including knowledge of materials, manufacturing techniques, and installation methods. The focus of this course is custom hard and soft flooring, including parquet wood floors, custom carpeting, and detailed use of ceramic, glass, stone, concrete, and aggregate materials such as terrazzo on floors and walls.

This course concentrates on the history of shelter outside the Western mainstream. Students will have the opportunity to study typical examples from prehistoric times through the present, including residences found in Asia, Africa, and the Americas, establishing the evolution of shelter to permanent dwellings. Lectures will focus on specific geographic areas, their houses, and interiors, as well as the cultural forces that determine their form. DH

276 The Dwelling in the West: A Survey of Vernacular Traditions Lecture Credits: 2, Prerequisites: 112 or 640 or 602

264 Advanced Trade Techniques III: Custom Wall Treatments Lecture Credits: 1, Prerequisites: 134 AND 187 or 640 or 538 AND 587

Students will develop a detailed understanding of the custom elements of a residential or commercial interior, including knowledge of materials, manufacturing techniques, and installation methods. The focus of this course is specialized wall and ceiling treatments, including custom painting techniques, papers, mirror, and specialty finishes on plaster, drywall, and wood.

265 Advanced Trade Techniques IV: Custom Cabinetry Lecture Credits: 1, Prerequisites: 134 AND 187 or 640 or 538 AND 587

Students will develop a detailed understanding of the custom elements of a residential or commercial interior, including knowledge of materials, manufacturing techniques, and installation methods. This advanced course focuses on the fabrication of custom cabinetry, traditional architectural moldings and doors, and sourcing custom and specialty hardware.

Students will consider the evolution of the vernacular dwellings in North America and Europe beginning with the Renaissance. Lectures will cover a broad range of urban and suburban forms, from the town house to the apartment building, as well as farm dwellings, rural cottages, and tract houses. Class discussions will explore the importance of industrialization, mass production and the role played by commercial developers and the media. DH

282 Advanced Design Process Studio Credits: 2, Prerequisites: 181 or 182 or 527

Building on the analytical skills gained in earlier courses, students explore the elements and principles of design in visits to significant sites of New York City and environs. Class time will be spent in lectures, discussion, and freehand drawing based on observation, including quick sketching and analytic diagrams.

New York School of Interior Design  •  Academic Catalog 2020/2021  • 11


Undergraduate Course Descriptions

CONT.

283 Lighting I

289 Structural Concepts

299 Domestic Study Trip

Studio Credits: 3, Prerequisites: 132 AND 171 or 640 or NYSID Math Placement Exam AND 132

Lecture Credits: 2, Prerequisites: 171 AND 182 AND 187 or 171 AND 181 AND 187

Lecture Credits: 2, Prerequisites: 102 or 502

Students are introduced to basic technical and creative concepts in lighting interior spaces, with emphasis on the architectural aspects of lighting design. Human factors, floor planning, color, materials, and the behavior of light are discussed, along with lamps, fixtures, layout, and circuiting. Students work on studio projects and develop interior lighting plans and specifications. Through research and analysis students will develop an understanding of the relationship of light to the various elements of the built environment and its role in protecting the health, safety, and welfare of the end-user.

Since structure and structural expression are among the most important elements contributing to the character, form, and meaning of interiors from furniture to architectural elements, it follows that interior designers need basic understanding of structural concepts. This lecture course examines the principles and techniques of post and beam, bearing wall, arch, vault, dome, and truss design in wood, concrete, masonry, and steel construction. Cutting edge materials and systems such as structural glass, ceramics, plastics, and tensile structures are also addressed.

286 Contract Design I

Credits: 1, No prerequisites

Studio Credits: 3, Prerequisites: 230 AND 234 AND 288

While providing an overview of contract design, this course emphasizes the elements used by the designer in the development of nonresidential interior spaces such as restaurants and offices. Conceptual and practical issues are explored relative to site selection, programming, space planning, circulation, volume, furnishings, color, and texture in the design of interior space.

287 History of American Building Materials and Technology Lecture Credits: 2, Prerequisites: 111 and 187 or 601 and 587 or 640

This course surveys the evolution of materials and techniques used in the production of American interiors, including architectural detailing and decorative elements, from colonial times to the present. Each major building technology is explored using a historical perspective, from its pre-American roots to its further development in America. Students acquire a comprehensive knowledge of interior construction terminologies, historical methods of interior construction, and a detailed understanding of interior construction and finish materials that have been used. DH

288 Building Systems Lecture Credits: 2, Prerequisites: 187 or 640

A study of the materials and methods of plumbing, HVAC, fire protection, lighting, and electrical systems in relation to interior architecture and design. Through research and analysis, students become aware of the impact of materials, construction methods, and building systems on the built environment and develop an understanding of the relationships between codes, sustainability, culture, and human-environment interaction.

291 Introduction to Professional Experience This course allows undergraduate students to gain practical training as design assistants or entry-level interns working in a professional design office. This experience must be directly applicable to the study of interior design. Students must have completed 24 credits at the New York School of Interior Design to enroll in this course. Students are required to keep a journal each day of work, recording their observations, reflections on the work environment, and on their experiences. Students must provide a letter of invitation from the prospective employer/ firm to their academic advisor. The employer letter must state the following: number of work hours per week (maximum 20 hours/week), schedule, salary, if any, the responsibilities and expectations for the position, and other required information. The employer must also sign a NYSID Employer Agreement before employment commences. Fall and Spring internships must fall within the dates of the semester. Summer dates are determined at time of approval by the academic advisor, and the International student advisor, if applicable. International students are also required to submit a request form to the international student advisor and receive an updated I-20 before they are permitted to begin employment. Beginning employment before or without receipt of an updated I-20 is illegal and has serious repercussions.

292

Presentation Techniques II

This study tour will visit significant sites within the United States, examining both historical and contemporary interior design, architecture, and art. Emphasis is on historical and stylistic analysis within a cultural context. Students will do preparatory readings, and keep a journal/ sketchbook; a final research paper is required. Past trips have included the study of modernism in Southern California and art deco in South Beach. DH

306 Intensive French Credits: 3, No prerequisites

Intensive French begins with basic vocabulary and grammar and continues through more advanced communication skills. Conversations use professional design terminology and references, enabling students to become familiar with significant developments in French art, architecture, and design. No prior knowledge of French is required.

308 Intensive Italian Credits: 3, No prerequisites

Intensive Italian begins with basic vocabulary and grammar and continues through more advanced communication skills. Conversations use professional design terminology and references, enabling students to become familiar with significant developments in Italian art, architecture and design. No prior knowledge of Italian is required.

309 Contemporary Topics in Hospitality Design Lecture Credits: 2, No prerequisites

Over the last 10 years, hospitality design has been the creative vanguard of New York City design. In this course, students will explore the interdisciplinary contributions of interior designers, architects, industrial, and graphic designer to city restaurants, cafes, and hotels. Students will visit important New York City destinations such as The Plaza and Ace hotels, Chelsea Market, and the restaurants of the Museum of Modern Art. Students will keep a sketchbook and design journal, and complete a small hospitality project. The course fee covers museum admissions and special tours.

Studio Credits: 3, Prerequisites: 232 or 640

315 History of Building Types

Building on 232 Presentation Techniques I, students learn advanced techniques for rendering interior finishes, furniture, window treatments, and accessories, using SketchUp and its rendering application V-Ray, and will create a simple threedimensional walkthrough of an interior space and learn to use basic video editing software. The laser cutter is also introduced.

Lecture Credits: 2, Prerequisites: 111 AND 112 or 601 AND 602 or 640

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This seminar will investigate the development of one or more building types and their interiors. Semester topics may focus on libraries, clubs, museums, hotels, or government buildings. Significant examples and stylistic trends will be investigated through visits to sites, class lectures and discussion, as well as student presentations. DH


316 Great Women Designers

325 Landscape Design in History

334 Residential Design III

Lecture Credits: 2, Prerequisites: 111 AND 112 or 640 or 601 AND 602

Lecture Credits: 2, Prerequisites: 111 AND 112 or 640 or 601 AND 602

Studio Credits: 4, Prerequisites: 111 AND 234 AND 283 AND 286 or 112 AND 234 AND 283 AND 286

This course explores the significant contributions of women to the fields of architecture and design. Important contemporary and historical figures such as Edith Wharton, Elsie de Wolfe, Eileen Gray, Julia Morgan, Andrée Putman, Gae Aulenti, and Denise Scott Brown will be discussed. DH

This history seminar explores the concepts, principles and methods of landscape design in a historical perspective with special focus on the relationships between landscape and interior and exterior architecture. The shape and meaning of gardens in each society will be examined, as well as analyzing what is revealed about the philosophical and spiritual concepts of nature in specific cultures and eras. DH

This final studio in the residential design sequence focuses on a residential interior project of greater complexity and diversity. Emphasis is placed on the development of a comprehensive solution using innovative and appropriate conceptual approaches and the demonstration of proficiency in residential design. The goals of this course include refining the ability of students to express themselves both graphically and verbally, and developing proficiency in handling three-dimensional space using suitable materials and technology.

317 Topics in Non-Western Art and Design Lecture Credits: 2, Prerequisites: 111 AND 112 or 640 or 601 AND 602

Students will be introduced to some of the significant traditions of art, architecture, and design in the non-Western world and their influence on Western architecture and design. The course provides students with an understanding of the historical background of each culture, major building forms, types of furnishings and interiors, and distinctive forms of ornament. Changing topics may include Middle Eastern, Indian, Chinese, Japanese, Korean, and Mayan, design. DH

326 History of Urban Form

318 Design History Seminar

327 Landscape Design Seminar

Lecture Credits: 2, Prerequisites: 111 AND 112 or 640 or 601 AND 602

Lecture Credits: 2, Prerequisites: 111 AND 112 or 602

This seminar is an in-depth study of a special topic related to the history of design and decorative arts. The course is structured around a set of lectures, class discussions, core readings and field trips. Students are required to develop a creative project or write a research paper related to the seminar topic. DH

323 China: Design and Decorative Arts Lecture Credits: 2, No prerequisites

This course examines major developments in the design and decorative arts of China from ancient times to the present. It investigates architectural and interior designs, symbols and meanings in the arts of jade carving, bronze vessels, ceramics, furniture and costumes, which are discussed in relation to the history of painting, calligraphy, sculpture and environment. Students will analyze designs and objects in terms of medium, form, and style in their historical context. Iconographical interpretation will be conducted in relation to religious, cultural, social and political functions. The course will provide students with in-depth knowledge and understanding of the significance of design and decorative arts in Chinese arts and culture. Illustrated lectures will be supplemented by museum and gallery visits, and a “Chinese Symbols and Designs” workshop. Students may elect to take this course Pass/Fail, and must notify the Registrar of their, choice in writing, at the time of registration. DH

Lecture Credits: 2, Prerequisites: 111 AND 112 or 601 AND 602

This course surveys urban form from its origins in the ancient world to present-day urbanism, and analyzes the concept of the “ideal city.” Architecture, public space, city planning, and public works are considered in relation to the social, political, economic, and religious context of urban environments. DH

Through a broad survey and close study of gardens and landscapes from around the world, students will explore the philosophical and spiritual relationship between nature and culture, as expressed in the design of these special places.

328 Professional Practice II Lecture Credits: 2, Prerequisites: 228 AND 160 AND 386 or 640

This advanced professional practice course focuses on the business, legal, financial, and managerial considerations of interior design practice. A case study is used to explain the formation of a design business, and its structure and operations; designer/client and designer/ vendor relationships; contract formats for residential and commercial projects; various forms of compensation; project management including programming, budgeting, scheduling, bidding, contract administration, and post-occupancy evaluations; government and statutory rules and regulations; insurance and dispute resolution. Students are also introduced to the issue of legal recognition of the profession and licensing.

332 Advanced Graphic Communications I Studio Credits: 3, Prerequisites: 292 or 640

Advanced Graphic Communications I introduces students to a variety of 3D modeling software for visual communication and representation. Students learn digital modeling (Solid, Surface Mesh, NURBS), rendering, and master the creation of photo-realistic renderings using lighting and material assignments. Techniques for producing a 3D model from photographs are also introduced.

335 Master Class: Residential Design Studio Credits: 1, Prerequisites: 334 or 618

A Master Class offers outstanding students with a minimum GPA of 3.5 the opportunity to study in a small group with a leading residential interior designer. Students are assigned a small-scale but challenging residential design project under the guidance of a master designer. In a special class format, students listen and observe as the expert works with each student individually, focusing on detailed design, offering guidance, and noting areas of excellence and those in which improvement is needed. The course will culminate in a formal presentation.

338 Set Design Seminar Lecture Credits: 2, Prerequisites: 286 or 506

This lecture course is an overview of the concepts, principles, and techniques of designing stage sets. Through lectures, discussion, and a small design project, students will learn how set designers creatively explore the intersection of spatial design, theatrical lighting, furnishings, and finishes, to interpret and dramatically express a concept.

339 Advanced Color Studio Credits: 2, Prerequisites: 141 or 541 or 640

This advanced course will focus on applied color, by exploring 2D and 3D color relationships and systems, utilizing 2D painting, collage, and 3D model-making. It will focus on building concepts useful in other design studios, as well as exploring innate color palettes and style language. Through lectures and color manipulation exercises, students will explore traditional and avant-garde color theories; how light, different media, and the physical environment affect color; and the influence of culture and society on personal and emotional systems of color.

340 Architectural Woodwork Detailing Studio Credits: 3, Prerequisites: 187 AND 286 or 640

Wood detailing is explored as applied to architectural interiors. The focus of projects is the development of design and drawing skills related to built-in cabinets, moldings, staircases, and other specialties.

New York School of Interior Design  •  Academic Catalog 2020/2021  • 13


Undergraduate Course Descriptions

CONT.

344 Exhibition Design

366 Conceptual Sketching II

385 3ds Max II

Lecture Credits: 2, Prerequisites: 171 AND 286 or 602 AND 608

Studio Credits: 1, Prerequisites: 365 or 640 or 538 or 526

Studio Credits: 1, Prerequisites: 384

This course begins with the consideration of the exhibition script, proceeds to exhibition concepts, and follows with examples of solutions. The technical and style differences of museum and gallery, trade show and showroom will be analyzed in depth.

Students will advance their individual drawing skills and styles developed during Conceptual Sketching I by focusing on integrating object and spatial sketching, both at NYSID and at selected sites. Elaboration using advanced student projects and integration with digital techniques will be explored.

355 Design Theory

368 Watercolor Rendering Techniques

Lecture Credits: 2, Prerequisites: 102 AND 160

Studio Credits: 1, No prerequisites

386 Contract Design II

This seminar is an in-depth analysis of the relationship between theory, practice, and socio-historical considerations in architecture and interior design. Beginning with a discussion of the various approaches to and functions of “theory,” both traditional and critical, the course focuses on a close reading of major primary texts by design theorists from Claude Perrault to Le Corbusier. These theories and the built works they inform will be analyzed in their appropriate historical and critical contexts. Through lecture and discussion of assigned readings, the course will stress the importance of theory for the achievement of a socially appropriate and responsible design. DH

For centuries watercolor was the medium of choice in capturing the essence of a design, and creating luminous architectural and interior design renderings. In this course, students will learn the fundamentals of watercolor rendering, and the effects of various brushes, papers, and paints.

Studio Credits: 3, Prerequisites: 334

357 Retail Design Lecture Credits: 2, Prerequisites: 286 or 640 or 608

This course introduces students to the factors important in the successful design of stores and boutiques in urban, suburban, and shopping mall settings. Students learn about space utilization, fixtures, and display as well as the role the interior designer plays in branding and the selling of a product.

358 Health Care Facilities Lecture Credits: 2, Prerequisites: 286 or 640 or 608

Through lectures, field trips, and short-term graphic exercises, this course presents an overview of the special issues related to the design and construction of long and short-term health care facilities.

364 Mixed Media Rendering Studio Credits: 2, Prerequisites: 141 AND 210 or 141 AND 212 or 141 AND 157 or 640 or 527

Students produce renderings and drawings with various media to further develop their individual style in this studio course. Light, material, and surface representations are analyzed on objects, furniture, and spaces.

365 Conceptual Sketching I Studio Credits: 1, No prerequisites

This advanced freehand drawing course focuses on developing the use of sketching as a design development and communication tool. Using drawings made through observation, students will learn how to refine and develop an idea primarily by means of quick three-dimensional sketching.

369 Revit for Interior Designers Studio Credits: 1

This course covers the basics of Autodesk Revit, a 3d modeling and visualization program. Students will explore the concept of building information modeling (BIM) through the creation of parametric models of interior spaces and learn how these models may be manipulated for design investigations, rendered perspective views, and the preparation of construction documents.

370 Historic Preservation Lecture Credits: 2, Prerequisites: 102 or 502 or 640 Note: 370 is not a design history elective.

This course will introduce students to the special issues facing interior designers when working within historic buildings. Through readings, lectures, class discussions, guided tours and site visits, students will expand their knowledge, and learn about the theories and methods used to research, preserve and adapt historic buildings and their interiors and furnishings.

383 Lighting II Studio Credits: 3, Prerequisites: 283 or 640

The goal of this course is to expand upon the skills and vocabulary of lighting knowledge gained in Lighting I by applying them to solve design problems in architectural lighting projects. Course lectures familiarize the student with lighting design strategies, graphics, circuiting techniques, creation of specification booklets, basic dimming systems as well as specialty topics such as decorative luminaires and energy efficiency. The influence of lighting on color and related psychological effects are explored.

384 3ds Max I Studio Credits: 1, Prerequisites: 292 or 636 or 640

This 3ds Max course will introduce students to the fundamentals of working with 3ds max. Included skills will cover basic modeling and editing workflows. Exercises will focus on spline and polygon modeling as well as essential concepts such as working with snaps, coordinate systems, sub-object editing and using modifiers. Learning outcomes will be geared towards being able to model basic spaces and objects.

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This advanced 3ds Max course will explore more in depth modeling workflows. Included skills will cover the creation of more detailed geometry, organic forms, and more advanced editing tools. There will be a brief look at some of 3ds Max’s animation and simulation tools. Learning outcomes will be geared toward modeling proficiency and basic rendering skills.

Building on the skills and information gained in Contract Design I, students design projects such as showrooms, corporate offices, or retail environments, and are introduced to principles of “branding” and its integration into the design of an interior. Practical issues such as compliance with building codes, sustainability, and use of modular furniture systems are addressed in relation to both high-rise building design and historic contexts.

387 Master Class: Contract Design Studio Credits: 1, Prerequisites: 386 or 628

A Master Class offers outstanding students with a minimum GPA of 3.5 the opportunity to study in a small group with a leading contract or commercial interior designer. Students are assigned a small-scale but challenging contract design project under the guidance of a master designer. In a special class format, students listen and observe as the expert works with each student individually, focusing on detailed design, offering guidance, and noting areas of excellence and those in which improvement is needed. The course will culminate in a formal presentation.

388 Advanced Materials & Methods of Decoration Studio Credits: 2, Prerequisites: 228 AND 187 AND 234 or 608 or 640

Students will develop a detailed understanding of how to develop and specify custom elements of a residential or commercial interior, including knowledge of the materials, manufacturing techniques, and installation methods of hard and soft flooring, painting, wallcoverings, tile and stone, upholstered furniture, and custom window treatments

392 Presentation Techniques III Studio Credits: 3, Prerequisites: 292 or 639

Advanced presentation techniques are explored using various 3D modeling and workflow methods from AutoCAD and 3DS Max. Students learn digital modeling (Solid, Surface Mesh, NURBS), rendering, and presentation techniques, and master the creation of photo-realistic renderings using lighting and material assignments, creating compelling presentation images. Techniques for producing an advanced 2D/3D animation of an interior space are introduced.


399 Architectural Photography in the Urban Landscape Credits: 1, No prerequisites

Over four days, students will intensively explore and photograph the urban landscape of a city or town. The group will visit iconic architectural sites, viewing architecture, interiors, and the urban environment through the lens of the visual artist. Students will meet once before and once after the trip to plan and then present their work. The course may be taken Pass/Fail, but all students will be required to prepare a portfolio of their photographs from the trip to present to the instructor for comments and a grade.

418 Thesis Preparation Studio Credits: 2, Prerequisites: 160 AND 386, Co-requisite: 476

This course lays the foundation for the thesis project to be executed in the following semester. In consultation with the faculty, students will select an appropriate project type, determine the site to be used, prepare existing condition drawings, gather and analyze relevant environment-behavior research, and write a project statement and program.

432 Advanced Graphic Communications II Studio Credits: 2, Prerequisites: 332 or 392 or 640

This advanced studio requires students to integrate their digital and hand drawing and rendering skills through the completion of a series of projects exploring qualities of light, materials and perspective views, creating compelling and realistic images. Adobe Photoshop is also explored as a support tool in the development of these images. In addition, students learn how to translate AutoCAD 3D models to 3D Studio and to create complex three-dimensional models which otherwise would be impossible to create in AutoCAD.

487 Thesis Studio Credits: 4, Prerequisites: 392 AND 417 AND 476 or 392 AND 418 AND 476

The thesis is the culminating interior design studio project of the BFA degree program. Students implement the project identified and researched in the Thesis Preparation course. Students must present their work to a jury of professionals, and all projects are exhibited in a thesis exhibition.

490 Advanced Internship Studio Credits: 3, Prerequisites: 228

This course offers elective academic credit for college-monitored work experience, and is open to students matriculated in the BFA or BA degree program who have accumulated 90 credits or more and have a cumulative GPA of 3.0. It is designed to build on skills already learned in the classroom and to acquire new ones. Students have the opportunity to integrate theory and practice and to gain professional experience. An internship for 3 credits consists of 240 hours of contact time at the job placement site. An internship for 2 credits consists of 160 hours of contact time at the job placement site. Grading is Pass/Fail only.

500 Advanced Independent Study Studio Credits: 3, Prerequisites: Approval of the VP of Academic Affairs

This course option allows the advanced student with a 3.5 GPA or better to create an individual program of study with a faculty member. Students are required to present an outline of their intended study to the dean for approval prior to registration and must present their final project to a faculty jury. This study course may be taken for elective credit only.

442 Furniture Design Studio Credits: 3, Prerequisites: 340

This design studio focuses on the aesthetic and functional issues related to the creation of custom, freestanding furniture. The uses of both hard and soft goods are covered. Special attention is given to anthropometric and ergonomic considerations, sustainability, and the use of the metric system in the design of a furniture piece.

476 Contract Design III Studio Credits: 3, Prerequisites: 386

Student research, develop, and analyze data and design criteria for a substantial project involving diverse populations. This advanced studio requires students to incorporate the skills and knowledge gained throughout their studies to create a comprehensive project, including presentation drawings, models, materials and furniture boards, detail drawings and specifications.

New York School of Interior Design  •  Academic Catalog 2020/2021  • 15


Graduate Programs Master of Fine Arts in Interior Design (MFA1)

CURRICULUM (90 CREDITS + 6 OPTIONAL) FIRST SEMESTER — 14 CREDITS

MISSION STATEMENT The Master of Fine Arts in Interior Design (MFA1) is a three-year, full-time, 90-credit professional degree program dedicated to providing students from diverse backgrounds with a graduate professional-level interior design education, and prepares them to be leaders in interior design practice and education. The program’s comprehensive curriculum emphasizes research and analysis applied to a diverse range of user groups, taking into account global practice, sustainable design, and social and cultural awareness. Graduates will be prepared to lead the discipline into the future, to broaden the understanding of how interior design can serve the greater world community, and to provide creative design solutions at the highest level. The MFA1 program provides students who possess a baccalaureate degree in an unrelated field (of which 30 credits must have been in the liberal arts) with an advanced degree containing the professional-level education to be leaders in interior design practice and education. The MFA1’s comprehensive curriculum emphasizes the role of global practice, sustainable design, and other areas of social and cultural concern. In combination with the required professional experience, the curriculum satisfies the educational requirements for membership in national and local interior design associations and allows graduates to sit for the NCIDQ exam for interior design certification in many jurisdictions. Admission to the MFA1 program requires formal acceptance and submission of a portfolio demonstrating the applicant’s creative abilities in the fine or applied arts or, for those with no portfolio, the successful completion of the NYSID MFA Workshop prior to matriculation. This 90-credit MFA degree requires full-time study and is composed of 80 professional, technical, and design history credits and 10 required elective credits, offering both seminar and studio courses in art and design history, graphic communication, technical skills and knowledge, professional practice, and interior design studios. If they wish, students may take up to 6 additional free-elective credits over the course of their program during the fall and spring semesters as part of the flat tuition.

501 Historical Styles I (2) 514 Introduction to Sustainability & the Built Environment (2) 517 Design & Drawing I (2) 528 Interior Design Studio I (4) 541 Color for Interiors (2) 564 Environment and Behavior (2)

SECOND SEMESTER — 14 CREDITS 502 Historical Styles II (2) 519 Textiles for Interiors (2) 527 Design & Drawing II (2) 530 Codes (2) 538 Interior Design Studio II (4) 587 Materials & Methods of Construction (2)

SUMMER SESSION ONE — 3 CREDITS 506 Experiential Learning I (3)

THIRD SEMESTER — 15 CREDITS 601 Modern Architecture & Design I (2) 608 Interior Design Studio III (4) 617 Building Systems (2) 633 Lighting I (3) 636 Construction Documents (3) Electives (1)

FOURTH SEMESTER — 15 CREDITS 602 Modern Architecture & Design II (2) 618 Interior Design Studio IV (4) 631 Kitchen & Bath Design (3) 639 Advanced Graphic Communications (3) 641 Interior Design Practice (2) Electives (1)

SUMMER SESSION TWO — 3 CREDITS 606 Experiential Learning II (3)

FIFTH SEMESTER — 14 CREDITS + 3 OPTIONAL FREE ELECTIVES

Of the 90 credits required for the MFA1 degree, a minimum of 60 credits must be taken at NYSID, all of which must be in required professional courses. Only 500-level courses may be satisfied by transfer credit, including transfer credits applied from certain co-numbered courses taken at NYSID’s undergraduate level.

628 Interior Design Studio V (4) 634 Advanced Detailing (2) 642 MFA-1 Thesis Prep (2) 643 Lighting II (3) Electives (3) + (3)

The residency requirement includes all 600-level courses, 506 Experiential Learning I, 514 Introduction to Sustainability in the Built Environment, 564 Environment & Behavior, 606 Experiential Learning II, 608 Interior Design Studio III, 618 Interior Design Studio IV, 628 Interior Design Studio V, 642 MFA1 Thesis Preparation, and 648 MFA1 Thesis Studio. All courses within the Master of Fine Arts program (MFA1) are graded using the Letter Grade system. Refer to the current NYSID Student Handbook for Grading Descriptions and Standards. To earn the MFA1 degree, a student must have a minimum cumulative/ career GPA of 3.0.

SIXTH SEMESTER — 12 CREDITS

Students must attend full-time during each semester (12 credits minimum). Students must enroll in the 3-credit 506 Experiential Learning I/ 606 Experiential Learning II courses in the designated summer. In satisfying the required number of elective credits, students may, with the approval of their academic advisor, choose to take elective credits in semesters other than those listed.

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635 Theory of the Built Environment (2) 644 Furniture Design (3) 648 MFA-1 Thesis (4) Electives (3) + (3)


MFA1 Course Descriptions 098 MFA-1 Workshop

506 Experiential Learning I

This non-credit workshop is required for all prospective students accepted into the MFA-1 program without a portfolio that graphically demonstrates their technical and creative abilities in the fine or applied arts. Students are introduced to the language and principles of art and design through museum visits, freehand drawing, model making, and other exercises in visual communication. Participants will acquire a basic understanding of the principles of design and composition and will be exposed to the use of various graphic media and the basics of model-building. Students must pass this workshop to continue into the MFA.

Lecture Credits: 3, Prerequisites: 538

501 Historical Styles I Lecture Credits: 2, No prerequisites

This course is an introductory overview of design in furniture, interiors and architecture from the ancient world through 1820. Students will be introduced to the development of major forms, furniture styles and ornament from ancient Egypt, Greece and Rome through the Renaissance, Baroque, Rococo and Neoclassical eras. The onsite section of the course uses a blended format of online lectures combined with group discussions and field trips to major collections. The online section combines video lectures with fully online discussions; students will be required to independently visit cultural sites and museums within their geographical region.

502 Historical Styles II Lecture Credits: 2, Prerequisites: 501 or 640

The second half of the introductory survey, this course focuses on the history of Western furniture, interiors, and architecture in the 19th and 20th centuries considered within the cultural context of each period. Styles examined include 19th century revival styles, Arts and Crafts, Art Deco, European and American Modernism, the International Style and Postmodernism. The onsite section of the course uses a blended format of online lectures combined with group discussions and field trips to major collections. The online section combines video lectures with fully online discussions; students will be required to independently visit cultural sites and museums within their geographical region.

526 Hand Drawing and Rendering Techniques

This required course provides MFA-1 students a unique opportunity to extend their interior design education beyond the classroom through planning, implementing, and assessing a learning experience of their choice. In consultation with their instructor, students will select one of three options: mentorguided internship, independent study, or the graphic communications workshop. In addition to design-related independent study, this option also includes study travel or community service/service learning. Students must submit a detailed proposal for review and approval by the instructor prior to the start of the summer session. Students are required to do readings, actively participate in a weekly discussion board, and submit a final reflective essay, along with other option-specific deliverables.

514 Introduction to Sustainability & the Built Environment Lecture Credits: 2, No prerequisites

This survey course introduces students to the principles and concepts of sustainability and provides the context for design decisions for the 21st century. Students will develop an understanding of why current and future makers of the built environment must think differently than in the past and the reasons for both historical and current concerns about resource limitations. Class lectures will explore differing interpretations of the concept of sustainability and the broad range of factors contributing to a sustainable society, including, health, productivity, biomimicry, passive design strategy, material re-use and resource conservation. Guest lecturers will include experts in the field of sustainable softgoods, hardgoods, lighting, daylighting, environmental systems, LEED, and BIM.

Studio Credits: 2, No prerequisites

In this course, sketching and rendering skills will be developed as tools for design and graphic communication. Students will draw freehand from observation, in situ, and master quick perspective sketching techniques, using pencil, ink, watercolor, and other media. This course is highly recommended for students with limited hand drawing skills.

527 Design and Drawing II Studio Credits: 2, Prerequisites: 517

Building on the skills acquired in Design and Drawing I, assignments will reinforce and extend students’ knowledge of and facility with hand and computer-based drawing. Along with hand-rendering techniques, graphic design software such as Adobe Illustrator and InDesign, and rendering software such as VRay for SketchUp, will be used throughout the process of designing a small-scale project, from concept generation through final design presentation.

528 Interior Design Studio I Studio Credits: 4, No prerequisites

Students are introduced to the abstract language and principles common to all visual activity. Discussion and critique of assigned projects enable students to develop an understanding of the 2D- and 3D- elements of design—point, line, plane, shape/form, value, color, and texture—along with the principles which unify these elements in a clear visual and conceptual organization. The project sequence also introduces students to the fundamental stages of designing interior space— including concept development, programming, diagramming, and schematic planning.

517 Design and Drawing I

530 Codes

Studio Credits: 2, No prerequisites

Lecture Credits: 2, Prerequisites: 517

This course introduces students to a range of traditional and digital tools and techniques for exploring and expressing their design ideas. Topics include hand drafting and an introduction to software, including a computer-aided drafting program, a 3D image-modeling program, and an image-editing program, such as Adobe Photoshop.

An introduction to building codes and legal regulations as they relate to interior design work is presented. Discussions cover building codes, the process of code development and revision, and the responsibilities of interior designers in incorporating code requirements in their work. Essential sections of the building code, such as egress, occupancy levels, regulations for the handicapped, general accessibility requirements, finish and material specifications and fire ratings, are included.

519 Textiles for Interiors Lecture Credits: 2, No prerequisites

This course is a survey of the history and science of fabrics through lectures on major decorative arts periods as well as textile design, fibers, methods of weaving, dyeing, flammability, finishes and trims. Properties, code requirements, and maintenance of contract and residential fabrics and their application are covered as well as estimating yardage. Also included in the course are lectures on the history of wallpaper and carpeting and their application to today’s interiors.

538 Interior Design Studio II Studio Credits: 4, Prerequisites: 528

Through studio projects, lectures, and discussions, this course provides an introduction to the design of the residential environment. Projects range in scale from the design of a single room to the design of a multi-room residence. Students are introduced to the design process, programming, the selection of furniture, fabrics, and finishes, space planning, and the preparation of professional presentations.

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Master of Fine Arts in Interior Design (MFA1)

CONT.

541 Color for Interiors

601 Modern Architecture and Design I

617 Building Systems

Studio Credits: 2, No prerequisites

Lecture Credits: 2, Prerequisites: 502 or 640

Lecture Credits: 2, Prerequisites: 587 AND 530

This studio course concentrates on the study of color and color schemes for interiors. Compilation of the Munsell Color Charts is the basis for a series of projects which lead to the development of complete color schemes. Psychological and practical influences affecting the choice of color are studied. Using gouache paints, colors for walls, floor coverings, window treatments, upholstery, accessories, and accent areas are selected and applied to a variety of room settings.

The sources of modern architecture and design are explored are explored from the 18th century designers Adam, Soane, and Ledoux through the 19th century and the work of the eclectic architects. The course examines how architects used stylistic elements of the past and adapted them to solve modern design problems. Each revival style is traced to the original era to explore the meaning of the adaptations. Through research and analysis, student develop awareness of historical precedents as the historical basis of modern designs and analyze the key formal and decorative attributes of the built environment.

A study of the materials and methods of plumbing, HVAC, fire protection, lighting, and electrical systems in relation to interior architecture and design. Through research and analysis, students become aware of the impact of materials, construction methods, and building systems on the built environment and develop an understanding of the relationships between codes, sustainability, culture, and human-environment interaction.

564 Environment and Behavior Lecture Credits: 2, No prerequisites

This introduction to environment and behavior studies explores individual and social human interaction with the physical environment. It examines perception and cognition, cultural differences in space use, proxemics, place-making, territoriality, the role of values in the design of the environment, wayfinding, and other aspects of environment-behavior studies.

587 Materials and Methods of Construction Lecture Credits: 2, Prerequisites: 517

Through observation and analysis, students will develop an understanding of the importance of interior construction methods, materials, finishes, and details. Students become familiar with the application of a wide variety of building materials through lectures, presentations, site visits, and the preparation of construction details.

591 Introduction to Professional Experience Credits: 1, No prerequisites

This course allows graduate students to gain practical training as interns working in a professional design office. This experience must be directly applicable to the study of interior design. Students must have completed 24 credits at the New York School of Interior Design to enroll in this course. Students are required to keep a journal each day of work, recording their observations, reflections on the work environment, and on their experiences. Students must provide a letter of invitation from the prospective employer/firm to their academic advisor. The employer letter must state the following: number of work hours per week (maximum 20 hours/week), schedule, salary, if any, the responsibilities and expectations for the position, and other required information. The employer must also sign a NYSID Employer Agreement before employment commences. Fall and Spring internships must fall within the dates of the semester. Summer dates are determined at time of approval by the academic advisor, and the International student advisor, if applicable. International students are also required to submit a request form to the international student advisor and receive an updated I-20 before they are permitted to begin employment. Beginning employment before or without receipt of an updated I-20 is illegal and has serious repercussions.

618 Interior Design Studio IV Studio Credits: 4, Prerequisites: 608

The second part of the overview of modern architecture, this course focuses on the period 1890 to the present in Europe and America. Styles and movements covered include the American Beaux Arts, the Chicago School, Art Nouveau, Vienna Secession, Futurism, Expressionism, Art Moderne, the Modern Movement, and Post-Modernism.

Projects involving diverse or special populations, such as children, the aged, or the disabled, present a design challenge. Students research case studies, project types, and relevant environment and behavior theory. Emphasis is placed on the development of a comprehensive solution using innovative and appropriate conceptual approaches. Students will further develop and refine their ability to express their ideas graphically and verbally, and to increase their proficiency in handling three-dimensional space.

606 Experiential Learning II

628 Interior Design Studio V

Lecture Credits: 3, Prerequisites: 618

Studio Credits: 4, Prerequisites: 618

This required course offers MFA-1 students a further opportunity to extend their interior design education beyond the classroom in a mentored, distance learning setting. In addition to pursuing their individual study option as they did in Experiential Learning I, (internship, service learning, or independent study), students will identify and research the specific sector of interior design practice relevant to the capstone thesis studio project they will be researching and designing in their third year, such as hospitality, workplace, or healthcare design. Students must submit proposals for approval for both their individual study options and their thesis topics prior to the start of the summer semester.

This course focuses on the design of hospitality environments, such as restaurants and hotels. This advanced studio requires students to integrate and synthesize the skills and knowledge gained throughout their studies to create a comprehensive project, including presentation drawings, models, material and furniture boards, detail drawings and specifications

602 Modern Architecture and Design II Lecture Credits: 2, Prerequisites: 601 or 640

608 Interior Design Studio III Studio Credits: 4, Prerequisites: 538

Building on the skills and knowledge acquired in ID Studio II, this course focuses on the design of workplace and retail environments, such as offices and boutiques. Students will develop their skills in research, programming, space planning, the selection of finishes, and the arrangement and selection of furnishings. Students will also learn the role and application of building codes to interior spaces and the technical skills required for more advanced presentations.

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631 Kitchen and Bath Design Studio Credits: 3, Prerequisites: 608 AND 636

This course is an in-depth introduction to the planning and design of kitchens and baths in residential and commercial applications. Design projects emphasize issues of accessibility and universal design, modularity, safety, manufactured products and appliances, materials, and industry standards. Space planning and construction details are emphasized. Students will understand sustainability and environmental impact as it applies to the design and construction of custom kitchens and baths, including appliances, cabinetry, surfacing, and applied finishes.

633 Lighting I Studio Credits: 3, Prerequisites: 538

Students are introduced to basic technical and creative concepts in lighting interior spaces, with emphasis on the architectural aspects of lighting design. Human factors, floor planning, color, materials, and the behavior of light are discussed, along with lamps, fixtures, layout, and circuiting. Students work on studio projects and develop interior lighting plans and specifications. Through research and analysis students will develop an understanding of the relationship of light to the various elements of the built environment and its role in protecting the health, safety, and welfare of the end-user.


634 Advanced Detailing Studio Credits: 2, Prerequisites: 631

Millwork detailing is explored as applied to architectural interiors. The projects focus on the development of design and drawing skills related to paneling, built-in cabinetry, staircases, and other specialties. Through research and analysis, students develop an understanding of the importance of the selection and specification of materials and construction methods to the functional and aesthetic quality of architectural woodwork and the interior environment.

635 Theory of the Built Environment Lecture Credits: 2, Prerequisites: 642

This seminar is an in-depth analysis of the relationship between theory, practice, and socio-historical considerations in architecture and interior design. Beginning with a discussion of the various approaches to and functions of theory, both traditional and critical, the course focuses on a close reading of major primary texts of architecture and design theory. The relationship between these theories and the built works they inform will be analyzed in their appropriate historical and critical contexts. Through lecture and discussion of assigned readings, the course will stress the importance of theory for the achievement of a socially appropriate and responsible design.

636 Construction Documents Studio Credits: 3, Prerequisites: 527 AND 587

This course introduces students to the preparation of construction documents using Revit. Students will gain an overview of construction drawing formats and conventions, while learning to develop the plans, elevations, sections, and details that form part of a set of interior design working drawings for a small commercial or residential project.

639 Advanced Graphic Communications Studio Credits: 3, Prerequisites: 527 AND 636

Building on 636 Construction Documents, students explore the use of digital drawing software, such as Revit, as a design and presentation tool. Threedimensional modeling techniques and lighting, color, texture, and material assignments will be used to create compelling and realistic renderings.

641 Interior Design Practice Lecture Credits: 2, Prerequisites: 608

This course focuses on the business, legal, financial, managerial, and ethical considerations of interior design practice. Topics working with vendors, workrooms, contractors, consultants, the order process, project management, and working with clients, as well as the important issue of legal recognition of the profession and licensing of the interior designers.

642 MFA1 Thesis Preparation

680 Independent Study

Studio Credits: 2, No prerequisites

Studio Credits: 2, Prerequisites: 506 or 650

This research-based course lays the foundation for the thesis project to be executed in the following semester. In consultation with the instructor, students will select an appropriate project type, conduct research including case studies, identify relevant environment-behavior research, select a site, prepare base building drawings, and write a detailed project statement and program.

This course option allows the experienced student with a 3.5 GPA or better and 30 completed credits to create an individual program of study with a faculty member. Students are required to present an outline of their intended study to the program director and OAA for approval prior to registration.

643 Lighting II

This course offers elective academic credit for college-monitored work experience, and is open to students matriculated in the third year of the MFA-1 and the first year of the MFA-2 degree programs and who have a cumulative GPA of at least 3.0. It is designed to build on skills already learned in the classroom and to acquire new ones. Students have the opportunity to integrate theory and practice and, in doing so, gain professional experience. An internship for 3 credits consists of 240 hours of contact time at the job placement site. An internship for 2 credits consists of 160 hours of contact time at the job placement site. Grading is Pass/Fail only.

Studio Credits: 3, Prerequisites: 633

The goal of this course is to expand upon the skills and vocabulary of lighting knowledge gained in Lighting I by applying them to solve design problems in architectural lighting projects. Course lectures familiarize the student with lighting design strategies, graphics, and circuiting techniques, creation of specification booklets and basic dimming systems as well as specialty topics such as decorative luminaires and energy efficiency. The influence of lighting on color and related psychological effects are explored.

644 Furniture Design

690 Advanced Internship Studio Credits: 3, Prerequisites: 618

Studio Credits: 3, Prerequisites: 628 AND 634

This design studio focuses on the aesthetic and functional issues related to the creation of custom freestanding furniture. The process of designing furniture prototypes from the initial articulation of design objectives to the technical exploration of their manufacture, including analysis of the environmental impact of the object, will be explored. Discussions and assignments lead to the design of three original furniture prototypes, one of which is required to be developed using the metric system.

648 MFA1 Thesis Studio Credits: 4, Prerequisites: 642

The thesis is the final interior design studio project of the MFA- program. Students implement the project that was identified and researched in the Thesis Preparation course. All phases of a professional project are explored: research, programming, analysis of existing conditions, design criteria, concept development, schematic and detailed presentation drawings, models, material boards, and selected details. The course culminates in a formal presentation and critique by a jury of professionals and all projects are exhibited in the annual thesis exhibition.

New York School of Interior Design  •  Academic Catalog 2020/2021  • 19


Master of Fine Arts In Interior Design (MFA2) MISSION STATEMENT The Master of Fine Arts in Interior Design (MFA2) is a two-year, full-time, 60-credit post-professional terminal degree program that provides practicing professionals in interior design, architecture, environmental design, and closely-related fields with the opportunity for advanced creative and academic scholarship in interior design. Through the core design studio sequence, specialty studios, lectures, seminars, and electives, students experience a diverse array of design approaches and project types, and projects of increasing complexity culminating in a thesis studio. The MFA-2 curriculum is formulated to increase understanding of related design disciplines, with special emphasis on their interdependence. An interdisciplinary approach to design is increasingly valuable for professional advancement as designers are asked to satisfy the complex requirements of contemporary architectural and interior environments. There are four components to the program: a core design studio sequence, specialty studios, lectures/seminars, and electives. The thesis (11 credits), required as a culminating project, consists of 3 credits of directed research followed by an 8-credit studio project. Each student must demonstrate originality, research, and design skills, and the creative capacity to resolve advanced problems in design. The thesis is presented to a jury of faculty and professional designers and experts for evaluation. Forty-nine (47) credits are in required courses and thirteen (13) credits are in elective courses. All courses within the Master of Fine Arts program (MFA2) are graded using the Letter Grade system. Refer to the current NYSID Student Handbook for Grading Descriptions and Standards. To earn the MFA2 degree, a student must have a minimum cumulative/ career GPA of 3.0. Students graduate with a deeper understanding of the interdisciplinary nature of the design of the built environment, the ability to articulate and resolve advanced problems in design, and are prepared to become global leaders of the interior design profession.

CURRICULUM (60 CREDITS) Students must complete 60 credits in the MFA2 program, of which a minimum of 39 credits must be in studio courses.

FIRST SEMESTER — 15 CREDITS 640 Design Studio I (6) 616 History and Theory of Interior Design I: The Classical Tradition (3) Specialty Studio (3) Electives (3)

SECOND SEMESTER — 15 CREDITS 650 Design Studio II (6) 626 History and Theory of Interior Design II: The Modern Tradition (3) Specialty Studio (3) Electives (3)

THIRD SEMESTER — 15 CREDITS 660 Directed Thesis Research (3) 2 Specialty Studios (3 + 3) Lecture / Seminar (3) Electives (3)

FOURTH SEMESTER — 15 CREDITS 670 Thesis Studio (8) Specialty Studio (3) Electives (4)

SPECIALTY STUDIOS — 15 CREDITS As offered: 612 Product Design (3) 613 Lighting Design (3) 614 Set Design (3) 615 Retail Design (3) 622 Green Design (3) 623 Furniture Design (3) 624 Hospitality Design (3) 625 Exhibition Design (3) 651 Landscape Design (3)

LECTURES/SEMINARS — 11 CREDITS As offered: 621 Office Design (3) 647 Sociology of the Domestic Interior (3) 656 Sociology of the Contemporary Environment (3) 665 History and Theory of Aesthetics (3)

ELECTIVES — 11 CREDITS Students in the MFA-2 program may choose electives from both undergraduate and graduate course offerings with approval of their advisor. No core BFA studios may be used as electives.

20  •  New York School of Interior Design  •  Academic Catalog 2020/2021


MFA2 Course Descriptions 591 Introduction to Professional Experience

602 Modern Architecture and Design II

622 Green Design

Credits: 1, No prerequisites

Lecture Credits: 2, Prerequisites: 601 or 640

Studio Credits: 3, No prerequisites

This course allows undergraduate students to gain practical training as design assistants or entry-level interns working in a professional design office. This experience must be directly applicable to the study of interior design. Students must have completed 24 credits at the New York School of Interior Design to enroll in this course. Students are required to keep a journal each day of work, recording their observations, reflections on the work environment, and on their experiences. Students must provide a letter of invitation from the prospective employer/ firm to their academic advisor. The employer letter must state the following: number of work hours per week (maximum 20 hours/week), schedule, salary, if any, the responsibilities and expectations for the position, and other required information. The employer must also sign a NYSID Employer Agreement before employment commences. Fall and Spring internships must fall within the dates of the semester. Summer dates are determined at time of approval by the academic advisor, and the International student advisor, if applicable. International students are also required to submit a request form to the international student advisor and receive an updated I-20 before they are permitted to begin employment. Beginning employment before or without receipt of an updated I-20 is illegal and has serious repercussions.

The second part of the overview of modern architecture, this course focuses on the period 1890 to the present in Europe and America. Styles and movements covered include the American Beaux Arts, the Chicago School, Art Nouveau, Vienna Secession, Futurism, Expressionism, Art Moderne, the Modern Movement, and Post-Modernism.

Interior designers and architects have become increasingly responsible for formulating environmentally responsible design solutions. In this course, students learn to incorporate parameters for energy reduction, health, and sustainable construction and finish materials, HVAC, lighting, recycling, and cost payback into the research and completion of one or more “green” design projects.

601 Modern Architecture and Design I Lecture Credits: 2, Prerequisites: 502 or 640

The sources of modern architecture and design are explored are explored from the 18th century designers Adam, Soane, and Ledoux through the 19th century and the work of the eclectic architects. The course examines how architects used stylistic elements of the past and adapted them to solve modern design problems. Each revival style is traced to the original era to explore the meaning of the adaptations. Through research and analysis, student develop awareness of historical precedents as the historical basis of modern designs and analyze the key formal and decorative attributes of the built environment.

612 Product Design Studio Credits: 3, No prerequisites

This studio explores the marketing, psychology, conceptualization, and design of products commonly found in interiors, from tableware to telephones.

613 Lighting Design Studio Credits: 3, No prerequisites

A formal introduction to architectural lighting design for students with experience in architecture and/or interior design. Students are introduced to basic technical and creative concepts in lighting interior spaces. Vision, perception, color, lamps, fixtures, layout, and dimming/control of light are all discussed. Students work on a studio project and develop interior lighting plans and specifications.

614 Set Design Studio Credits: 3, No prerequisites

This course introduces the related discipline of set design. Students will utilize their previously acquired knowledge, technical skills, and creativity to investigate the issues and techniques involved in designing for the theater, television, and film.

615 Retail Design Studio Credits: 3, No prerequisites

623 Furniture Design Studio Credits: 3, No prerequisites

This course focuses on the process of designing furniture prototypes from the initial articulation of design objectives to the technical exploration of their manufacture. Discussions and assignments lead to the design of three original furniture prototypes.

624 Hospitality Design Studio Credits: 3, No prerequisites

In this course, students undertake a design project that develops a restaurant or hotel interior. Discussion topics covered include: the growth of tourist industries; the impact of changing economic conditions and public tastes; and the planning and furnishing of hotels and restaurants.

625 Exhibition Design Studio Credits: 3, No prerequisites

A successful exhibit generates interest and excitement about its subject matter. This course focuses on the special challenge of designing an appropriate exhibition for a gallery, museum, trade show, convention, or showroom.

This design studio focuses on advanced problems in store planning and design. Course projects range in scale from small retail environments to advanced merchandising for department stores. Students learn about programming, space utilization, fixtures and display, as well as the role the interior designer plays in establishing the image and visual identity of a retailer.

640 Design Studio I

621 Office Design

616 History and Theory of Interior Design: The Classical Tradition

Lecture Credits: 3, No prerequisites

This course traces the development of the design of the office workplace, the single biggest speciality in contract interior design. Beginning with the rise of commerce and banking, progressing through the revolution in technology, downsizing and globalization, students examine in depth the interdisciplinary contributions by interior designers, architects, industrial designers, real estate and development firms, bankers, and business users.

Studio Credits: 6, No prerequisites

The objective of this studio is to focus conceptually and analytically on the manipulation of interior space using a contemporary program in a historical context. Students will analyze a landmarked building and develop a design that accommodates a program of new uses.

Lecture Credits: 3, No prerequisites

This research seminar is an in-depth analysis of the classical tradition in architecture and interior design from Versailles to Post-Modern classicism. Students will read primary theoretical texts, give an oral presentation and develop a research paper on an aspect or work of classical design. Students will be instructed in how to conduct advanced scholarly research and write formal analyses of buildings and interiors.

New York School of Interior Design  •  Academic Catalog 2020/2021  • 21


Master of Fine Arts In Interior Design (MFA2)

CONT.

647 Sociology of the Domestic Interior

665 History and Theory of Aesthetics

Lecture Credits: 3, No prerequisites

Lecture Credits: 3, No prerequisites

This seminar analyzes the factors that shape domestic interiors from Ancient Greece to Post-Modernism. A variety of sources of meaning for each period will be examined including language of furniture, social factors, power, prestige, gender issues, the role of childhood, and technological advances. In addition to lectures and discussions, emphasis will be placed on conducting scholarly research using databases and libraries.

This seminar focuses on the history and theory of Aesthetics from the late 17th century writings of Claude Perrault to the Surrealist Manifestos of the 20th century. Writers covered include the Germans Baumgarten, Kant and Hegel; the French theorists Laugier, Boullée, and Breton; the English authors Hogarth, Wordsworth, Burke, Price, and Ruskin. Emphasis is on an analysis of major aesthetic categories (the Beautiful, the Sublime, the Picturesque, the Exotic, the Surreal) and their relationship to actual works of art and design, past and present.

650 Design Studio II Studio Credits: 6, Prerequisites: 640

The objective of this studio is a comprehensive and detailed design of a new set of interior spaces within a modern multi-tenant building shell such as a residential condominium, office building, airport, or shopping mall. Students analyze the complex relationships among tenants, developers, architects, engineers, interior designers, and others in the planning and implementation of tenant projects within such structures.

670 Thesis Studio Studio Credits: 8, Prerequisites: 660

The thesis is a culminating interior design project requiring a comprehensive solution to a stated design problem of the student’s choice. This capstone experience involves advanced exploration of pertinent theoretical issues and is based on systematic research and analysis.

651 Landscape Design

680 Independent Study

Studio Credits: 3, No prerequisites

Studio Credits: 2, Prerequisites: 506 or 650

This studio explores the concepts, principles, and methods of landscape design with special focus on the relationships between landscape and interior design. Students will develop a studio project that relates interior and exterior space through the discourse of landscaping and plant design.

This course option allows the experienced student with a 3.5 GPA or better and 30 completed credits to create an individual program of study with a faculty member. Students are required to present an outline of their intended study to the program director and OAA for approval prior to registration.

626 History and Theory of Interior Design II: Modern Tradition

690 Advanced Internship

Lecture Credits: 3, Prerequisites: 645

This seminar analyzes the modernist and avant-garde traditions in architecture and interior design. Emphasis is on the critical reading and in-class discussion of the major writings on modern design theory and criticism from the Gothic Revival and the Arts and Crafts to Free-Form Modernism. Students will develop research topics into a final paper dealing with the relationship between modern theory and practice.

656 Sociology of the Contemporary Environment Lecture Credits: 3, No prerequisites

This seminar explores the relationship of contemporary interior and architectural design and their subtle sociological and psychological effects on the general public. The changing environment is examined in relation to the resulting innate human response as it weighs the influences of technology, communication, workplace, and megastructures against the collective psyche.

Studio Credits: 3, Prerequisites: 618

This course offers elective academic credit for college-monitored work experience, and is open to students matriculated in the third year of the MFA-1 and the first year of the MFA-2 degree programs and who have a cumulative GPA of at least 3.0. It is designed to build on skills already learned in the classroom and to acquire new ones. Students have the opportunity to integrate theory and practice and, in doing so, gain professional experience. An internship for 3 credits consists of 240 hours of contact time at the job placement site. An internship for 2 credits consists of 160 hours of contact time at the job placement site. Grading is Pass/Fail only.

660 Directed Thesis Research Studio Credits: 3, Prerequisites: 650

In consultation with faculty, students select challenging subjects that relate to issues in the world of design today. Each student conducts systematic research and analyzes ideas that become the foundation for the thesis (670).

22  •  New York School of Interior Design  •  Academic Catalog 2020/2021


Master of Professional Studies in Healthcare Interior Design (MPSH)

FULL-TIME CURRICULUM 30 CREDITS, 1 YEAR FIRST SEMESTER — 12 CREDITS

MISSION STATEMENT The Master of Professional Studies in Healthcare Interior Design (MPSH/MPSHD) prepares graduates to plan, design and coordinate responsive and responsible healthcare interiors that impact the health and well-being of patients and staff, through the application of research findings on the effect of physical space and materials on health, and the understanding of the business of healthcare. The Master of Professional Studies in Healthcare Interior Design (MPSH) is a 30-credit post-professional program focused on the specialized knowledge, thinking, and skills required by design, construction, and planning professionals as they create varied healthcare settings including inpatient, ambulatory care and medical office spaces. The program’s curricula has two complementary threads: understanding environment and behavior research as it applies to healing and restorative designs, and the business of healthcare. In this cohort-based program, students are part of an integrated, interdisciplinary collaborative experience reflective of the real-world of healthcare interior design and decision-making. Courses include research methods, history and theory of healthcare, environment and behavior studies, and design studio. Sustainable design and applied research related to physical and mental health, productivity, the delivery of care and performance will be integrated throughout. The MPSH program may be completed through full-time study in one year, or part-time study in two years, and is structured to accommodate working professionals by offering all classes on weekday evenings. The full-time program consists of two 15-week semesters composed of lectures/ seminars, and studios followed by an 8-week summer session; part-time study requires a minimum enrollment of 6 credits for each semester, and three credits in each of the summer sessions. All of the 30 credits required for the MPS-H degree must be taken at NYSID. All courses within the Master of Professional Studies in Healthcare Interior Design are graded Pass, Low Pass, or Fail. Credit will be given for passing grades, Pass (P) or Low Pass (LP). No credit will be given for a grade of Fail (F). Refer to the current NYSID Student Handbook for Grading Descriptions and Standards.

710 711 719 731

Survey of Healthcare Environments (3) Introduction to Research Methods (3) Materials, Textiles, and Furnishings for Healthcare Settings (3) Programming for Healthcare Environments (3)

SECOND SEMESTER — 12 CREDITS 715 720 721 722

History & Theory of Healthcare (3) Healthcare Studio I (3) Applied Research Methods (3) Building Systems for Healthcare (3)

SUMMER SESSION — 6 CREDITS 712 The Business of Healthcare (3) 730 Healthcare Studio II (3)

PART-TIME CURRICULUM 30 CREDITS, 2 YEARS FALL START SEQUENCE Fall Semester (6): 710, 719 Spring Semester (6): 715, 722 Summer Session (3): 712 Fall Semester (6): 711, 731 Spring Semester (6): 720, 721 Summer Session (3): 730

SPRING START SEQUENCE Spring Semester (6): 715, 722 Summer Session (3): 712 Fall Semester (6): 710, 711 Spring Semester (6): 720, 721 Summer Session (3): 730 Fall Semester (6): 719, 731

SUMMER START SEQUENCE

Admission to the MPS in Healthcare Interior Design program requires formal acceptance. Students with prior degrees in interior design, architecture, engineering, or a closely related field must submit a portfolio demonstrating their professional–level education and experience. This degree does not lead to licensure in interior design.

Summer Session (3): 712 Fall Semester (6): 710, 711 Spring Semester (6): 720, 721 Summer Session (3): 730 Fall Semester (6): 719, 731 Spring Session (6): 715, 722

New York School of Interior Design  •  Academic Catalog 2020/2021  • 23


Master of Professional Studies in Healthcare Interior Design (MPSH)

CONT.

MPS-H Course Descriptions 710 Survey of Healthcare Environments

721 Applied Research Methods

Lecture Credits: 3, No prerequisites

Lecture Credits: 3, Prerequisites: 710 AND 711

Students will be introduced to current planning and design considerations for healthcare facilities. Conducted as a series of professional seminars examining overall planning and design considerations, and a detailed study of specific care areas, such as oncology, surgery, pediatrics, and others.

Students will design and implement one small research project. They will present their findings in the form of a paper, and poster or PowerPoint presentation typically presented at academic conferences.

711 Introduction to Healthcare Design Research

Healthcare settings require by code, custom, and practice specific building systems. This course is an in-depth examination of the special mechanical systems used in hospitals and other care environments.

Lecture Credits: 3, No prerequisites

Designers of healthcare environments must understand the research methods used in evidencebased design, which complement evidence-based medicine. In this course, students will explore alternate research methodologies and their philosophical and epistemological foundations.

712 The Business of Healthcare Lecture Credits: 3, No prerequisites

Past and current models of healthcare organizations and project types will be reviewed, along with an analysis of the different corporate structures, hierarchies, and roles common to various healthcare organizations.

715 History and Theory of Healthcare Lecture Credits: 3, No prerequisites

This course examines the history and range of theories on the relationships between human beings, their health and well-being and the design of the physical setting for care. Students will be introduced to the connections between medical thought, health-care delivery and health facility design at different historical periods, and across different cultures and societies.

722 Building Systems for Healthcare Lecture Credits: 3, No prerequisites

730 Healthcare Studio II Studio Credits: 3, Prerequisites: 720

Studio course focused on the planning and design of key areas within an academic medical center or hospital within an urban context preceded by an analysis of hospital structures.

731 Programming for Healthcare Environments Lecture Credits: 3, No prerequisites

Programming is a predesign process that is used to determine the needs of end-users at every organizational level. Then, through post-occupancy evaluations (POEs), designers are able to evaluate the designed environment to determine its success in meeting the needs of the end-users and how well the initial program was met. This course will introduce the practice of programming and post-occupancy evaluation for interior environments, specifically healthcare.

719 Materials, Textiles and Furnishings for Healthcare Settings Lecture Credits: 3, No prerequisites

Materials, finishes, and furnishings play a big role in the perception of specialized healthcare interiors by patients, practitioners, and families. Through this course, students will learn how to specify these elements on the basis of performance, environmentbehavior findings, life-cycle, and maintenance.

720 Healthcare Studio I Studio Credits: 3, Prerequisites: 710 AND 711

Students will understand the technical and aesthetic development of healthcare projects and spaces of varying sizes and scope. Knowledge from previous classes will be applied to the design solution.

24  •  New York School of Interior Design  •  Academic Catalog 2020/2021


30 CREDITS, 1 YEAR

Master of Professional Studies in Lighting Design (MPSL) Master of Professional Studies in Lighting Design Online (MPSLD)

FALL SEMESTER — 12 CREDITS 709 727 729 732 737 739

MISSION STATEMENT The Master of Professional Studies in Lighting Design (MPSL, MPSLD) provides a graduate education dedicated exclusively to the exploration of the artistic, technical, and intellectual dimensions of lighting design. The comprehensive curriculum covers technological innovation, energy and economics, the profound impact of light on health and human experience and prepares students to create visually compelling compositions realized through the transformative power of light.

Lighting Exploration Intensive (1) Science of Light (2) Lighting Design Process (2) Rendering and Representation for Lighting Design (2) Light Source Selection and Evaluation (2) Lighting Design Studio I (3)

SPRING SEMESTER — 12 CREDITS 724 741 746 750 759

History of Lighting in New York City (2) Luminaire Design (2) Lighting Controls and Systems Technology (2) Lighting Design Studio II (4) Business of Light (2)

SUMMER SESSION — 6 CREDITS

The MPSL, MPSLD provides students with the range and depth of knowledge and skills necessary to be leaders in the broad field of lighting design of the built environment with an emphasis on interiors. Coursework reflects the most current topics, strategies, and applications of lighting, as well as principles of sustainability and energy conservation as they relate to the discipline; natural and electric lighting; control systems, integrated and responsive systems design, history and theory, code compliance, financial analysis, and business practices. Through topical seminars and lighting design studios, students apply acquired knowledge and research to a range of commercial, institutional, and residential project types. Class size is limited, encouraging active participation, collaboration, and sharing of ideas.

723 Health Factors of Lighting and Daylighting (2) 735 Lighting Design Studio III (2) 745 Retail, Art, and Exhibition Lighting (2)

Graduates are prepared to pursue careers in a variety of industry sectors, including lighting design of the built environment, luminaire design and manufacturing, and equipment specification sales. The program prepares graduates to earn NCQLP (National Council on Qualification for Lighting Professions) certification after they have acquired the requisite professional experience. Courses in the 30-credit MPSL program are scheduled for weekday evenings to accommodate working professionals. The program may be completed through full-time study in three semesters/sessions. The full-time program consists of two 15-week semesters composed of lectures/seminars, and studios, followed by an 8-week summer session. Distance students are required to be on campus for an intensive course that runs 3–4 days each semester and during the summer session. All courses within the Master of Professional Studies in Lighting Design program are graded Pass, Low Pass, or Fail. Credit will be given for passing grades, Pass (P) or Low Pass (LP). No credit will be given for a grade of Fail (F). Non-MPSL students enrolled in MPS courses will receive traditional letter grades. Refer to the current NYSID Student Handbook for Grading Descriptions and Standards and for requirements regarding academic standing. Admission to the MPS in Lighting Design program requires formal acceptance. Students are required to hold a prior degree in interior design, architecture, theatrical lighting design, engineering, or a closely related field such as industrial design or product design, and must submit a portfolio of their work demonstrating design skills, along with a detailed curriculum vitae. Applicants are strongly encouraged to achieve basic proficiency in 2-dimensional technical drawing using AutoCAD (Windows operating system) prior to beginning the program.

New York School of Interior Design  •  Academic Catalog 2020/2021  • 25


Master of Professional Studies in Lighting Design (MPSL)

CONT.

MPSL Course Descriptions Lecture Credits: 1, Co-requisite 739

732 Rendering and Representation for Lighting Design

744 Applied Principles of Sustainable Lighting

This course is a hands-on studio using the state-of-the-art NYSID Lighting Lab for full-scale explorations of lighting. Topics will include perception of space, interaction between materials and light, reflection and refraction, color perception, transitions and storytelling with light. Each studio session will include peer critiques and discussion of full-scale lighting assignments.

Studio Credits: 2, No prerequisites

Lecture Credits: 2, No prerequisites

This course introduces students to the various techniques for illustrating lighting design concepts. Both traditional and digital methods will be explored as a means of accurately conveying the effects of lighting within interior spaces, enhancing modeling of objects and textured surfaces, and rendering color.

The success of a sustainable interior is directly linked to the quality and efficiency of its artificial illumination. Students will be introduced to the newest technologies and ones in development as they consider methods for integrating artificial and natural illumination leading to a well-lit and efficient result.

723 Health Factors of Lighting and Daylighting

735 Lighting Design Studio III

745 Retail, Art and Exhibition Lighting

Studio Credits: 2, Prerequisites: 750

Lecture Credits: 2, Prerequisites: 727 or 613

Lecture Credits: 2, Prerequisites: 739 or 643

Lighting Workshop III is a studio course designed for advanced study of lighting design and treatments for existing spaces, with a focus on special topics including lighting for exteriors, historical spaces, health and wellness.

This course covers the application of lighting principles to create project documentation encompassing lighting sources and controls. Utilizing their current studio projects, students will create lighting layouts, zoning diagrams, luminaire schedules, and controls specifications including code and certification requirements..

709 Lighting Exploration Intensive

Health Factors of Lighting and Daylighting introduces students to light in the context of health research and applications. Topics covered include a review of current research, circadian entrainment, light spectrum and its impact on IPRGCs and melatonin suppression. Measurement techniques, including Melanopic Lux and CS calculations to assess design performance from a light and health perspective will be introduced. Students will expand their study of daylighting, including the psychological and physiological benefits of daylight and exterior views, architectural techniques to maximize daylight availability, and calculation techniques for daylight penetration using photometric simulation tools.

724 History of Lighting in New York City Lecture Credits: 2, No prerequisites

In this intensive course, students are introduced to the history and theory of lighting, how lighting changes with technological advances, relates to culture and society, and influences aesthetic preferences. Using New York City as a living classroom, the class will investigate historic solutions and modern interpretations.

727 Science of Light Lecture Credits: 2, No prerequisites

This course introduces students to the principles and concepts of lighting. Students will develop an understanding of optics, the effects of light on people’s physical health and psychological well-being, and the influence of lighting conditions on people’s visual capabilities. Class lectures and assignments will cover light source physics and lighting measurement, as well as the principles of spatial vision, visual comfort, and color.

729 Lighting Design Process Lecture Credits: 2, No prerequisites

This course introduces students to the principles and concepts of lighting. Students will develop an understanding of optics, the effects of light on people’s physical health and psychological well-being, and the influence of lighting conditions on people’s visual capabilities. Class lectures and assignments will cover light source physics and lighting measurement, as well as the principles of spatial vision, visual comfort, and color.

737 Light Source Selection and Evaluation Lecture Credits: 2, No prerequisites

In this course, students will learn how to determine the best light source for any application. Lectures will cover the full range of sources including new and developing technologies. Students will do mock-ups of various installation conditions and calculate light levels for each.

739 Lighting Design Studio I Studio Credits: 4, No prerequisites

Over the course of the semester, Lighting Design Studio I integrates design projects with knowledge gained in courses taken concurrently. Students will develop comprehensive lighting solutions and provide peer feedback for a variety of spaces including residential, retail, hospitality and commercial environments. The scope of work will include conceptual sketches, photometric studies, lighting plans and details, lighting controls considerations and lighting specifications.

741 Luminaire Design Lecture Credits: 2, Prerequisites: 729 AND 732 or 613

This course focuses on the history and functionality of the design of decorative and architectural luminaires. Studies include period styles, thematic content, and religious context as well as form, materials, and luminous characteristics. Students will research, design, and fabricate a working prototype of a custom decorative luminaire and design an architectural luminaire for a specific function. The projects correspond with the IESNYC Student Lighting Competition and Robert Bruce Thompson Lighting Design competition. A factory tour or site visit will be included.

26  •  New York School of Interior Design  •  Academic Catalog 2020/2021

750 Lighting Design Studio II Studio Credits: 4, Prerequisites: 739

This course requires students to synthesize the knowledge and skills gained throughout the program to create comprehensive lighting design solutions for a variety of increasingly complex and specialized environments. Students are required to prepare presentation drawings, light maps, calculations, details, and specifications. Emphasis is placed on innovation through emerging technology and cutting edge industry practice. Industry professionals will be invited to provide feedback throughout the semester. Students are required as a condition of this course to display their projects in the annual spring graduate exhibition, along with selected examples of their exceptional work from other program courses.

759 Business of Light Lecture Credits: 2, Prerequisites: 741

This course is intended to give students an understanding of providing professional lighting design services independently or in the context of interior design or architecture firms. Topics such as contracts, specifications, and other business procedures are covered, as well as, project management, shop drawings review, mock-ups, commissioning, and maintenance.


Master of Professional Studies in Sustainable Interior Environments (MPSS) Master of Professional Studies in Sustainable Interior Environments Online(MPSSD)

FULL-TIME CURRICULUM 30 CREDITS, 1 YEAR FIRST SEMESTER — 12 CREDITS 725 History and Theory of Sustainable Design (2) 726 Fundamentals of Sustainable Design (2) 734 Principles of Sustainable Lighting for Interiors (2) 736 Materials and Finishes for the Sustainable Interior (2) 742 Sustainable Studio I— Residential Environments (4)

MISSION STATEMENT The Master of Professional Studies in Sustainable Interior Environments provides a post-professional graduate education focusing on human welfare, resource conservation, and the practical application of sustainable interior design strategies. Graduates of the program will be able to apply triple bottom line accounting—people, planet, and profitability—to future design projects and to provide leadership in organizations that hold these core values. The program prepares designers to understand high-performance building design principles; to work collaboratively to create innovative and beautiful residential and commercial spaces; and to anticipate growing market demands for resilient, energy efficient, and healthy interior environments.

SECOND SEMESTER — 12 CREDITS 728 733 743 744 752

Sustainable Interior Design Process (2) Sustainable Soft Goods (2) Sustainable Hard Goods (2) Applied Principles for Sustainable Lighting (2) Sustainable Studio II—Contract Environments (4)

SUMMER SESSION — 6 CREDITS

The Master of Professional Studies in Sustainable Interior Environments (MPSS) and Master of Professional Studies in Sustainable Interior Environments Online (MPSSD) are 30-credit post-professional programs focused on specialized knowledge, thinking, and skills, structured to prepare design professionals to assume leadership roles in developing and maintaining sustainable interior spaces that will positively impact the world. The curriculum and learning goals of the two programs are the same. The curriculum provides rigorous professional education in the area of sustainable design focused on the interior environment, exposing students to a range of topics, research methods, integrated design development methodologies, and sustainable project management practices. Course work addresses the history and theory of sustainability, principles of sustainable materials, natural and artificial lighting and control systems, integrated environmental systems design, indoor air quality, as well as green textiles, furnishings, and decorative elements. The program includes two major studios designed to integrate acquired knowledge and research while exploring both residential and nonresidential environments. Graduates have a thorough knowledge of the LEED rating systems, the WELL Building Standard, Living Building Challenge, Passive House Standard, and Powerhouse.

747 Frontiers of Sustainable Interior Environments(2) 738 Constructing, Operating and Maintaining Sustainable Interiors (2) 749 Environmental Systems for the Sustainable Interior (2)

The MPS-S/MPSSD program may be completed through full-time study in one year, and is structured to accommodate working professionals by offering all classes in the evening and on weekends. The full-time program consists of two 15-week semesters composed of lectures/ seminars, and studios, followed by an 8-week summer session. All of the 30 credits required for the MPSS/ MPSSD degree must be taken at NYSID. The online program is offered in a synchronous format and requires log-in and attendence at set times. All courses within the Master of Professional Studies in Sustainable Interior Environments are graded Pass, Low Pass, or Fail. Credit will be given for passing grades, Pass (P) or Low Pass (LP). No credit will be given for a grade of Fail (F). Refer to the current NYSID Student Handbook for Grading Descriptions and Standards. Admission to the MPS in Sustainable Interior Environments (MPSS/ MPSSD) programs require formal acceptance and a first-professional degree in interior design, architecture, engineering, or a closely related field, and submission of a portfolio demonstrating the applicant’s professional–level education and experience. All MPSS courses are for MPSS students only. Any other students wishing to register for a MPSS course must do so by written request to the program director.

New York School of Interior Design  •  Academic Catalog 2020/2021  • 27


Master of Professional Studies in Sustainable Interior Environments (MPSS) CONT.

MPSS Course Descriptions 725 History and Theory of Sustainable Design

736 Materials and Finishes for the Sustainable Interior

747 Frontiers of Sustainable Interior Environments

Lecture Credits: 2, No prerequisites

Lecture Credits: 2, No prerequisites

Lecture Credits: 2, Prerequisites: 738

Students are introduced to the history and theory of sustainability and explore precedents in the vernacular and designed environments. Students will become familiar with the evolving relationship between the built human environment and the finite nature of the planet, including the role and impact of regional differences due to geography, weather and culture.

This course instructs designers in the analysis, evaluation, and selection of construction and finish materials for the sustainable interior. Students will learn methods of determining material appropriateness and considerations when designing a green interior along with understanding the LEED rating system as applied to interior materials.

726 Fundamentals of Sustainable Design

738 Constructing, Operating and Maintaining Sustainable Interiors

The field of sustainable and resilient interior design is rapidly evolving even as it matures. Through guest speakers, class discussions and individual research, students will analyze and posit how the field is changing or needs to change to accommodate new understandings of environmental and societal issues along with addressing designers’ professional responsibilities to their clients and the planet. Students will conduct an individual research project on a topic chosen with their instructor and will produce a formal research paper and academic poster suitable for submission to a professional conference.

Lecture Credits: 2, No prerequisites

Principles and concepts of sustainability should provide the context for design decisions for the built environment of the 21st century. Students will develop an understanding of why current and future makers of the built environment must think differently than in the past, through close examination of contemporary issues, including ecological sustainability, environmental justice and well-being.

728 Sustainable Interior Design Process Lecture Credits: 2, No prerequisites

This course examines the task of developing a sustainable project from the pre-design phase up to construction, and the various strategies for structuring the project team and workflow. The course focuses on the Integrative Design Process, which differs from the conventional approach to design and construction by adopting a collaborative design process that includes all stakeholders and their roles.

733 Sustainable Soft Goods Lecture Credits: 2, No prerequisites

This course examines both mass market and custom soft goods, and introduces students to the analytical methods for determining appropriate choices for designing and selecting soft goods for a sustainable interior. Upholstery frames, fillings, and finish textiles for furnishings, as well as window treatments and floor coverings are covered. Both new and remanufactured goods are explored, along with issues related to sourcing and transportation.

734 Principles of Sustainable Lighting for Interiors Lecture Credits: 2, No prerequisites

Students are introduced to basic technical and creative concepts in lighting interior spaces with emphasis on the sustainable and well-being aspects of lighting design including energyefficiency and human factors. What is the design objective of the lighting of a project? How may it be achieved? Students will consider treatments and methods to apply artificial lighting and daylighting strategies to their concurrent studio projects.

Lecture Credits: 2, Prerequisites: 728

This course builds on knowledge gained in 728 Sustainable Interior Design Process, continuing the initial study to focus on the strategies and procedures that are fundamental to implementing a sustainable project, starting from the Integrated Project Management (IDP) point of substantial completion, to performance of a Post-Occupancy Evaluation (POE), and understanding the role of proper ongoing maintenance. The collaborative roles of designer, architect, engineer, contractor, facilities manager, and owner are explored, along with requirements leading to various certifications.

742 Sustainable Studio I: Residential Environments Studio Credits: 4, No prerequisites

This design studio focuses on the task of creating a sustainable residential interior. Working in teams, each group will design a residential project assigned from a range of typologies: a free standing single-family residence, a residence within a multiple dwelling, a residence created through adaptive reuse, and a residence for special populations such as a dormitory, group home, or assisted living facility.

743 Sustainable Hard Goods Lecture Credits: 2, No prerequisites

This course examines both mass market and custom hard goods, and the methods for determining appropriate choices when designing or selecting hard goods for a sustainable interior. Both natural and manmade materials will be covered, as well as finishing processes. Through research and analysis students will become familiar with new and remanufactured goods, including issues related to sourcing, transportation, and LEED certification.

744 Applied Principles for Sustainable Lighting Lecture Credits: 2, No prerequisites

This course covers the application of lighting principles to create project documentation encompassing lighting sources and controls. Utilizing their current studio projects, students will create lighting layouts, zoning diagrams, luminaire schedules, and controls specifications including code and certification requirements.

28  •  New York School of Interior Design  •  Academic Catalog 2020/2021

749 Environmental Systems for the Sustainable Interior Lecture Credits: 2, No prerequisites

This course covers the methodologies for determining and maintaining comfortable conditions within buildings and focuses on efficient performance and systems integration. Students will gain knowledge of various building systems, methods for determining energy use, and the factors that contribute to a comfortable and sustainable interior. Case studies where students assess the success of various theoretical concepts and applications are included.

752 Sustainable Studio II— Contract Environments Studio Credits: 4, Prerequisites: 725 AND 726

This design studio focuses on the challenge of designing a sustainable contract interior. Working in teams, each group will choose a different contract project type such as corporate, institutional, healthcare, hospitality, and retail.


Course & Credit Listing The following is a complete list of courses (at the time of publication). Number of credits is listed in parentheses after the course title. See course schedules available before the beginning of each semester for current offerings.

243 History of the Interior Design Profession in America (2) DH

344 Exhibition Design (2)

270 Topics in World Literature (3)

358 Healthcare Facilities (2)

271 Environmental Science (2)

370 Historic Preservation (2)

275 The Dwelling from a Global Perspective (2) DH

399 Architectural Photography in the Urban Landscape (2)

UNDERGRADUATE COURSES

287 History of American Building Materials & Technology (2) DH

General Education (Liberal Arts, Art & Design History)

276 The Dwelling in the West (2) DH

299 Domestic Study Travel (2) DH

011 Pre-College Art & Design Intensive I: Color (0)

317 Topics in Non-Western Art & Design (2) DH

012 Pre-College Art & Design Intensive II: Line, Shape, Form(0)

323 China: Design and Decorative Arts (2) DH

013 Pre-College Art & Design Intensive III: Pattern (0)

326 History of Urban Form (2) DH

101 Historical Styles I (2) DH 102 Historical Styles II (2) DH

315 History of Building Types (2) DH

318 Design History Seminar (2) DH 325 Landscape Design in History (2) DH

189 Decorative Painting I: Faux Finishes and Gilding (1)

165 Environment & Behavior (2)

118 Custom Carpets (2)

171 Basic Mathematics (2)

119 Textiles for Interiors (2)

175 People, Place, and Culture (2)

166 Art & Antique Appraising I (2)

178 Design as a Second Language (3)

167 Art & Antique Appraising II (2)

185 21st Century Design in New York City (variable)

187 Materials & Methods of Construction (2)

168 Economics of Taste & Style (2)

202 Art & Society II: 19th & 20th Centuries (3)

228 Professional Practice I (2)

203 Humanities I (3)

230 Codes (2)

204 Humanities II (3)

244 Basics of Photography (2)

205 Antique Furniture & Accessories (2) DH

245 Photography for Interior Designers (2)

207 Applied Ethics (1)

262 Advanced Trade Techniques I Custom Upholstery (1)

215 The Beaux Arts Tradition in America (2) DH 216 20th Century Design (2) DH 217 Psychology of Well-Being (1) 222 Arts of China and Japan (2) DH 225 17th & 18th Century Interiors (2) DH 226 18th & 19th Century Ceramics (2) DH

191 Drawing in Situ: New York (2) 194 Systems of Geometric Proportion (1)

196 Decorative Painting IV: Decorative Objects (1)

201 Art & Society I: Pre-19th Century (3)

211 Introduction to the History & Theory of Design (2) DH

190 Decorative Painting II: Stencils & Patterns (1)

195 Decorative Painting III: Murals & Graphics (1)

206 Introduction to Environmental Graphic Design (2)

208 Furnishings & Interiors in America 1700–1810 (2) DH

148 Introduction to Adobe Illustrator (1)

184 Visual Experience & Expression in NYC (3)

160 English Composition II (3)

199 Study Abroad (2) DH

145 Introduction to Adobe InDesign (1)

181 Design Process (2)

117 Pattern Design for Printed Fabric & Wallpaper (2)

151 English Composition I/ESL

142 SketchUp (1)

180 Visual Concepts (2)

Professional & Technical 114 Introduction to Sustainability & the Built Environment (2)

150 English Composition I (3)

141 Color for Interiors (2)

159 Introduction to Virtual Reality (1)

355 Design Theory (2) DH

LECTURES

140 Introduction to Web Page Design (1)

157 Hand Drawing & Rendering I (3)

327 Landscape Design Seminar (2)

112 Modern Architecture & Design II (2) DH

138 Presentation Techniques Using Power Point (1) 139 Introduction to Adobe Photoshop (1)

316 Great Women Designers (2) DH

111 Modern Architecture & Design I (2) DH

132 Construction Documents I (3) 136 Introduction to Revit Architecture (1)

308 Intensive Italian (3) 309 Contemporary Topics in Design (3)

041 Pre-College II (1)

STUDIOS 128 Basic Drafting (3) 134 Residential Design I (3)

306 Intensive French (3)

Note: General Education elective courses denoted with DH satisfy Design History elective requirements

040 Pre-College I (1)

357 Retail Design (2)

197 The Golden Mean as a Design Tool (1) 200 Decorative Painting V: Trompe L’Oeil (1) 231 Kitchen & Bath Design (3) 232 Presentation Techniques I (3) 234 Residential Design II (3) 236 Construction Documents II (3) 238 Portfolio Development (1) 239 Photoshop II (1) 247 Rendering with Markers (2)

263 Advanced Trade Techniques II Custom Flooring (1)

255 Architectural Photography Workshop

264 Advanced Trade Techniques III Custom Wall Treatments (1)

282 Advanced Design Process (2)

265 Advanced Trade Techniques IV Custom Cabinetry (1)

286 Contract Design I (3)

260 Systems of Ornamental Design (2) 283 Lighting I (3) 291 Introduction to Professional Experience (1)

288 Building Systems (2)

292 Presentation Techniques II (3)

289 Structural Concepts (2)

332 Advanced Graphic Communications I (3)

328 Professional Practice II (2)

334 Residential Design III (4)

338 Set Design Seminar (2)

335 Master Class in Residential Design (1) New York School of Interior Design  •  Academic Catalog 22020/2021• 29


Course & Credit Listing

CONT.

339 Advanced Color (2)

GRADUATE COURSES

340 Architectural Woodwork Detailing (3) 364 Mixed Media Rendering (2) 365 Conceptual Sketching I (1)

MFA1

MFA2 LECTURES & SEMINARS 621 Office Design (3)

366 Conceptual Sketching II (1)

LECTURES

368 Watercolor Rendering (1)

501 Historical Styles I (2)

616 History & Theory of Interior Design I: The Classical Tradition (3)

369 Revit for Interior Designers (2)

502 Historical Styles II (2)

647 Sociology of the Domestic Interior (3)

383 Lighting II (3) 384 3ds Max I (1)

514 Introduction to Sustainability in the Built Environment

626 History & Theory of Interior Design II: The Modern Tradition (3)

385 3ds Max II (1)

519 Textiles for Interiors (2)

386 Contract Design II (3)

530 Codes (2)

656 Sociology of the Contemporary Environment (3)

387 Master Class in Contract Design (1)

564 Environment & Behavior (2)

665 History and Theory of Aesthetics (3)

388 Materials and Methods of Decoration (3)

587 Materials & Methods of Construction (2)

392 Presentation Techniques III (3)

601 Modern Architecture & Design I (2)

418 Thesis Preparation (2)

602 Modern Architecture & Design II (2)

432 Advanced Graphic Communications II (2)

617 Building Systems (2)

442 Furniture Design (3)

635 Theory of the Built Environment (2)

476 Contract Design III (3)

641 Interior Design Practice (3)

487 Thesis (4)

STUDIOS

490 Advanced Internship (variable) 500 Advanced Independent Study (variable)

098 MFA-1 Workshop (0) 506 Experiential Learning I (3) 517 Design and Drawing I (2) 527 Design and Drawing II (2) 528 Interior Design Studio I (4) 538 Interior Design Studio II (4) 541 Color for Interiors (2) 606 Experiential Learning II (3) 608 Interior Design Studio III (4)

CORE STUDIOS 640 Design Studio I (6) 650 Design Studio II (6) 660 Directed Thesis Research (3) 670 Thesis Studio (8)

SPECIALTY STUDIOS 612 Product Design (3) 613 Lighting Design (3) 614 Set Design (3) 615 Retail Design (3) 622 Green Design (3) 623 Furniture Design (3) 624 Hospitality Design (3) 625 Exhibition Design (3) 651 Landscape Design (3)

618 Interior Design Studio IV (4)

ELECTIVES

628 Interior Design Studio V (4)

591 Curricular Practical Training (3)

631 Kitchen and Bath Design (3)

601 Modern Architecture & Design I (2)

633 Lighting I (3)

602 Modern Architecture & Design II (2)

634 Advanced Detailing (2)

680 Independent Study (variable)

636 Construction Documents (3)

690 Advanced Internship (variable)

639 Advanced Graphic Communications (3) 642 MFA-1 Thesis Preparation (2) 643 Lighting II (3) 644 Furniture Design (3) 648 MFA-1 Thesis (4)

ELECTIVES 526 Hand Drawing & Rendering Techniques (2) 591 Introduction to Professional Experience (1) 680 Independent Study (variable) 690 Advanced Internship (variable)

30  •  New York School of Interior Design  •  Academic Catalog 2020/2021


MPS Healthcare Interior Design

MPS Lighting Design

MPS Sustainable Interior Environments

LECTURES & SEMINARS

LECTURES & SEMINARS

710 Survey of Healthcare Environments (3)

709 Lighting Exploration Intensive (1)

LECTURES & SEMINARS

711 Introduction to Healthcare Design Research (3)

723 Health Factors of Lighting and Daylighting (2) 724 History of Lighting in New York City (2)

725 History and Theory of Sustainability in the Interior Environment (2)

712 The Business of Healthcare (3)

727 Science of Light (2)

726 Fundamentals of Sustainable Design (2)

715 History and Theory of Healthcare (3)

729 Lighting Design Process (2)

728 Sustainable Interior Design Process (2)

719 Materials, Textiles, and Furnishings for Healthcare Settings (3)

732 Rendering and Representation for Lighting Design (2)

733 Sustainable Soft Goods (2)

721 Applied Research Methods (3)

737 Light Source Selection and Evaluation (2)

722 Building Systems for Healthcare (3)

741 Luminaire Design (2)

731 Programming for Healthcare Environments (3)

745 Retail, Art, and Exhibition Lighting (2)

STUDIOS 720 Healthcare Studio I (3) 730 Healthcare Studio II (3)

746 Lighting Control and Systems Technology (2) 759 The Business of Light (2)

STUDIOS 735 Lighting Design Studio III (2) 739 Lighting Design Studio I (3) 750 Lighting Design Studio II (4)

734 Principles of Sustainable Lighting for Interiors (2) 736 Materials and Finishes for the Sustainable Interior (2) 738 Constructing the Green Interior (2) 743 Sustainable Hard Goods (2) 744 Applied Principles for Sustainable Lighting (2) 748 Maintaining the Green Interior (2) 749 Environmental Systems for the Sustainable Interior (2)

STUDIOS 742 Sustainable Studio I— Residential Environments (4) 752 Sustainable Studio II— Contract Environments (4)

New York School of Interior Design  •  Academic Catalog 2020/2021  • 31


Program Level Learning Objectives Basic Interior Design Certificate (BID) Basic Interior Design Certificate Online (BIDD) The BID/BIDD program goals are aligned with those of the AAS/BFA. The BID/BIDD program’s educational goals include: ¡ Providing foundational knowledge in 2D and 3D art, color, and design skills ¡ Providing foundational knowledge of the history of architecture, interiors, and the decorative arts

¡ Introducing students to basic hand and digital drafting and graphic communication skills. ¡ Emphasizing thinking conceptually, designing creatively, and understanding how to apply conceptual and creative

designs to real situations ¡ Learning the basics of furniture, textiles, finishes, and accessories selection ¡ Learning the basic concepts of space planning and furniture layouts

Associate in Applied Science in Interior Design (AAS) Associate in Applied Science in Interior Design Online (AASD) The AAS/AASD program is structured to fulfill pre-professional level preparation of students. The AAS program’s educational goals include: ¡ Providing an array of liberal arts courses and design history courses and educating students who are culturally, socially, and historically aware

¡ Emphasizing thinking conceptually, designing creatively, and understanding how to apply conceptual and creative designs to real situations

¡ Educating students who can present their ideas through verbal and written communications skills

¡ Emphasizing awareness of code requirements, technical aspects of interior design practice, universal design, accessibility, and sustainability

32  •  New York School of Interior Design  •  Academic Catalog 2020/2021

¡ Educating students with effective graphic communication skills and technical proficiency ¡ Preparing graduates to grow with the profession, with an awareness of the value and necessity of lifelong learning


Bachelor of Fine Arts in Interior Design (BFA) Bachelor of Fine Arts in Interior Design Online (BFAD) The BFA program is structured to fulfill professional level preparation of students. The BFA program’s educational goals include: ¡ Educating students who are culturally, socially, and historically aware ¡ Educating students who can present their ideas through verbal and written communications skills

¡ Emphasizing thinking conceptually, designing creatively, and understanding how to apply conceptual and creative designs to real world situations ¡ Emphasizing awareness of code requirements, technical aspects of interior design practice, universal design, accessibility, and sustainability

¡ Educating students with effective graphic communication skills and technical proficiency ¡ Preparing graduates to grow with the profession, with an awareness of the value and necessity of lifelong learning

New York School of Interior Design  •  Academic Catalog 22020/2021• 33


Program Level Learning Objectives

CONT.

Master of Fine Arts in Interior Design (MFA1) Upon completion of the program, MFA1 students are expected to: ¡ Understand and participate in the complete sequence of an interior design project, from ideation and conceptualization through visualization, presentation, and implementation ¡ Complete design projects representing a variety of scales and types that successfully negotiate the demand for meaningful aesthetic experience with the fulfillment of technical and programmatic requirements ¡ Analyze, select, and apply materials, products, fixtures, and furnishings based on their sensory properties, performance criteria, environmental impact, and life

cycle properties ¡ Reflect on, and analyze, the social, historical, cultural, and economic factors which impact interior design ¡ Understand that the practice of interior design requires sensitivity to, and empathy for, stakeholders of varied cultures, abilities, and beliefs ¡ Demonstrate the organizational, communication, and analytic skills required for design leadership in interior design practice and education, in written, oral, and graphic forms

¡ Recognize the impact of materials, construction methods, building systems, building codes, and legal regulations on the design of the interior, and their effects on sustainable, human-environment interaction ¡ Be familiar with the business, legal, financial, managerial, and ethical considerations of interior design practice

Master of Fine Arts in Interior Design (MFA2) Upon completion of the program, MFA2 students will demonstrate advanced professional competency in interior design through their ability to: ¡ Articulate, investigate, and resolve advanced problems in design, with originality and elaboration

¡ Achieve graduate-level competence in organization, evaluation, interpretation, and presentation of research

¡ Understand the theoretical and practical fundamentals of related design disciplines and interior design specializations, with emphasis on their interdisciplinary connections

¡ Reflect on and analyze the ways in which sociological, economic, cultural, and political factors have affected interior design in the past, and their continuing impact on the discipline

¡ Skillfully and logically present an aesthetic idea in clear verbal, written, and graphic forms

34  •  New York School of Interior Design  •  Academic Catalog 2020/2021

¡ Demonstrate the proficient use of the representational techniques and tools commonly used in the professional practice of interior design, and the judgment to select the most appropriate to communicate their design intent at each stage of the design process. ¡ Select and apply materials, products, fixtures, and furnishings based on their properties and performance criteria, with special attention to their environmental impact.


Master of Professional Studies in Healthcare Interior Design (MPSH) Graduates of the MPS in Healthcare Interior Design are prepared to: ¡ Consider healthcare design from the perspectives of all stakeholders – patients, medical and administrative professionals, caregivers, designers, and the larger society ¡ Appreciate and practice strategies to seek out design research, evaluate it, and synthesize it to inform and strengthen design practice ¡ Understand how research, design theory and practice, history and culture, and their interactions, shape individual and collective views of health and wellness

¡ Understand the role of programming and planning in design and how that knowledge can foster collaboration with planning teams to develop healthcare environments that achieve design excellence, improve patient experience, staff satisfaction, and operational goals. ¡ Understand elements of healthcare design from the designers’ perspective, including the role of research in healthcare design, healthcare project typologies, design and consultant team structures, project design processes, and focused marketing ¡ Understand and/or design residential and contract interior environments through informed architectural and decorative decisions that will support patient satisfaction and staff productivity

Sours: https://issuu.com/nysid/docs/nysidcatalog_20_21

Student Handbook 2020–2021 (November 24, 2020)


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MESSAGE FROM THE PRESIDENT Dear NYSID Student, This publication is the product of many individuals within the College who are working hard to ensure that your time at NYSID is spent in an environment devoted to your success. We are committed to providing you with the opportunities to pursue your creative and academic interests in an atmosphere that is conducive to teaching and learning. The Student Handbook is a demonstration of these principles and contains important information on the services the College provides as well as measures developed to guarantee them. As a student at NYSID, you have rights and responsibilities that we would like you to become familiar with. The College assures these rights while expecting you to fulfill your responsibilities by taking ownership of your education, and knowing our College’s policies and procedures on academic programs and student life as articulated in this handbook and the Academic Catalog. They are designed to help you understand what you can expect of NYSID and what NYSID expects of you. If you hav0e any questions I urge you to contact the appropriate staff member or administrator. New York School of Interior Design is a unique community. Our size is such that familiarity is natural and mutual respect is the standard. This, combined with a stellar education, is what makes the College the force that it is. On behalf of the faculty, staff, administration, and the Board of Trustees, I wish you success as we work toward providing you with the best education in an atmosphere of understanding and civility. Sincerely, David Sprouls, President

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TABLE OF CONTENTS GENERAL INFORMATION .................................................................................................................... 5 Academic calendar......................................................................................................................................... 5 NYSID Directory.............................................................................................................................................. 7 Hours and Facilities ........................................................................................................................................ 8 STUDENT LIFE .................................................................................................................................. 16 Student Clubs ............................................................................................................................................... 16 Student Support Services............................................................................................................................. 18 Disabilities Services ...................................................................................................................................... 19 Career & Internship Services ....................................................................................................................... 20 Student Design Competitions ...................................................................................................................... 21 Counseling.................................................................................................................................................... 21 SAFETY & SECURITY.......................................................................................................................... 24 Reporting Criminal Actions or Emergencies ................................................................................................ 24 Emergency & Evacuation Procedures .......................................................................................................... 26 Crime Statistics ............................................................................................................................................ 27 Title IX .......................................................................................................................................................... 27 Drug-Free School Amendment .................................................................................................................... 30 STUDENT CODE OF CONDUCT ........................................................................................................... 33 Violations ..................................................................................................................................................... 33 Judicial Procedures ...................................................................................................................................... 34 Filing of Allegations/Incident ....................................................................................................................... 34 Review of Complaints & Hearings ............................................................................................................... 35 Appeals ........................................................................................................................................................ 36 Sanctions ...................................................................................................................................................... 36 ADMINISTRATIVE STUDENT SERVICES ............................................................................................... 39 Office of the Registrar .................................................................................................................................. 39 FERPA ........................................................................................................................................................... 43 Office of the Bursar ...................................................................................................................................... 46 Financial Aid Office ...................................................................................................................................... 47

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Office of Admissions .................................................................................................................................... 50 OFFICE OF ACADEMIC AFFAIRS .................................................................................................................... 52 Accreditation & Consumer Information ...................................................................................................... 53 ACADEMIC POLICIES ......................................................................................................................... 55 Attendance .................................................................................................................................................. 55 Registration & Enrollment ........................................................................................................................... 57 Withdrawal from College / Leave of Absence ............................................................................................. 58 Independent Study ...................................................................................................................................... 59 Transfer Credit ............................................................................................................................................. 59 Placement Tests ........................................................................................................................................... 61 Transcripts ................................................................................................................................................... 62 Minimum Residency Requirements............................................................................................................. 62 Retention of Student Work.......................................................................................................................... 64 Student Evaluation of Courses & Faculty .................................................................................................... 65 GRADING DESCRIPTIONS & STANDARDS ........................................................................................... 66 Grade Appeals .............................................................................................................................................. 68 Academic Suspension & Dismissal ............................................................................................................... 69 Graduation Procedures ................................................................................................................................ 71 ACADEMIC INTEGRITY CODE............................................................................................................. 72 Plagiarism ..................................................................................................................................................... 73 ACADEMIC PROGRESS ...................................................................................................................... 75 ACADEMIC PROBATION.................................................................................................................... 76 ACADEMIC JUDICIAL PROCEDURES ................................................................................................... 77 GENERAL POLICIES & RESOURCES ..................................................................................................... 81 Solicitation, Distribution of Literature ......................................................................................................... 81 Reproduction of Student Work & Images ................................................................................................... 81 Personal Property ........................................................................................................................................ 81 School Property ........................................................................................................................................... 82 Lockers & Storage Pedestals ........................................................................................................................ 82 Community Resources ................................................................................................................................. 87

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INTRODUCTION The purpose of this handbook is to provide a guide to life at the New York School of Interior Design. NYSID is committed to providing an educational environment that is both challenging and of the highest quality; the rules and regulations set forth in this handbook are designed to support those goals. Your participation in all areas of student life at NYSID is encouraged. A student’s attendance at the College constitutes an agreement with the College to abide by the standards and regulations expressed in the Student Handbook and the Academic Catalog. Students are responsible for knowing the information contained in these publications. Failure to read either publication does not excuse students from the requirements of the policies and procedures of NYSID. Each student is responsible at all times for knowing her/his own standing in reference to the published academic policies, regulations, and standards of the College. Policies specified in this publication are effective as of the date of publication and supersede those published previously. The College reserves the exclusive right to change any policies or provisions contained in this publication without prior notice and to comply with any applicable law, rule, or regulation. Updates are found on the NYSID website and Portal.

MISSION STATEMENT New York School of Interior Design’s singular focus is to provide the most innovative, immersive, and transformative interior design education in the world.

VISION STATEMENT The most beautiful, inspiring, and human-centered spaces that enable all people to flourish are designed by those who have studied at the New York School of Interior Design.

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GENERAL INFORMATION Academic Calendar 2020–2021 Summer 2020 Monday, April 6 ........................................................................................ Summer 2020 registration begins Wednesday, May 14 .................................................................... Late registration for Summer 2020 begins Monday, June 1................................................. Last day for 100% tuition refund for Summer 2020 courses Monday, June 8.............................................................................................. Summer 2020 semester begins Thursday, June 11 ....................................................................................... Last day to add Summer courses Thursday, June 11 ........................................................ Last day for 75% tuition refund for Summer courses Thursday, June 18 ........................................................ Last day for 50% tuition refund for Summer courses Thursday, June 25 ...................................................................................... Last day to drop Summer courses Thursday, June 25 ........................................................ Last day for 25% tuition refund for Summer courses Wednesday, July 1 ................................................Last day for voluntary withdrawal from Summer courses Saturday, July 4 .............................................................................................. Independence Day (no classes) Thursday, July 30 ..............................................................................................Summer 2020 semester ends Fall 2020 Monday, June 1................................................................................................. Fall 2020 registration begins Thursday, July 15 ..................................................................................Late registration for Fall 2020 begins Monday, August 31 ................................................... Last day for 100% tuition refund for Fall 2020 courses Tue-Thurs, September 1–3 ...................................................................................... New student orientation Monday, September 7 .....................................................................................................................Labor Day Tuesday, September 8 ........................................................................................... Fall 2020 semester begins Monday, September 14 ....................................................... Last day for 75% tuition refund for Fall courses Monday, September 21 ....................................................... Last day for 50% tuition refund for Fall courses Monday, September 21 ...................................................................................... Last day to add Fall courses Tuesday, September 29 ..................................................................................... Last day to drop Fall courses Tuesday, September 29 ....................................................... Last day for 25% tuition refund for Fall courses Monday, September 28 ............................................................................................ Yom Kippur (no classes) Monday, October 28 ..................................................... Last day for voluntary withdrawal from Fall courses

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Wednesday, November 25 ............................................... Thanksgiving recess begins (no EVENING classes) Thurs–Sun, November 26–29 .....................................................................Thanksgiving holiday (no classes) Monday, December 21 ............................................................................................. Fall 2020 semester ends Spring 2021 Monday, November 9 ...................................................................................Spring 2021 Registration begins Thursday, December 17 ................................................................... Late registration for Spring 2021 begins Monday, January 11.....................................................................................Last day for 100% tuition refund Thursday, January 14 .............................................................................................. New Student Orientation Monday, January 18..................................................................... Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Day (no classes) Tuesday, January 19.......................................................................................... Spring 2021 semester begins Monday, January 25........................................................................................ Last day to add Spring courses Monday, January 25.........................................................Last day for 75% tuition refund for Spring courses Monday, February 1.........................................................Last day for 50% tuition refund for Spring courses Monday, February 8.........................................................Last day for 25% tuition refund for Spring courses Monday, February 8...................................................................................... Last day to drop Spring courses Monday, February 15 ......................................................................................... President’s Day (no classes) Monday–Sunday, March 8–16 .................................................................................................... Spring Break Monday, March 17................................................... Last day for voluntary withdrawal from Spring courses Saturday–Sunday, April 3–4............................................................................... Easter weekend (no classes) Monday, May 10 .................................................................................................. Spring 2021 semester ends

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NYSID Directory General Telephone Number ......................................................................................................212.472.1500 Toll Free Line ............................................................................................................................. 800-33-NYSID 70th Street Lobby Reception .............................................................................................................. Ext. 410 69th Street Lobby Reception .............................................................................................................. Ext. 409 Fax ............................................................................................................................................. 212-472-3800 Website ............................................................................................................................................ nysid.edu NYSID Portal .......................................................................................................................... portal.nysid.edu Administrative Offices Location: 69 Street Building ...................................................................................................... 212-472-1500 Admissions .......................................................................................................................................... Ext. 205 Financial Aid ........................................................................................................................................ Ext. 204 International Students ........................................................................................................................ Ext. 203 Dean of Students ................................................................................................................................ Ext. 202 Registrar .............................................................................................................................................. Ext. 209 Bursar .................................................................................................................................................. Ext. 218 Academic Affairs ................................................................................................................................. Ext. 304 External Relations ............................................................................................................................... Ext. 432 President ............................................................................................................................................. Ext. 402 Administrative Offices Location: 70 Street Building ...................................................................................................... 212-472-1500 Career & Internship Services .............................................................................................................. Ext. 308 Library ................................................................................................................................................. Ext. 214 Bookstore ............................................................................................................................................ Ext. 418 Development ...................................................................................................................................... Ext. 431 Information Technology ..................................................................................................................... Ext. 764 Facilities/Security ................................................................................................................................ Ext. 420

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Hours & Facilities 2020–2021: Safety and Flexibility in Unprecedented Times NYSID’s community has never faced a challenge on the scale of COVID-19, and we know that our school, our community, and the rest of the world, are not yet free from the risks associated with Coronavirus. Knowing this, we must maintain our commitment to an exceptional learning experience for every person who interacts with NYSID, and our plans to return for the 2020-2021 academic year attempt to blend this commitment to excellence with a commitment to health and safety, and weave in the flexibility that will be required as we navigate an academic year like no other. The Return to Campus site was launched on August 5, 2020. We will update these pages with important new information, messages to our campus, and further details as they become available. Please check back frequently. For enrolled students, faculty, and staff, please check your NYSID.edu email address often for timely updates. Daily Symptom Self-Screening Required for Employees and Students All individuals will be required to complete a symptom self-check every day before they enter campus premises. This self-check asks certain screening questions about the individual’s health, including, among other items, whether the individual is experiencing symptoms of COVID-19 or has been notified of exposure to COVID-19. Building Access & Hours Students The NYSID ID must be presented and scanned upon entering all buildings and should be carried whenever on school property. Only registered students bearing current ID cards and authorized visitors are permitted access to campus facilities. Refusal to present one’s ID card upon request by NYSID authorized personnel will result in immediate removal from the premises. ID cards may be obtained through the Office of the Registrar on the second floor of the 69th Street building. NYSID Uptown Buildings Due to security requirements, students are not permitted to bring family members, friends, or pets to any area of the College without written consent from NYSID Office of Academic Affairs, [email protected] All visitors must present a valid form of identification and sign in at the reception desk to gain access to school facilities. A visitor tag must be displayed at all times while on campus. If written consent is granted, guests will only be permitted between 9am and 5pm during open hours of operation for the following areas: 69th Street Gallery and NYSID Café. Students must accompany their guest at all times. Guests are not permitted in any classroom, Library, Atelier or rooftop areas. All visits should be limited to no more than one hour. Students who violate this policy will be subject to disciplinary action. (Students should allow at least 48 business hours for the processing of any requests, excluding weekends).

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70 Street Building Fall & Spring Semesters Monday–Friday ............................................................................................................................. 8am–10pm Saturday & Sunday.......................................................................................................................... 8am–8pm Summer Session Monday–Thursday ........................................................................................................................8am–10 pm Fridays in June & July ......................................................................................... 9am–2pm, Closed Sat & Sun Building hours are subject to change and will vary when classes are not in session. Updates are posted on the NYSID Portal. NYSID Library Due to COVID-19, the Library is open with modified hours and services in fall 2020. Please consult library.nysid.edu for more up-to-date information. Fall & Spring Semesters Monday–Friday ............................................................................................................................... 9am–9pm Saturday ........................................................................................................................................ 10am–6pm Sunday ................................................................................................................................................12–8pm Summer & Holidays Refer to nysid.edu for up-to-date hours information. NYSID 69 Street Gallery Due to COVID-19, the 69th Street Gallery is functioning temporarily as a study space and lounge for students. Fall & Spring semesters Tuesday–Saturday......................................................................................................................... 11am–6pm Summer Monday–Thursday ........................................................................................................................ 10am–5pm NYSID 69 Street Administrative Offices September–May Monday–Friday ............................................................................................................................... 9am–5pm June Monday–Thursday .......................................................................................................................... 9am–5pm Friday .............................................................................................................................................. 9am–2pm

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July & August Monday–Thursday ................................................................................................. 9am–5pm, Closed Fridays NYSID Graduate Center Fall Semester Monday–Friday ................................................................................................................... 8:15am–midnight Saturdays & Sundays ...................................................................................................................... 9am–6pm Spring Semester Monday–Friday ................................................................................................................... 8:15am–midnight Saturdays & Sundays ...................................................................................................................... 9am–6pm Summer Monday–Thursday ................................................................................................................... 8:15am–10pm Friday (June).................................................................................................................................... 9am–2pm Friday (July) ..................................................................................................................................... 9am–5pm Closed Saturdays & Sundays Building hours are subject to change and will vary when classes are not in session. Updates are posted on the NYSID Portal. Students may enter using all entrances to the Graduate Center and via the stairwell to the 3rd floor through the Park Avenue lobby only. Graduate Center Visitors: Due to security requirements, students are not permitted to bring family members, friends, or pets to any area of the Graduate Center without written consent from NYSID Office of Academic Affairs, [email protected] All visitors must present a valid form of identification and sign in at the reception desk to gain access to school facilities. A visitor tag must be displayed at all times while on campus. If written consent is granted, guests will only be permitted between 9am and 5pm. Students must accompany their guest at all times. All visits should be limited to no more than one hour. Students who violate this policy will be subject to disciplinary action. (Students should allow at least 48 business hours for the processing of any requests, excluding weekends).

Extended Building Hours Building hours are extended during the final two weeks of the fall and spring school semesters to give students additional hours of access. Hours may vary from building to building. Students should check the NYSID Portal for details. Notices will also be posted around campus. Hours of operation are subject to change. Please refer to the website/portal for updated information.

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Emergency Closings In case of inclement weather or an emergency, NYSID will notify the NYSID community via e-mail and/or text message. Weekend classes may be closed due to inclement weather or emergencies. Closings can also be checked on the NYSID website or by calling the main NYSID number at 212-472-1500.

The Galleries at New York School of Interior Design Due to COVID-19, the 69th Street Gallery is functioning temporarily as a study space and lounge for students. There are no exhibitions scheduled for fall 2020. The College operates a gallery at 161 East 69th street on the ground floor. The NYSID Gallery is open to the public and presents professional exhibitions on topics related to interior design, architecture, and the history of the decorative arts as well as student thesis exhibitions. The Graduate Center also presents graduate thesis exhibitions, viewed by appointment only.

Roof Terrace The roof terrace of the 70th Street building can be used as a location for studio classes and can also serve as a place to study, have lunch, or hold informal gatherings.

Whiton Student Center The Whiton Student Center, named for the founder of the College, Sherrill Whiton, is located on the lower level of the 70th Street building. The space is periodically used for events, exhibitions of student work, and critiques for design studio classes.

Student Lounge & Café The cafe will be closed for the fall 2020 semester. Both the 69th Street gallery and the auditorium have been converted into temporary student lounges and study spaces.

Library Due to COVID-19, the NYSID Library is operating on an appointment-only and “call” system during the fall 2020 semester. Electronic resources for research have been greatly expanded. The materials resource collection is closed to all users until further notice to prevent the spread of the COVID-19 virus. The Library has implemented online chat and email reference services via the library homepage.Visit library.nysid.edu for more information" The NYSID Library, located in the 70th Street building, provides library services for all current NYSID students and faculty. In addition to approximately 15,000 volumes of books and magazines, the library acquires a wide range of online resources, including a growing collection of electronic journals and books. The library has three full-time and one part-time librarians providing research assistance to students and faculty. Books and magazines are international in scope, covering historical and contemporary aspects of interior design, architecture, decorative and fine arts.

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The library maintains a website at library.nysid.edu from which users can link to the online catalog, BobCat, to find titles in the library’s collections. The library website provides access to online research guides as well as electronic databases that contain both full-text journal articles and high-resolution images. Librarians at NYSID offer orientation and library instruction sessions throughout the school year for classes, including project-specific search guidance and joint instruction sessions with the Writing Center. The library staff creates online “LibGuides” for students and faculty to assist with using the extensive collections in the library. The Library also created and maintains an online library instruction course on Canvas. You can enroll yourself to the course and follow the modules to learn about the resources and services in the library. The library maintains subscriptions to the following online resources: Art and Architecture Source: A database covering a broad range of art-related subjects, from fine, decorative and commercial art, to various areas of architecture and architectural design. Providing over 600 full-text journals, more than 220 full-text books, and a collection of over 63,000 images. ARTstor: a database of more than 1.5 million art and architectural images. Avery Index: A survey of more than 2,500 U. S. and foreign journals covering the current literature of architecture and design. Building Green: a site that provides accurate, unbiased, and timely information designed to help building-industry professionals and policy makers improve environmental performance. Gale Databases: The premier source for peer-revised, full-text articles from the world’s leading journals and reference sources, including millions of articles and full coverage of The New York Times. ARTstor: a database of more than 1.5 million art and architectural images. E-books: a growing number of e-books can be researched through the library’s subscriptions to Bloomsbury Fairchild Interior Design Library, Credo Reference, Ebook Central, or Ebsco’s e-book collections. JSTOR: a database that contains full text articles of more than 150 scholarly journals. MADCAD: A licensed code resource, including the International Building Code 2015; the NYC Administrative Code: Building Code and Construction Codes, 2014; the NYS Uniform Code Supplement 2017; and the IES Lighting Handbook. Materials Connexion: a database of advanced, innovative and sustainable materials and processes with descriptions of the materials and manufacturer’s contact information. The library maintains an auction catalog collection located in the Mario Buatta Materials Atelier. Magazines and journals are maintained in the library for the past three years, with older issues in storage and available to students by request from the information desk. The library maintains the Materials and Products Literature Collections, which can be found in two locations: the Mario Buatta Materials Atelier in the 70th Street building and the Ruth and C.J. Trimble Materials Collection in the Graduate Center. Students have full access to the books, magazines, and materials of the NYSID library and a wider range of libraries in New York. NYSID students and faculty may use their NYSID ID cards to borrow books and

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use the collections at New York University’s Bobst Library; the New School’s University Center Library; and the Cooper Union Library. The library is a member of a consortium that allows student access to more than 250 libraries in New York City with a METRO pass, available on request at the library information desk. The library maintains a full-color scanner. Scanning is free and available on a first-come, first- served basis. Students can follow the instructions posted on the library website for using the scanner and printing copies via the NYSID computer network. Undergraduate students may check out up to 10 books at a time, while graduate students may borrow up to 25. The loan period for books is 28 days, and fines will be accrued after that time if the book is not renewed or returned. Books may be renewed online for an additional period of 28 days. Audiovisual materials may not be renewed. Students maintaining a fine of $5 or more may not borrow until the fine is reduced. Fines for undergraduate and graduate students are 25 cents per day, $1 per hour for reserves, and $1 per day for recalled books and audiovisual materials. The fee for a lost book is $105. It will be used for replacement and processing. Any unpaid amounts are subject to collection by an outside agency. Fines and fees totaling more than $20 will result in a registration block at NYSID. Students who borrow books from consortium libraries are subject to the borrowing policies, fines, and charges of those institutions. Any destructive act toward books, magazines and other library property such as writing on or removing pages and images is subject to replacement fines and possible disciplinary sanctions, including dismissal from the College.

Mario Buatta Materials Atelier The Mario Buatta Materials Atelier, located on the second floor of the 70th Street building adjacent to the library, provides workspace for students. It is furnished with drafting tables, computer workstations, plotters, and printers that are connected to the NYSID computer network. Also located in the Atelier is the Materials Library, where students can find product binders, auction catalogs, and materials samples including textiles, tile, wood, and glass.

Lighting Lab Located at 70th Street building and 401 Park Avenue South, the lighting lab contains examples of current technology in lamps, luminaires, and lighting controls and serves as both a teaching facility and a place where students may test lighting concepts for design projects.

Computer Facilities NYSID maintains a wide range of computer technology for student use. The Mario Buatta Materials Atelier is equipped with computers designated for student use, and the library provides workstations for research purposes. These computers are available on a first-come, first-served basis. Additionally, when there is no class in session, computers located in classrooms may be used by students. NYSID provides Wi-Fi access for students with a student ID and password in both the 70th Street building and at the Graduate Center. NYSID Wi-Fi access is for school-related work only. Downloading music, videos, or other non-school-related information is prohibited. Users will be automatically logged out of the system after a period of inactivity.

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In the Graduate Center, there are computer workstations at every student desk. NYSID is not responsible for personal laptops and/or hardware/software compatibility. Any hardware directly connected to the NYSID network must be approved by the IT department prior to usage. Printers and plotters and scanners for student use are maintained at both the 70th Street building and the Graduate Center. All hardware that has a scanner connected to it is also equipped with a DVD writer. Students are asked to coordinate printing times with each other especially during high-volume hours. NYSID encourages students to maintain a schedule to reserve printing times. Special paper may be used only on the designated plotters and printers at designated times, which are posted near the output devices.

Academic Computing and IT Policies NYSID computer facilities are available for use by all currently registered students for course-related work only. The sharing of student accounts is prohibited and may result in disciplinary action. When not scheduled for use by a class, classroom workstations may be used for independent work. Students may not store personal files on the network or use computer facilities for work unrelated to their classes. Student accounts are electronically monitored for potential abuse. A student account cannot be transferred, loaned, or rented to others. Offenders will lose computer privileges, be responsible for any costs incurred by the abuse of privileges, and may be subject to disciplinary action up to and including dismissal. NYSID is not responsible for files erased, damaged, or stolen. NYSID is not responsible for student computer hardware or cell phones. NYSID is not responsible for files stored on NYSID computers. It is each student’s responsibility to make backup copies of files on removable media. Tampering with the setup and/or configuration of hardware, duplication of copyrighted materials, or the installation of software or hardware on school equipment is prohibited and may result in disciplinary action. NYSID does not endorse or permit copyright infringement of software, music, or other intellectual property, and any infringement of copyright in violation of state and federal laws will result in the loss of computer privileges and may result in dismissal from the College. Peer to peer file sharing is not permitted. The download of sexually explicit material or the sending of threatening email or information through the NYSID computer network will not be tolerated and may result in the loss of computer privileges and dismissal from the College. Registration and Technology Fees All students who register for academic courses at NYSID must pay the technology fee at the time of registration. This fee covers the administrative cost of registration and provides students with access to technology at the College. Printing Credits Every semester, each student is issued a number of print credits, from which the cost of individual prints is deducted. Students may use their NYSID ID number to log into the portal to view their available print credits and usage. When a student uses more than their allotted printing credit, the student will have the option of purchasing additional printing credits. No refunds for unused printing allowances will be made for any reason, including graduation, withdrawal from the College, leave of absence, or dismissal.

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Archiving Student Accounts All computer accounts are archived two weeks after the end of the semester, including the summer session. Please see “NYSID Semester Timeline” for more information found on the NYSID portal under Technology Services. All digital files are archived at that time. Students can fill out an Application for Retrieval of Archived Student Data found under Technology Services on NYSID's portal, or may contact the Technology department at https://helpdesk.nysid.edu. Students are responsible for transferring or saving their files prior to the end of each semester. Model Shop Both the Graduate Center and the 70th Street building have fully-equipped model shops that provide access to technology needed for model construction. Tables with cutting mats are available as well as a laser cutter. Training workshops are provided to assist students in becoming proficient in the use of the laser cutter.

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STUDENT LIFE We believe it is important to nurture your life both inside and outside the classroom and all NYSID students are encouraged to participate in student life. Activities and events revolve around socializing and fun, exploring New York City as well as enhancing life as a professional designer through group trips, visits behind-the-scenes at designer showrooms and guest lectures. The Student Events and Activities Calendar is posted on the NYSID Portal and the NYSID website. Notices will also be posted throughout the campus and on the student activities bulletin boards in the Mario Buatta Materials Atelier and at the Graduate Center. NYSID has active student organizations that support diverse interests, promote student involvement and encourage leadership opportunities to explore and develop skills to assist beyond the classroom. These clubs and associations help students connect to each other and the global and local interior design community.

Student Clubs American Society of Interior Designers (ASID) is the oldest and largest professional organization devoted to interior design, with a membership of 30,000. The members of NYSID’s large and active student chapter take tours of residential design firms, hotels, and showrooms, and participate in activities that complement academics and build professional networks. International Interior Design Association (IIDA) a professional organization that perpetuates global collaboration among interior designers. Members of this chapter have the opportunity to compete for awards and scholarships and attend networking events. U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC) supports the Green Design Group (GDG), a student organization promoting sustainable initiatives through professional networking and a common goal to educate the community about creating and maintaining a sustainable environment. One of their ongoing projects is developing a “green rooftop” for NYSID’s 70 Street location. Graduate Student Association represents the interests and needs of the graduate student body by serving as a liaison between students and the NYSID faculty and administration working towards enhancing the overall student experience. They also organize and sponsor events throughout the academic year. Undergraduate Student Association functions as the voice of the student body and is the primary forum through which student concerns are brought to the attention of the College’s administration. They also organize and sponsor events throughout the academic year.

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Personal/Professional Development Programs Lunch & Learn series brings prominent designers, architects, and experts in the field to the campus for intimate discussions with students. Supporting the Whole Designer series teaches the life skills designers need to thrive, from timemanagement to public speaking. Penni Morganstein, PhD, the school’s staff psychologist, curates this series. Health & Wellness Festival is a week of offerings to stimulate visual creativity and relieve stress. Take yoga or meditation, get a massage, or attend a lecture on health-related topics.

Community Service NYSID’s relationships with area nonprofit organizations enable students to share their design skills with those in need and assist with rebuilding struggling communities. NYSID is involved with such organizations as Design Industries Foundation Fighting AIDS (DIFFA), Holiday House, Ronald McDonald House, and New York Cares. For more information regarding student life contact Karen Higginbotham, dean of students, at [email protected]

Housing NYSID student housing, located at 1760 Third Avenue at East 97 Street, is owned and operated by Educational Housing Services, Inc. (EHS). An on-site resident advisor serves as a peer counselor, who facilitates administrative referrals, and maintains behavioral standards set by NYSID and EHS. Housing is open to all students through an application process administered by EHS. For information on housing options contact the Dean of Students Office [email protected]

Student Health Insurance NYSID requires all undergraduate and graduate students taking nine or more credits to be covered by a health insurance plan. Students in Distance Learning programs (BIDD, AASD, MPSD—no courses on campus) programs are not eligible for the plan. Any student who does not already have a health insurance plan will be automatically enrolled in the Consolidated Health Plan Program, a program arranged by the College and administered through University Health Plans, Inc. A brochure outlining benefits may be found online at the University Health Plans’ website universityhealthplans.com under the New York School of Interior Design link. Students who are enrolled in this plan will be billed for single coverage. The rate for the 2020–2021 year is $3,290. This covers the period from 8/27/20– 8/26/21. This is an annual plan; students will be enrolled for both the fall and spring semesters. Any student who already has a health insurance plan that is comparable to the health insurance program offered by the College may choose to waive this coverage. Please be sure that services covered by your current health insurance plan are reasonably accessible in the NYSID area and include lab work, prescription drugs, outpatient hospital services, emergency room care, and hospitalization.

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In order to waive coverage, you must login to the NYSID Portal. A new waiver form must be submitted at the beginning of each academic year. Any student who does not submit a waiver form by the deadline will automatically be enrolled and charged for the full cost of the academic year. Waivers will not be accepted after the deadline. No exceptions or refunds will be granted. If a student’s number of credits drops below nine after the deadline, he/she will still be responsible for the full cost of the academic year. Questions regarding health insurance plan may be directed to the Dean of Students Office.

International Students It is important that international students remain informed of policies and procedures affecting their F1 student visa status. Please refer to the International Student Guide and the international student page on the NYSID Portal for specific guidelines, policies, and procedures to maintain F1 student status. NYSID abides by U.S. government regulations set forth for international students, and information is subject to change without notice. For questions and updates regarding international student matters, contact International Student Services Specialist Luciane Levitt at [email protected]

Student Support Services Academic Advising Students can arrange an appointment with their academic advisor Monday–Friday, 9am–5pm, by calling the Office of Academic Affairs at extension 304 or contacting their advisor directly via email or phone. Students are encouraged to schedule appointments in advance, although every effort is made to accommodate walk-ins. Advisors can direct the student to the appropriate support service at the College. The undergraduate students' academic advisors' offices are located on the third floor of the 69th St. building. The graduate students' academic advisor is located in room 313 at the Graduate Center. Every student is assigned an academic advisor upon initial inquiry and prior to matriculation. Academic advisors are available to guide students as they plan their program of study and to discuss academic issues regarding course content and scheduling, although students are responsible themselves for planning their course of study and ensuring prerequisites are met in a timely fashion. The academic advisor will provide students with an advising checklist and information on how to access their graduation report and course needs list, available on the NYSID Portal, all of which enable the student to track his or her progress through the program. The student should check these reports periodically on the NYSID Portal, especially before each semester’s registration period. Appointments may be made with advisors throughout the school year to review progress through the curriculum and to plan course selections for future semesters. Under no circumstances can students register for a class without having satisfied the prerequisite or co-requisite for the course in question. Academic advisors are not responsible for notifying students that they are in jeopardy of academic probation or dismissal; it is the sole responsibility of the individual student to be aware of their progress and academic standing. Tutoring Tutoring is conducted by advanced students with proven skills and ability in certain subjects to help other students develop related skills. There is no cost to students for tutoring services. Subjects may include drafting and CAD courses.

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The College may not be able to offer tutoring in every course, every semester. Tutoring sessions are held in the Mario Buatta Materials Atelier and at the Graduate Center unless otherwise noted in the schedule; times are posted on the NYSID Portal, in the Atelier, in the Office of Academic Affairs, and on bulletin boards around campus. NYSID tutoring services are on a “drop-in” basis. A typical tutoring session is 15 to 30 minutes long. Students who need greater assistance must arrange for private tutoring off college premises. Private tutoring sessions are prohibited on campus. Writing & Communication Center Due to COVID-19, the Writing and Communication Center is only holding virtual sessions in 2020-2021. The Writing and Communication Center, with locations in the 70th St. library, the Graduate Center, and online, provides students with the opportunity to improve their writing and communication skills for course work across the curriculum. Students are encouraged to make appointments using the NYSID Portal, but they may drop in at any time during the Center hours and work with a staff member, if available. The Writing and Communications Center services are also available for students enrolled in online programs. Services are offered in general writing skills, grammar, pronunciation and public speaking. Special emphasis is placed on writing coherent essays and term papers, creating effective concept statements, and giving effective and professional visual and oral presentations. Specific hours for all locations are posted on the NYSID Portal and on bulletin boards around campus. Disabilities Services The Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) of 1990 and Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1972, protects individuals with disabilities, and guarantees them certain protections and rights to equal access to programs and services. In order to access these rights, an individual must present documentation indicating that the disability substantially limits a major life activity, including learning. The College provides reasonable accommodations to students with documented disabilities. It is the student’s responsibility to provide NYSID’s disability coordinator with written documentation from a qualified professional stating the accommodation requested. Students must comply with all College requests for documentation. Testing and/ or documentation must be less than three years old. Students must provide this documentation no later than one month prior to the start of the semester in which services will be initiated. Students are required to maintain ongoing involvement in securing and implementing accommodations; students are expected to work collaboratively with the disability coordinator, their academic advisor and with their instructors to arrange and implement approved accommodations. The disability coordinator will determine the accommodations based on the student’s documentation as completed by the qualified professional coupled with the stated student needs. Reasonable accommodations are determined on a case-by-case basis and should be evaluated every semester. 26 NYSID is not required to significantly change or alter curriculum, schedules, requirements, attendance policies, or learning expectations to accommodate disabilities. Accommodations are adjustments that facilitate completion of student work. Students are required to meet the academic and technical proficiencies for their respective program, and exams and curricula cannot be modified. In studio-based courses, project deadlines cannot be adjusted and all students regardless of disability will be required to

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meet project and presentation deadlines. More information can be obtained by contacting the disability coordinator in the Office of Academic Affairs at 212-472-1500, x303. Service Animal Policy: A service animal is defined as a dog (an animal) individually and specifically trained to do work or perform tasks for the benefit of an individual with a disability. Examples of the functions of service animals include but are not limited to guiding individuals with impaired vision, alerting and protecting a person who is having a seizure or calming a person with Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) during an anxiety attack. Service animals are working animals, not pets. The work or task a service animal has been trained to provide must be directly related to the person’s disability. Animals whose sole function is to provide comfort or emotional support do not qualify as service animals under the ADA. Requests for service animals must be processed by the disability coordinator in the Office of Academic Affairs. The request must be in writing to Office of Academic Affairs, Disabilities Coordinator, 170 E 70 St, NY, NY 10021 and include: affirmation that the service animal is required due to a disability; a description of the specific tasks or work the animal has been trained to perform; documentation that the service animal is in compliance with all required NY State and NY City requirements associated with licensing, vaccinations, and other health regulations. Career and Internship Services The College employs a full-time career services and internship coordinator, who provides career services for graduates for up to five years after graduation and to current matriculated students. The Office of Career and Internship Services is located on the 70th Street building mezzanine, and may be reached directly at ext. 308 or at [email protected] Students enrolled in the BID or any degree program can make an appointment to have their résumé, cover letter, and portfolio reviewed, as well as obtain assistance in preparing for interviews. The Office of Career and Internship Services maintains an online job board and offers guidance to students and recent graduates as they seek employment. In addition, the Office of Career and Internship Services presents programs of interest throughout the fall and spring semesters at both the Graduate Center and the 70th Street location. Information on the professional NCIDQ (National Council of Interior Design Qualification) certification exam is also available. A wide variety of internships and full-time and part-time paid positions are available that reflect the broad spectrum of opportunities in the interior design profession. A student is granted access to the NYSID Job Board if they are matriculated and have completed 12 credits at NYSID. (This does not include transfer credits from another college). Students who have completed the 12-credit minimum at NYSID can email the career services coordinator at [email protected] to review their application materials prior to accessing the job board. The career services and internship coordinator also organizes an annual Speed Portfolio Review event, in which graduating students from professional programs meet with several professional designers in one evening, to receive feedback on their work and portfolio, and to network for potential employment. Student Design Competition Coordination Students who are interested in submitting a project to a student design competition or scholarship competition should visit the NYSID Portal for listings. These listings can be found under the Welcome to NYSID tab in the New Scholarships & Competitions section. Please note that any scholarship competitions listed here are different from institutional scholarships that are offered through the Office of Admissions. All listings include a link to an external organization, firm, or party. Students should read

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and follow all submission entry rules and guidelines to ensure their projects are in compliance with each individual competition. Some scholarship competitions are by school nomination only; in these cases, the VP for academic affairs/ dean will request project samples and images for evaluation, prior to nomination. The design competition coordinator and the VPAA/dean will work individually with the nominees as they prepare their submittals. For additional information on competitions, contact the student design competition coordinator at x311 in the Office of Academic Affairs. Counseling NYSID offers free counseling to all students. These services, which are provided by a New York Statelicensed psychologist, are confidential, unless harm to self or others is indicated. Counseling is not part of a student’s academic record. The counselor is available to meet with any currently enrolled student for one session to provide information, consultation, and/ or referral. When indicated, students are offered short-term counseling for a variety of concerns, including depression, anxiety, insomnia, relationship and family problems, homesickness and difficulty adjusting to school and life in New York City, grief, academic issues, health problems, or stress due to difficult school/life experiences. Some concerns can be addressed in a few sessions, while others may require additional time and effort. In all cases, the counselor will make every effort to help, or to assist a student in finding help, should a referral be appropriate. Appointments are available, during designated times, September through July when school is in session. Appointments can be scheduled by contacting 212-472-1500 ext. 320 or by emailing [email protected] Drop-in appointments can sometimes be accommodated. A student who cannot attend due to illness or an emergency must call to reschedule. If NYSID counseling is indicated, follow-up sessions will be scheduled after the first visit. If a higher level of care is indicated, a referral to a healthcare provider in the community will be facilitated. One-Time Appointment: One-time visits are available to students who would like to discuss a difficult day or a difficult life problem. Individual Counseling: Individual counseling sessions are specifically designed to offer students shortterm counseling for a variety of concerns. Personal counseling is an opportunity to resolve problems, improve understanding, and learn new management skills. It provides a supportive and confidential environment in which a student can talk openly about concerns and feelings. The student can work to explore their concerns and work toward a better understanding and resolution of difficulties. Thirty-minute weekly sessions are offered to all students with a specified appointment time. Students enrolled in this service must make a weekly commitment until sessions are completed. Study Skills: Some students may experience academic difficulties that adversely impact the realization of their educational goals. Issues that can be the subject of counseling include: procrastination, time management, test anxiety, managing feedback/criticism, writer’s block, public speaking anxiety, fear of failure, perfectionism, difficulty with motivation, and loss of concentration. Any student who feels that these or similar issues are creating concerns or problems related to academic progress should call to make an appointment. Referrals: If a student’s concerns cannot be resolved in the short term or if the student is in need of a higher level of intervention, NYSID counseling can help find options for mental health services or

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specialized services in the community. The counselor will help to find a professional whose services will be covered by the student’s insurance or who has a sliding-fee scale based on income. Workshops: A variety of workshops, such as time management, stress management, are offered throughout the year. Suggestions from students related to workshops are welcome. Crises and Emergencies: Any student in a crisis situation should call 212-472-1500, ext. 320 from September through July to set up an immediate appointment. Appointments are available on Mondays, Tuesdays, and Thursdays. Outside of these hours or if it is an emergency that requires immediate attention, please call 911 or go to the nearest emergency room.

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Additional Support Services: Samaritans Suicide Prevention Hotline 212-673-3000 USA National Suicide Hotlines, toll-free, 24 hours, 7 days a week 1-800-suicide (1-800-784-2433); 1-800-273-talk (1-1800-273-8255) Hearing Impaired Hotline, 1-800-799-4TTY (4889) LIFENET 1-800-LIFENET (1-800-543-3638) A confidential, toll-free help line for New York City residents is operated by the Mental Health Association of New York City (mhaofnyc.org) in partnership with the New York City Department of Health and Mental Services. LIFENET is multilingual and multicultural. 1-877-298-3373 for Spanish speaking callers 1-877-990-8585 for Korean and Chinese (Mandarin and Cantonese) speaking callers 1-212-982-5284 for hearing impaired callers Safe Horizon 1-800-621-HOPE (1-800-621-4673) This organization’s mission is to provide support, prevent violence, and promote justice for victims of crime and abuse, their families, and communities. For more than a quarter of a century Safe Horizon has helped victims of crime and abuse through crises. 1-866-604-5350 For Hearing Impaired callers

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SAFETY & SECURITY Medical Emergencies In the event of any medical emergency, NYSID personnel will call 911 for an ambulance. The nearest lobby receptionist should be notified in case of an emergency so that they can direct EMS to the appropriate location. A student can refuse to be examined by EMS personnel when those personnel arrive on campus. If a student has an existing condition or is on particular medication of which responders should be aware of, it is the student’s responsibility to carry an explanatory medical card with them at all times. In addition, the student may give permission for a copy of this information to be kept on file at the reception desks.

Campus Security At NYSID, the safety and well-being of its students, faculty, staff, and visitors is a high priority. A safe and secure environment can only be achieved through the cooperation of all members of the campus community. The following policies are a part of the College’s efforts to ensure that this collaborative endeavor is effective. Students should read the following information carefully and use the information to help foster a safe environment for the entire NYSID community. Any inquiries regarding the policies may be made to the Campus Safety Office, 212-472-1500, ext. 420. For additional information regarding campus safety and security please refer to the Annual Security Report found at nysid.edu/campussafety-security.

Reporting Criminal Actions or Emergencies Any crimes-in-progress on campus should be reported by dialing 911. Immediately following the 911 call, at the uptown facility the 69 Street or 70 Street reception desk should also be alerted by calling 212-472-1500, ext. 410, or the call can be made from the house phones on the third or fourth floor staircase landings. If needed, Incident Report forms are available at the 70th Street reception desk. Any crime committed on campus or within Manhattan’s 19th Police Precinct may also be reported to the 19th Precinct at 153 East 67th Street (between Lexington and Third Avenues) or by telephoning 212452-0600. Any crimes-in-progress at the Graduate Center should be reported by dialing 911. Immediately following the 911 call, notify the reception desk at the third-floor front entrance. A call can be made from the house phones at the rear entrance on the second and third floors. If needed, Incident Report forms are available at the reception desk. Any crime committed at the Graduate Center or within Manhattan’s 13th Police Precinct may also be reported to the 13th Precinct at 230 East 21st Street or by telephoning 212-477-7411. Criminal actions or other emergencies that occur anywhere on campus may also be reported to Campus Security at 212-472-1500, ext. 410. The College will notify the police precinct. New York School of Interior Design does not have an on-campus residential facility. Students reside at an off-campus facility (1760 Third Avenue) managed by Educational Housing Services (EHS), an

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independent student housing organization. For the 1760 Residence Hall, any incident of assault should be reported to the resident assistant (RA) on duty or the EHS Residence Life Office at the facility. Community members, students, faculty, staff, and guests are encouraged to report all crimes and emergencies in an accurate and prompt manner directly to the NYPD by dialing 911. During normal business hours, we encourage people reporting a crime or emergency to the NYPD to also report the incident, as soon as practicable, to the NYSID’s Campus Safety Office at 212-472-1500 ext. 410 or from an internal College phone by dialing 410 for all NYSID facilities or by filling out an incident report form. In response to a call, the NYPD will take action it deems appropriate, generally either dispatching an officer to the caller’s location or asking the caller to report to the NYPD to file a report. Internal reports involving a student, which are made to NYSID officials as listed above, will be forwarded to the Campus Safety Office and the dean of students. These offices are responsible for reviewing all reports and determining if the case will be referred for adjudication through NYSID’s judicial process. The New York Police Department is responsible for the investigation of any reported crimes and other public safety emergencies. If assistance is required from the New York City Fire Department, such assistance will be sent by the 911 dispatchers after receiving an emergency call. Crimes should be reported to New York City officials and NYSID as described above to ensure inclusion in the annual crime statistics and to aid in providing timely warning notices to the community, when appropriate.

Policies on Security & Access to Campus Facilities The Campus Safety Office (CSO) is a service unit within campus administration dedicated to the protection of students and campus property. The Campus Safety Office is located at the 70th Street lobby reception desk whenever the College is open. The CSO may be reached on-campus by picking up a campus phone located on the third and fourth floor of the 70th Street building or by dialing the main NYSID number and selecting 409, 410, or 420. Photography of the College facilities is not permitted. Anyone wishing to photograph the College must contact the Office of External Relations.

Enforcement Authority of NYSID / Public Safety Due to security concerns, NYSID cannot accept packages addressed to students and delivered to any College building. All packages will be refused by the receptionist and returned to sender. NYSID is not responsible for any financial penalty or cost for the mailing or contents of a student package. The Campus Safety Officer is informed with regard to security procedures. Neither the lobby receptionist nor CSO is armed. The cooperation and involvement of all members of the campus community in a campus safety and security program is essential. Students, faculty, and staff should report any suspicious persons or any unusual incidents that are observed.

Weapons on Campus No individual within the NYSID community shall have in their possession a firearm or other dangerous weapon, instrument or material that can be used to inflict bodily harm on an individual or damage to

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school property regardless of whether the individual possesses a valid permit to carry the firearm or weapon.

Emergency & Evacuation Procedures Be aware of all marked exits from your area and building and know the routes out of the building. If necessary or directed to do so, activate the building alarms. The 69 Street and 70 Street buildings should be evacuated immediately when any fire alarm or smoke/carbon monoxide alarm sounds continuously and/or upon notification by the Campus Safety Office or Emergency Responders. At 170 East 70 Street & 161 East 69 Street: Evacuate the buildings immediately upon hearing a fire alarm in the facility unless instructed not to. Use the nearest stairwell and/or exit to leave the building. •

Meeting Location for 170 East 70th St.: 3rd Ave between 70th St. and 71st St. in front of Gracious Home.

Meeting Location for 161 East 69th St.: 3rd Ave between 68th St. and 69st St. in front of CVS pharmacy.

At the Graduate Center, 401 Park Ave South: After the sound of the fire alarm, listen carefully for the instructions given over the building public announcement system. Do not evacuate unless you are instructed to do so. •

Meeting Location: Park Avenue between 28th St. and 29th St. in front of Bread and Butter.

When evacuating the buildings, move quickly to the nearest exit. Once outside the building keep sidewalks and building entrances clear for emergency responders and do not reenter the buildings until cleared by the fire department. Notify emergency personnel regarding any persons believed to still be in the building. NYSID Emergency Procedure Plan: nysid.edu/file/EmergencyPlan2016.pdf

Fire Drills Fire drills are conducted throughout the year in accordance with New York City Fire Department codes. All students, faculty, and staff are required to participate. If a fire alarm is sounded in the 69 or 70 Street buildings calmly proceed to the nearest exit in an orderly manner, using only the staircases, and leave the building or follow the directions of the floor warden. At 401 Park Avenue South, please listen carefully for instructions through the public address system for detailed instructions. Elevators are not to be used when exiting the school while the fire alarm is sounding.

Use of Artists’ Toxic Materials Many commonly used artists’ materials contain toxic or highly flammable substances that can be injurious if they are not used with caution. Utmost care must be taken when using these materials. Labels should be carefully read and strict adherence with manufacturers’ handling instructions must be observed. Toxic and flammable substances should not be left in lockers.

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Crime Statistics In compliance with the Jeanne Clery Disclosure of Campus Security Policy and Campus Crime Statistics Act and the Higher Education Opportunity Act, the New York School of Interior Design reports statistics for the three previous calendar years. They can be found at nysid.edu/campus-security.

Advisory Committee on Campus Safety and Security The Advisory Committee on Campus Security (NY State Education Department Article 129-A of the Education Law) reviews current policies and procedures on campus security issues and make recommendations for their improvement. The committee will report these findings in writing to the College president and the report will be available upon request. The Advisory Committee on Campus Safety and the Campus Safety Officer will provide upon request all campus crime statistics as reported to the United States Department of Education. These statistics are available at www.ope.ed.gov/security and on the NYSID website. Requests for a hard copy of the Annual Security Report can be directed to: Advisory Committee on Campus Security Dean of Students Office 170 East 70 St, NY, NY 10021 212-472-1500, ext. 202 Campus Safety Officer 170 East 70 Street 212-472-1500, ext. 420

Title IX Title IX of the Educational Amendments of 1972 prohibits any person in the United States from being discriminated against on the basis of sex in seeking access to any educational program or activity receiving federal financial assistance. The U.S. Department of Education, which enforces Title IX, has long defined the meaning of Title IX’s prohibition on sex discrimination broadly to include various forms of sexual harassment and sexual violence that interfere with a student’s ability to equally access our educational programs and opportunities. On May 19, 2020, the U.S. Department of Education issued a Final Rule under Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972 that: Defines the meaning of “sexual harassment” (including forms of sex-based violence); Addresses how this institution must respond to reports of misconduct falling within that definition of sexual harassment, and; Mandates a grievance process. Based on the Final Rule, the New York School of Interior Design will implement the following Title IX Grievance Policy, effective August 14, 2020. You may read the policy here: NYSID Title IX—Grievance Policy for Addressing Formal Complaints Under the Title IX Regulations (August 2020) The policy can also be found on the nysid.edu campus safety and security page: https://www.nysid.edu/campus-safety-security.

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Non-Title IX Student Sexual Misconduct Policy & Procedures For Students Sexual misconduct is not tolerated in NYSID’s education programs or activities. NYSID strictly prohibits sexual harassment and sexual violence, including the offenses of sexual assault, sexual coercion, sexual exploitation, dating violence, domestic violence, and stalking. Sexual misconduct can occur between strangers, acquaintances, or people who know each other well, including those who are involved in an intimate or sexual relationship, and can be committed by anyone regardless of sex, gender, or gender identity. NYSID adopts the standard of Affirmative Consent to sexual activity set forth in the NY Law. Questions regarding Title IX, the Clery Act, the Campus SaVE Act and the NY Law may be referred to NYSID’s Title IX Coordinator or to the U.S. Department of Education’s Office for Civil Rights. This policy will address conduct falling outside the jurisdiction and scope of the Title IX Grievance Policy for Addressing Formal Complaints of Sexual Harassment Under the Title IX Regulations August 2020. You may read the policy here: NYSID Non-Title IX Student Sexual Misconduct Policy & Procedures for Students (August 2020) The policy can also be found on the nysid.edu campus safety and security page: https://www.nysid.edu/campus-safety-security.

Discrimination and Harassment, Including Sexual Discrimination‚ and Harassment NYSID does not discriminate on the basis of gender, race, color, creed, disability, age, sexual orientation, marital status, national origin, or other legally protected status, and is firmly committed to the rights of all members of its community – students, faculty, and staff – who must interact through mutual respect and trust. Any student, faculty, or staff member who violates college policy by subjecting another to discrimination or harassment of any kind will be subject to appropriate disciplinary action. NYSID’s designated Title IX Coordinator is: Karen Higginbotham, Dean of Students, 170 East 70th Street, New York, NY 10021 (212) 472-1500, ext. 202 NYSID’s designated Deputy Title IX Coordinator is Yvonne Moray, Director of Human Resources, 401 Park Avenue South, New York, NY 10016 (212) 472-1500 ext. 461. Anyone who feels he or she may be the victim of harassment or discrimination by a member of the NYSID community should take immediate action. Every effort will be made to preserve confidentiality and to protect the rights of all involved. Student complaints regarding discrimination or harassment should be submitted, preferably in writing to: Title IX Coordinator. The complaint should clearly state the nature of the grievance, the person(s) involved and provide as much detailed information as possible (e.g., witnesses to the conduct in

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question, similar incidents, etc.). Establishing a formal complaint sets in motion other procedures designed to resolve the issues through the most effective and discreet process available. Any attempt to penalize or retaliate against anyone for filing a complaint will be treated as a separate violation and should be reported to either the Title IX coordinator or the Deputy Title IX Coordinator. The Title IX coordinator will conduct a preliminary investigation into the complaint and meet with individuals identified by the grievant and/or others who may be reasonably expected to shed light on the matter. Once a formal complaint is lodged against an individual, that person will be informed of the complaint and given an appropriate amount of information about the complaint to keep the investigation from being compromised. Formal complaints will be reviewed on an individual basis. Disciplinary proceedings and sanctions are detailed in this handbook under Judicial Procedures (Non-Academic).

Bias Crime Bias or hate crime prevention is of extreme importance to the New York School of Interior Design and the College is committed to preventing such crimes. Bias-related conduct–also referred to as hate crimes or bias-related crimes–are criminal activities motivated by bias or attitude against an individual victim or group based on perceived or actual personal characteristics, such as race, religion, ethnicity, gender, sexual orientation, veteran or military status, disability, national origin, gender identity or any other legally protected status. Bias related crimes are defined under New York State Hate Crimes Act of 2000, New York State Penal Code Article 485. If you are the victim of or witness to a hate/ bias crime on campus, contact the Campus Safety Office at ext 410 or a Campus Security Authority (CSA). If the incident is off campus dial 911 for the New York City Police Department. Support systems are in place for any bias-related crime through NYSID Counseling Services. The College conducts workshops each semester to include bias/hate crime prevention. Public safety services include routine transmittal of crime information and emergency phone numbers. Violations of this policy will result in disciplinary procedures and school sanctions.

Investigation of Violent Felony Offenses In the event the local precinct of the New York City Police Department has been contacted as a result of violent felony offenses (New York State penal code Article 70) all College personnel will cooperate fully with police authorities with the investigation process.

Missing Resident Student NYSID does not have an on-campus residential facility. Students reside at an off- campus facility managed by an independent organization. If, however, a member of the NYSID community believes a student residing in that facility is missing, the Dean of Students should be notified. The Dean will then

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notify the New York City Police Department for investigation. If the NYPD determines that the student is missing, NYSID will notify appropriate student contact person(s).

Drug-Free Schools Amendment NYSID has adopted regulations in accordance with the provisions of the Drug-Free Schools and Communities Act Amendment to the Higher Education Act of 1965. The Drug-Free Schools and Communities Act Amendments of 1989, enacted by the federal government, require colleges to adopt and implement a program to combat the unlawful possession, use, or distribution of illicit drugs and alcohol. The policies and procedures detailed in this program apply to all members of the New York School of Interior Design–students, faculty, and staff–and to all events and activities that occur at the College, as well as school events and activities that may occur off-campus. This program is intended to work within general administrative procedures and student codes of conduct. In addition, faculty, staff, and students are reminded that it is the responsibility of the members of this community, both individually and collectively, to comply with applicable local, state, and federal laws controlling drug and alcohol possession, use, or distribution. This policy is reviewed regularly and amended or revised in accordance with changes in local, state, and federal laws and regulations. Health Risks of Alcohol Abuse/ Illicit Drug Use Alcohol consumption and/or use of illicit drugs cause marked changes in behavior. Even low use significantly impairs the judgment and coordination required to drive a car safely, increasing the likelihood that the driver will be involved in an accident. Low-to-moderate use also increases the incidence of a variety of aggressive acts, including spouse and child abuse. Moderate to high use causes marked impairments in higher mental functions, severely altering a person’s ability to learn and remember information. Very high use causes respiratory disease, depression, and death. If depressants are combined, much lower use will produce the same effects. Repeated use can lead to dependence. Sudden cessation of intake is likely to produce withdrawal symptoms, including severe anxiety, tremors, hallucinations, and convulsions. Alcohol and drug withdrawal can be life threatening. Long-term consumption, particularly when combined with poor nutrition, can also lead to permanent damage to vital organs such as the brain and the liver. Educational programming regarding drug and alcohol abuse is conducted each semester through workshops and presentations. Resources for support and rehabilitation services are available through NYSID Counseling Services. (Refer to handbook section on Counseling Services for further information). Standards of Conduct in Relation to Drugs and Alcohol NYSID is committed to creating an environment for its students, faculty, and staff free of drug and alcohol abuse. NYSID strongly believes that a combination of preventive education about drug and alcohol abuse and counseling support for those with drug- and alcohol-related problems is the most effective means to achieve and maintain this environment. NYSID has developed guidelines controlling the consumption of alcoholic beverages and strictly prohibits the use of illicit drugs within the school environment or at off-campus events sponsored by NYSID. Accordingly, NYSID has adopted standards of conduct concerning the use and abuse of illicit drugs and alcohol.

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The unlawful possession, use, or distribution of illicit drugs on College premises or at College activities is strictly prohibited. Serving, possession, and consumption of alcoholic beverages must comply fully with New York State and appropriate local laws. Based on such laws, the following standards must be respected: •

Persons under age 21 are prohibited from possessing any alcoholic beverage at the College or at any event sponsored by the College or by any school organization. Accordingly, no person shall be served an alcoholic beverage if that person is under the legal drinking age of 21, or seems to be intoxicated.

No person under age 21 shall use fraudulent proof of his or her age to gain possession of alcoholic beverages being served.

No person shall misrepresent one’s age or that of another person under 21 to purchase or attempt to gain possession of alcoholic beverages being served at a school-sponsored event.

At all events or activities at which any alcoholic beverage is to be served, the individual or group sponsoring the event shall be responsible for compliance with all laws and regulations as well as NYSID policies regarding alcoholic beverages. Any action or situation that recklessly or intentionally endangers the mental or physical health of or involves the forced consumption of alcohol or drugs (hazing) for the purpose of invitation into or affiliation with any organization is prohibited.

NYSID will take appropriate actions to enforce these standards of conduct. Individual students who violate this or related policies shall be subject to the appropriate disciplinary process and sanctions. To further its educational mission, NYSID seeks to assist those with alcohol- and drug-related problems to obtain counseling and support services and to participate in rehabilitation programs. Details of health risks of drug and alcohol abuse, as well as information regarding available counseling and rehabilitations are contained in this handbook. At the discretion of the College administration, an alternative or additional disciplinary action may involve participation in and satisfactory completion of an appropriate counseling or rehabilitation program. Criminal Sanctions The unlawful possession, use or distribution of illicit drugs and alcohol are punishable to the full extent of the laws of the U.S. government and the state of New York. Where illicit drugs are involved, the seriousness of the offense and the penalty imposed upon conviction usually depends on the individual drug and the amount of the drug held or sold. For example, in New York State the criminal possession of four or more ounces of cocaine is a class A-1 felony, punishable by a minimum of 15-25 years and a maximum of life in prison. The sale of two ounces of cocaine will be similarly treated. The criminal possession of more than eight ounces of marijuana is a class E felony, punishable by up to four years in prison, as is the sale of more than 25 grams of marijuana. It is important to be aware that, in New York, if one gives or offers drugs, including marijuana, it is treated as a sale. Federal penalties are similar to those imposed by the state. A person need not be in actual physical possession of a controlled substance to be guilty of a crime. Similarly, the presence of certain substances, including marijuana, in open view under circumstances demonstrating intent to prepare the substance for sale is presumptive evidence of knowing possession of anyone in close proximity.

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Criminal penalties may also result from the misuse of alcoholic beverages. In New York, if one gives or sells an alcoholic beverage to a person less than 21 years of age, the person is committing a class B misdemeanor, punishable by up to three months in jail and/or a $500 fine. Any sale of any kind of alcoholic beverage without a license or permit is also a misdemeanor punishable by a fine, a jail term, or both. Persons under age 21 are prohibited from possessing alcoholic beverages with intent to consume them. Each violation is punishable by a $50 fine. The beverages may also be seized and destroyed by appropriate internal or external authorities. An individual can be fined up to $100 and/or required to perform community service if he/she is under 21 and presents a falsified proof when attempting to purchase alcoholic beverages. A person can have a driver’s license suspended for 90 days if he or she is under 21 and uses a driver’s license to try to purchase alcohol illegally. It is NYSID’s policy to encourage faculty, staff, and students to comply with federal, state, and city laws. Where appropriate, the College will cooperate fully with relevant government authorities regarding the prosecution of such violations.

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STUDENT CODE OF CONDUCT Violations In order to give students a better understanding of the kind of behavior that violates the Student Code of Conduct, and is therefore subject to disciplinary action, a list of possible offenses follows. While the list gives examples of the broad scope of prohibited conduct, it is not exhaustive. •

Refusal to comply with the safety protocols required by the NYSID Return to Campus plan.

Disorderly, disruptive, or aggressive behavior that interferes with the general comfort, safety, security, health, or welfare of a member of the NYSID community or the regular operation of the College.

Disorderly, disruptive, aggressive, threatening, or behavior deemed unprofessional, creating a classroom climate that is not conducive to learning.

Disrespect to any member of the NYSID community and/or failure to comply with the lawful directions of College faculty or staff.

Physical violence, actual or threatened, against any individual or group of persons.

Violation of the College policy on discrimination and harassment not otherwise subject to student Sexual Misconduct Policy.

Unauthorized entry or misuse of College property, or contributing to such unauthorized entry of another individual.

Plagiarism and/or any violation of the Academic Honesty Code (refer to Student Handbook section: Academic Honesty Code and Academic Judicial Procedures)

Intentionally and/or knowingly providing false information, testimony, or evidence.

Damage, destruction, or removal of another student’s work or property.

Vandalism or damage to personal or NYSID property.

Use of spray paint, spray adhesive, or spray glue in any NYSID building, including but not limited to classrooms, studios, offices, roof terrace, residence hall, common spaces, and stairwells.

Use, possession, or storage of any weapon, dangerous chemical, fireworks, or explosives, regardless of the presence of a state or federal license to possess same.

Theft of services or property, including failure to report knowledge of possession of stolen property, including but not limited to the theft of another student’s creative work.

No form of cyber-bullying will be tolerated at NYSID. Cyber-bullying has been defined as “the use of information and communication technologies to support deliberate, repeated, and hostile behavior by an individual or group that is intended to harm others.”

Engaging in, or threatening to engage in, any other behavior that endangers the health or safety of another person, property, or oneself.

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Assisting another student to commit an act that violates the Code of Conduct.

Judicial Procedures (Non-Academic) The New York School of Interior Design is committed to providing you with opportunities to pursue your creative and academic interests in an atmosphere that is conducive to teaching and learning. The principal responsibility for conduct rests with each student and it is expected that social and academic standards are valued and upheld. Expected standards of behavior are defined in the Student Handbook and made public through the NYSID Portal. When a student violates these standards, appropriate sanction must be imposed by way of a judicial process with due regard to the person’s rights as an individual. Sexual misconduct violation proceedings are defined in the Student Sexual Misconduct Policy & Procedures: nysid.edu/file/SexualMisconductPolicyProcedures.pdf. Judicial/Disciplinary procedures do not follow the rules of procedure used in court proceedings and legal representation is not permitted in any hearing. Should a student’s presence on campus create a threat to the safety and well-being of the NYSID community, NYSID reserves the right to immediately suspend that student pending the final outcome of the judicial process. Additionally, NYSID reserves the right to resolve the case and sanction a student, without a hearing where such action is deemed necessary or appropriate by the president. Due to COVID-19, violation or disregard of protocols and guidelines of the Return to Campus Plan will be considered as a violation of the Student Code of Conduct. Due to the importance of this plan to ensure the safety health and well-being of the NYSID community, NYSID reserves the right to resolve the case and sanction a student without a hearing where such action is deemed necessary by the Coronavirus Response Team and/or President. Sanctions may be immediately imposed and include but are not limited to access to campus or suspension. Filing of Allegations/Incident (Non-Academic) Any member of the NYSID community may initiate the judicial process against any student for alleged violation (s) of the Student Code of Conduct by submitting a complaint through an incident report to the dean of students. An incident report is a detailed, written description of the alleged violation of the Student Code of Conduct. Complaints must be filed within 30 days of the incident that precipitated the complaint. Incident report forms (Notice of Occurrence Form) are available at the security desks of all campus locations and the Dean of Students Office. Preliminary Review of Complaint (Non-Academic) Upon receipt of the written incident report, the dean of students is authorized to conduct a preliminary review of the complaint to determine whether judicial procedures are an appropriate response or if the complaint should be referred elsewhere. If it is determined that there is sufficient information or basis to support the complaint and judicial procedures are to occur, a student is informed in writing of the complaint made against him/her and the next steps in the process. Students will be advised in the notification to prepare a written statement responding to the charges for presentation at the disciplinary hearing.

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If it is determined that there is insufficient information or basis to support the complaint, or to warrant judicial procedures, the dean is authorized to dismiss the complaint or issue a disciplinary sanction to the student (s) involved in the incident report. Decision to dismiss a complaint is final. Review of Complaint (Non-Academic) After the preliminary review and student has been notified in writing of the complaint of the alleged violation, the Disciplinary Committee consisting of the Dean of Students and two NYSID Administrative Staff members (appointed from the President’s Council on a rotating basis) will review the complaint. If necessary, the committee may hold a review meeting with the person submitting the incident report and any witnesses identified to determine all the facts surrounding the alleged violation. The Committee will meet with all parties on a one-on-one basis. If it is determined by the Disciplinary Committee that there is insufficient information or basis to support the complaint, the Committee is authorized to dismiss the complaint. Decision to dismiss a complaint is final. If it is determined that there is sufficient information or basis to support the complaint a judicial hearing will occur. Hearing Notification & Scheduling (Non-Academic) A student will be notified in writing of the time and location of the hearing. Failure to respond and/or participate in a hearing will result in a decision being made in the student’s absence. All alleged violations and statements in the filed complaint will be considered true and accurate and appropriate administrative actions shall be taken. In allegations involving more than one accused student, separate hearings will be conducted for each student. The alleged violator may waive the disciplinary hearing if he/she chooses to take responsibility for violating the Student Code of Conduct. The student must meet with the dean of students to sign a statement acknowledging an understanding and acceptance of the charges of violation(s) of the code of conduct, and appropriate sanctions will be imposed. The Hearing Process (Non-Academic) The disciplinary hearing for alleged infractions of the Student Code of Conduct will be conducted by the Disciplinary Committee (established for the initial review process). The student may not be accompanied by any other person to the hearing (including family member, friend or attorney). Electronic recordings of any kind, transmissions of the hearing proceeding and mobile phones or other recording devices are not permitted in the hearing. One of the hearing administrators will take notes during the hearing and produce a summary of those notes soon after the conclusion of the hearing. These records will be retained in the Dean of Students Office. The accused may request, in writing access to view these records. During the hearing, the student is presented with information pertaining to the allegation that he/she has violated the NYSID Student Code of Conduct. The student will then be permitted to submit the written statement of response to the allegation and present information on his/ her behalf. Questions may be posed by the Disciplinary Committee to better clarify or understand the charges as well as the student perspective on the incident and circumstances. At the conclusion of the hearing, the student will be asked to make a final statement and the hearing will close. The Disciplinary Committee will make a final determination regarding whether the student is responsible for the violation(s) based on all of the information available. If the student is found responsible, the degree of seriousness of the offense and the student’s previous disciplinary record will determine the sanction to be issued.

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A student will be notified in writing within 10 business days of the outcome of the hearing and advised of any sanctions to be imposed. Sanctions imposed by the Committee are effective immediately unless specifically stated otherwise in the written notification. Decisions made by the Disciplinary Committee shall be final, pending the normal appeal process. Appeals (Non-Academic) Once the hearing process is completed and a sanction is imposed, the student has the right to appeal. An appeal must be made in writing to the dean of students. The request must include the reason the Disciplinary Committee decision should be reevaluated and must be received by the dean within seven days of the written notification to the student regarding the hearing outcome. While the appeal is pending, sanctions imposed by the Disciplinary Committee will remain in effect. A student making an appeal must not expect the case to be decided in time to register for the succeeding semester, even should the decision to require suspension or expulsion to be reversed. Appeals will only be considered if one or more of the following conditions are met: •

It can be demonstrated that the sanction(s) is excessive or more severe than the infraction.

The student has new information not reasonably available at the time of the hearing.

The student has concerns with the hearing process that may change or affect the outcome of the decision.

The dean will review the appeal and do one of the following: Accept the appeal. Designate a new Disciplinary Committee to reevaluate the hearing proceeding records and sanctions to determine if the outcome of the original decision is warranted. This Committee may change the sanction making it less or more severe. Additionally, they may request a new hearing if sufficient cause is determined. Deny the appeal due to insufficient reason for appeal. The student will be notified in writing of the final decision, within 10 business day of the receipt of the appeal. No further appeal will be granted. As per Article 129B New York State Education Law—at least one level of appeal equally to both parties will be granted for sexual misconduct proceedings. Sanctions (Non-Academic) NYSID shall take into account the circumstances surrounding the event, the nature of the violation, and the individual’s previous record at NYSID. At the discretion of the College administration, an alternative or additional disciplinary action may involve participation in and satisfactory completion of an appropriate counseling or rehabilitation program. Sponsoring student organizations are also held responsible for violations of the standards of conduct and related policies. Where violations occur, student organizations may be penalized, may have funding revoked, may be denied use of facilities and services, and may be barred from recognition of future student activities. Violation of Student Code of Conduct may result in the following sanctions: Verbal warning

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Oral warning to student that action is a violation and continued wrongful conduct may result in more severe disciplinary sanctions. Written warning Written notification to student that action is a violation and continued wrongful conduct may result in more severe disciplinary sanctions. Restitution (nonacademic only) Reimbursement for damage or loss to either NYSID or individual property. Failure to do so may result in further sanctions or denial of enrollment, graduation, and/or withholding student transcript. Disciplinary probation Written notification to the student that any repetition or further violation of the Student Code of Conduct or Academic Honesty Code may result in suspension or expulsion. Restriction Denial of certain facilities or the right to participate in certain activities or privileges for a specified period of time. Course credit denial and/or failure No credit earned for course(s) in question and/or receive a permanent grade of WF on transcript for that course. Suspension Exclusion from classes, exams, and all functions of the College for a specified period of time. Tuition and fees are not refundable for suspension or expulsion. Expulsion Dismissal from the College. The student may not attend classes, exams, or functions and will not be able to access his or her NYSID accounts and must vacate College property by the effective date of expulsion. Readmission will not be considered. Tuition and fees are not refundable for suspension or expulsion.

Records and Transcripts Non-academic disciplinary records will be maintained in the Dean of Students Office. These records do not become a part of the students’ permanent record and are confidential. They may however be referred to if the student becomes involved in another disciplinary action. Records are retained for one year after graduation or withdrawal from the College. As detailed in NYSID’s Student Sexual Misconduct Policy & Procedures for Students, for crimes of violence, including but not limited to sexual violence, a notation shall be made on the transcripts of students found responsible after a conduct process that they were “suspended after a finding of responsibility for a code of conduct violation” or “expelled after a finding of responsibility for a code of con-duct violation.” For the respondent who withdraws from the institution while such conduct charges are pending and declines to complete the disciplinary process. NYSID shall make a notation on the transcript of such students that they “withdrew with conduct charges pending.” Students may seek

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removal of a transcript notation for a suspension, but the notation shall not be removed prior to one year after the conclusion of the suspension. Expulsion notations shall not be removed. If a finding of responsibility is vacated for any reason, any such transcript notation shall be removed. The New York School of Interior Design reserves the right to change and/or add policies and procedures. A reasonable effort to inform students of such changes will be made as they become necessary.

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ADMINISTRATIVE STUDENT SERVICES Office of the Registrar The Office of the Registrar is located on the second floor of the 69 Street building. Students can receive assistance with registration, identification cards, transcript requests, enrollment verification, lockers, and updating their records. Due to COVID-19, locker rental has been suspended for 2020–2021. In order to attend courses at NYSID, one must be formally accepted by the Office of Admissions or be enrolled as a non- matriculated or continuing education student. Those with prior education or professional experience desiring to enroll in undergraduate courses without taking the prerequisites at NYSID must have the approval of an academic advisor. These students must provide necessary documentation such as a portfolio or transcript along with relevant course descriptions to demonstrate qualifications prior to registration. Upon matriculation, students plan their programs of study with an academic advisor. Academic advisors are assigned to each student at the time that they first request information about the College, and more formally, at the time at which the student begins to take classes. Advisees are assigned by first initial of their last name. Each semester, students register during the registration period and according to procedures specified by the registrar. Students should register during regular registration periods in order to ensure having their desired schedule. Schedules are published in course bulletins, which are posted on the NYSID website and Portal. Returning students are responsible for knowing the registration schedules and will be charged a late fee for registering after the regular registration period. This late fee is not negotiable. Late registrations are accepted through the first week of a semester. Late registrations for the summer session must be processed before the second class.

Student Identification Cards Student ID cards and lanyards can be obtained in the Office of the Registrar during the first week of the semester for new students. Hours for obtaining a student ID card are posted on the NYSID Portal and throughout both campuses. Replacement ID cards can be obtained throughout the school year. A fee of $25 will be charged to issue a replacement ID card, and a fee of $5 will be charged to replace a lost lanyard. Semester validation stickers for continuing students’ ID cards are available in the Office of the Registrar, the 70th Street reception desk, and the Graduate Center reception desk. Student ID cards and lanyards are issued to all students registered for credit-bearing courses and must be worn whenever on campus. Printed on the student ID card is the student’s ID number, which is the same number used for future registrations and to access computer accounts and the NYSID Portal. Student ID cards must have a current semester validation sticker in order to check out books from the NYSID Library and for entry to New York University’s Bobst Library, the Cooper Union Library, and the Gimbel Library at Parsons School of Design. Many art supply stores and museums accept the student ID card as basis for student discounts. In addition, a student ID card must be scanned for attendance to all

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large lecture classes, such as Historical Styles. Students must present their ID cards to their instructors at the first class session, if requested, and upon request by any NYSID authorized personnel thereafter. ID cards for graduate students and all faculty members are identified with a “G.” This card is required to access the Graduate Center, hours for which are posted on the NYSID Portal. No one without a Graduate student ID card will be allowed to enter the Graduate Center without prior approval.

Enrollment Verification Students can obtain enrollment verification from the Office of the Registrar by submitting a written request. Enrollment verification provides details on whether the student is enrolled full-time, part-time, or less than part-time for the current semester or for all of the semesters that the student has been enrolled. If verification needs to be sent prior to the start of the term, the College can indicate “anticipated enrollment” for future terms.

NYSID Portal The NYSID Portal (portal.nysid.edu) provides a secure location for students to reserve classes, view schedules and grade reports, and receive other timely announcements. Individuals may use the NYSID Portal only with the express authority of NYSID and within the user sign-on and password procedures authorized by NYSID administration. Using an account that belongs to another individual or giving an individual other than the owner access to any NYSID account is prohibited. Some individuals will be given access to the student information systems and/or other administrative systems. The confidentiality of these records is governed by the Federal Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974 (a.k.a., Buckley Amendment, FERPA). All information is confidential and students have a right to expect that their scholastic records are being properly supervised and maintained. Communication of this information is restricted to other authorized parties in accordance with provisions of FERPA. Requests for disclosure of this information must be approved by the appropriate administrative officer at NYSID. Each user is legally responsible for all activity originating from his or her account. For more information on FERPA see the General Policies section of this handbook.

Access to the NYSID Portal Students receive log-in information for the NYSID Portal after they submit their enrollment deposit or when they enroll as non-matriculated students. Matriculated students and all students having previously registered for a course at NYSID can register online through the NYSID Portal (portal.nysid.edu) using their ID number/username and password. Nonmatriculated and continuing education students may register through the Institute for Continuing and Professional Studies (ICPS) on the NYSID website nysid.edu/icps. After a student has registered for the first time, the student will receive an ID number and password via email, which will provide access to the NYSID Portal for subsequent registrations. Continuing education students taking courses through ICPS will be able to use their payment receipts as their ID cards.

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Non-matriculated Status Non-matriculated students may accumulate a maximum of 12 academic credits and must satisfy the prerequisites for each course. A student who completes the maximum allowable credits as a nonmatriculated student, and wishes to continue studying at the College must apply to one of the degree programs or to the Basic Interior Design certificate program.

Proof of Immunization Students attending online classes as a result of the COVID-19 class format changes are still required to provide proof of immunization as described below. The New York State Legislature has mandated that all students born on or after January 1, 1957 and registered for six or more credits must provide proof of immunity against measles, mumps, and rubella (MMR) (Public Health Law, Article 21, Title VI, section 2165). New York State Public Health Law 2167 requires that all college and university students enrolled for at least six credits or the equivalent acknowledge the receipt of information about meningococcal disease and vaccination or report obtaining the vaccination. The required forms are provided to the student at the time of admission and are posted on the NYSID Portal and can be obtained from the Office of the Registrar. Please note that according to NYS public health law, no institutions shall permit any student to attend the institution for more than 30 days without complying with these laws. The 30-day period may be extended to 60 days if a student can show a good faith effort to comply. Failure to comply will result in a hold being placed on the student’s account, which will prevent registration for courses, and the College can withdraw the student from classes.

Veterans Students enrolling under the GI Bill must notify the veterans certifying official/ registrar before registering for courses and provide a certification of benefits statement from the Veterans Administration in order to process enrollment certifications and qualify for payment of benefits.

Change of Student Information Students are responsible for reporting a change of name, address, telephone, or email, and providing a contact in case of an emergency. Students are responsible for updating their personal information (cell phone number) each semester on the NYSID Portal or in writing on a Change of Information form, which is available in the Office of the Registrar and on the NYSID Portal. International students must also contact the International Student Advisor to report an address change within 10 days of a move. It is important that contact information is current, as this is the way that the administration and faculty communicate with students, including in case of emergencies. In addition to the students’ own contact information, it is also important that students provide an emergency contact person in the event the student needs assistance. NYSID is not responsible for miscommunication arising from a student’s failure to maintain accurate contact information with the Office of the Registrar.

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Course Bulletins Courses for an upcoming semester are posted on the portal one week in advance of the first day of registration. Course bulletins are electronically published each semester and are available on the NYSID Portal and on nysid.edu early in each registration period. The College reserves the right to change course dates, times, and faculty without prior notice.

Confirmation of Schedule Provided that a student’s registration is approved, the student will access their schedule through the NYSID Portal. Registration information is not mailed to students. Any discrepancy should be brought to the attention of the registrar at [email protected] It is strongly recommended that students periodically check the NYSID Portal to view their schedule online. Schedules may change due to changes of faculty, canceled sections, movement off a waitlist, lack of tuition payment, or other reasons. It is the student’s responsibility to verify his or her schedule by viewing the NYSID Portal on a regular basis. The College reserves the right to change faculty and cancel or modify course sections and schedules at any time.

Prerequisites & Co-Requisites It is the sole responsibility of the student to ensure that all courses are taken in the sequence outlined in the Academic Catalog. In no case will a student be allowed to register for a course without having successfully completed the required prerequisite. It is solely the student’s responsibility to ensure that a course designated as a co-requisite is taken prior to or during the same semester. Students who register for courses out of sequence are subject to an involuntary withdrawal and the College’s published refund policy.

Courses Canceled Due to Low Enrollment The College reserves the right to cancel classes due to low enrollment. Classes with insufficient enrollment will be canceled in advance of the beginning of a semester to allow students time to reschedule their classes. Notice of canceled courses will show on the student’s schedule as posted on the NYSID Portal. Students are responsible for periodically checking their schedules for changes and registration information prior to the start of each semester. If a course is canceled entirely, no drop fee will be charged. At times, students may be enrolled by their advisor in alternative sections of a course if the original section was canceled. The College makes every effort to notify students of such changes in a timely fashion.

Maintaining Academic Records Following formal acceptance by the Office of Admissions, the registrar maintains all official academic records. These records become the property of the College. Student records are maintained for five years after the last date of attendance. Items that are not considered academic or education records are recorded as the following: personal observations, alumni records, peer graded papers and exams prior to the grade being recorded in the instructor’s grade book, university law enforcement records, and “sole possession” records made by faculty and staff of their own use as reference or memory aids and not shared with others. NYSID Student Handbook 2020–2021 | 42


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There are limitations on a student’s right to inspect and review their education records. NYSID is not required to allow students to review the following: Confidential letters of recommendations or documents pertaining to parents’ financial records whether those letters were collected in a confidential manner, or if the student waived his/her rights to inspect and review said letters and are related to the students’ admission.

Grades After each semester, students may view their grades through the NYSID Portal. Grades are not reported over the phone or via email. It is the responsibility of the student to report any concerns about final grades first to the faculty member assigning the grade, with the option of following up on any concern with their academic advisor.

The Family Educational Rights & Privacy Act (FERPA) NYSID has adopted in accordance with provisions of the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA). A copy of the law can be found at: https://www2.ed.gov/policy/gen/guid/fpco/ferpa/index.html. FERPA grants students certain rights with respect to their education records and information. Education records contain information such as academic transcript and financial aid and student account records. According to FERPA, a student’s rights regarding these records are: The right to inspect and review your education records. Students should submit to the registrar a written request that identifies the record(s) they wish to inspect. New York School of Interior Design will make arrangements for access and notify the student of the time and place where the records may be inspected within a reasonable time. The right to request the amendment of your education records to ensure that they are accurate and not in violation of your privacy rights. Students should write to the NYSID official responsible for the record, clearly identify the part of the record they want changed, and specify why it is inaccurate or misleading. If the New York School of Interior Design decides not to amend the record as requested by the student, NYSID will notify the student of the decision and advise the student of his or her right to a hearing. Additional information regarding the hearing procedures will be provided to the student at that time. The right to file with the U.S. Department of Education a complaint concerning alleged failures by NYSID to comply with the requirements of FERPA. The name and address of the office that administers FERPA is: Family Policy Compliance Office, U.S. Department of Education, 400 Maryland Avenue SW, Washington, D.C. 20202-4605. The right to consent to disclosures of personally identifiable information contained in your education records (information that would make your identity easily traceable; e.g., Social Security number, etc.) except to the extent that FERPA authorizes disclosure without consent. One exception which permits disclosure without consent is disclosure to College officials with legitimate educational interests. A College official is a person employed by the New York School of Interior Design in an administrative, supervisory, academic or research, or support staff position (including law enforcement unit personnel and health staff); a person or company with whom NYSID has contracted (such as an attorney, auditor, or collection agent); a person serving on the Board of Trustees; or a student serving on an official

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committee, such as a disciplinary or grievance committee, or assisting another College official in performing his or her tasks. A College official has legitimate educational interest if the official needs to review an education record in order to fulfill his or her professional responsibility. The Office of the Registrar is the main contact for all purposes of the FERPA Policy.

Record Amendment Requests Students that wish to challenge their records must submit a request in writing to the appropriate office maintaining said record, for ex-ample, the Office of the Registrar, or the Office of Admissions. Students must list the specific information they wish to question and a reason for the challenge. All hearings will be conducted by a school official who has no direct interest in the outcome of the hearing. Students will be granted a full and fair opportunity to present their evidence that is relevant to their question. Once a decision is made by the hearing officer, a written decision will be made detailing the outcome of the decision and a brief summary of the evidence presented. If the outcome of the hearing is in favor of the student, the record in question will be amended accordingly. If the student’s request is denied, the student may appeal, in writing, to the school’s registrar within 10 days of the student receiving the denial. This appeal will be heard by an appeals board of three disinterested senior college officials and a decision will be made within a reasonable amount of time in writing. If the appeal is in favor of the student, the record will be amended accordingly. If the request is denied, the student has the right to place a statement with the record in question with a comment on the accuracy of the information.

Directory Information Directory information includes address, telephone, dates of attendance, degrees awarded, and email address which can be shared with third parties without consent of the students. NYSID offers students the opportunity to request that this information is not provided to outside interests. This request should be made in writing and submitted to the registrar.

Personal Identifiable Information Personally identifiable information is data or information which includes, but is not limited to: •

The student’s name

The name of the student’s parent or other family members

A personal identifier, such as the student’s social security number, student number, or biometric record

Other indirect identifiers, such as the student’s date of birth, place of birth, and mother’s maiden name

Other information that, alone or in combination, is linked or linkable to a specific student and that would allow a reasonable person in the school community who does not have personal knowledge of the relevant circumstances to identify the student with reasonable certainty

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Information requested by a person who the educational agency or institution reasonably believes knows the identity of the student to whom the education record relates.

A student’s personal identifiable information can be disclosed to their parents if they are claimed as a dependent for tax purposes. Some instances in which student consent is not needed for disclosure are as follows: •

To NYSID college officials and staff who have a legitimate educational interest

To federal, state and local authorities involving an audit or evaluation of compliance with educational programs

In connection with financial aid; this includes veteran’s benefits

To organizations conducting studies for or on behalf of educational institutions

To accrediting organizations

To parents of dependent students

To comply with judicial orders of subpoenas (see #2)

In a health or safety emergency (see #3)

Releasing directory information (see #4)

Releasing the results of a disciplinary hearing to an alleged victim of a crime of violence

Deceased students (see #5)

Conducting Studies FERPA allows an institution to disclose personally identifiable information from education records, without consent, to organizations conducting studies “for, or on behalf of” the institution so long as the information is destroyed by the organization when the information is no longer needed for the study. Subpoenas Non-directory, personally identifiable information from education records can be released “to comply with a judicial order or lawfully issued subpoena” provided that the “institution makes a reasonable effort to notify the student of the order or subpoena in advance of compliance.” FERPA exempts institutions from the notification requirements in the case of a federal grand jury subpoena, or any other subpoena issued for a law enforcement purpose, that specifically orders that notification not be made in the subpoena. Health or Safety Emergency If non-directory information is needed to resolve an emergency situation, an educational institution may release that information if the institution determines that it is “necessary to protect the health or safety of the students or other individuals.” Factors to be considered or questions to be asked in making a decision to release student information in these situations are: (1) the severity of the threat or health or safety of those involved; (2) the need for the information: (3) the time required to deal with the emergency; and (4) the ability of the parties whom the information will be given to deal with the emergency.

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Directory Information Defined as information that would not generally be considered harmful or an invasion of privacy if disclosed. Student identification numbers (except under very specific circumstances), social security numbers, race/ethnicity, gender, citizenship, nationality or religion may not be designated as directory information. Deceased Students Under common law regarding privacy rights, the privacy interests of an individual expire with that individual’s death. Disposition of records held by an institution pertaining to a deceased eligible student is not a FERPA issue but a matter of institutional policy and/or state law. Former Student’s Rights NYSID students who have discontinued their studies for less than one academic year, have taken an official Leave of Absence, or who have completed their program requirements but not yet graduated, have the same FERPA rights as currently enrolled students. These students have the right to inspect their educational records, have a hearing to amend an education record, and have their education record privacy protected. However, NYSID has adopted the policy that once a student has withdrawn, stopped attending or graduated from NYSID, they can no longer request non-disclosure of their directory information.

Office of the Bursar The bursar is located on the second floor of the 69 Street building. Students may make a tuition or fee payment, obtain information on their account status, or receive information on payment options in this office. Students may also inquire about refunds and financial aid credit balances. Payment of Tuition and Fees In general, tuition and all applicable fees must be paid no later than 15 calendar days after course reservations are approved by an academic advisor. Beginning 15 days prior to the beginning of the semester, tuition and all applicable fees are due at the time of course reservation and approval. Students may pay applicable fees and tuition online with credit cards (American Express, Discover, MasterCard, and Visa) and electronic ACH payments. Fees may also be paid by money order or check payable to NYSID. Students may choose to enroll in the Nelnet Campus Commerce plan, which must be confirmed by the Bursar’s Office prior to registration. Nelnet Campus Commerce is the only payment plan option recognized by NYSID. Payment options are not available to any student who was delinquent in payments in the previous semester or whose payment plan was canceled for nonpayment. Students must check the academic calendar and in the course bulletin for important registration and payment deadlines. Students are expected to review their student account periodically and to notify the Bursar’s Office for any discrepancies. Students accepted into the MFA, MPS, BA, BFA, AAS, and Basic Interior Design programs must pay a tuition deposit within 30 days of the date of acceptance into the program. Students pay tuition for their programs in accordance with tuition schedules published in the annual catalogs. Registration fees and tuition deposits are nonrefundable. Tuition and fee amounts are published in the current catalog.

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Students are expected to remain in good financial standing with NYSID and should pay any balance due by the date specified in their Tuition Payment Balance reminder email sent from their advisor. Failure to remain in good financial standing with NYSID may result in course withdrawal or in a hold that will block access to Canvas on the first day of the semester. Canvas is where you will find your syllabus, course handouts and a variety of ways to communicate with your instructors and fellow students. Refund Schedules Tuition refunds are calculated according to NYSID’s refund schedule based on the date the course is dropped online or the date of written receipt of notification at the College and the filing of a signed drop form. Telephone notification is not accepted. Refunds are not automatic and must be requested. All fees are nontransferable. Tuition deposits and registration/technology fees are nonrefundable. All refunds are paid by check regardless of the student’s method of payment. The refund schedule is published in the bulletin for each semester or session. Refunds resulting from dropping a course during the late registration period will not be processed until after the drop/add period.

Financial Aid Office Federal financial assistance is available to U.S. citizens and permanent residents who are matriculated and in good academic standing. There are financial aid programs for both full-time and part-time study, as well as a number of merit-based scholarships offered through NYSID. An applicant is considered for financial assistance upon completion of the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA). The FAFSA can be completed at www.fafsa.ed.gov. Students must apply for financial aid annually. The FAFSA for the following school year is available after October 1. Priority Processing Deadlines for Submitting a FASFA and/or Verification Documents Students attending Summer.............April 1 Students attending Fall & Spring......July 1 Students attending Spring only.........Nov 1 Award Eligibility Initial award letters are based on full time enrollment (12+ credits each semester). All awards are subject to change. Awards may be amended due to factors such as part-time enrollment, December graduation, lack of academic progress, changes needed due to verification, incomplete files, additional resources, etc. Students are expected to log on to the NYSID Portal regularly to view updates to their financial aid. It is the student’s responsibility to be aware of credit hours and cumulative GPA requirements for each program and/ or scholarship. Students may not receive federal financial aid for classes that do not count towards their degree or certificate. If a student is enrolled for ancillary courses, those courses cannot be factored into enrollment status for financial aid purposes. It is also the student's responsibility to inform the Financial Aid Office of any change in credit hours that may differ from the awarded letter provided and signed. Standards for Satisfactory Academic Progress (SAP)

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Federal regulations require that students be monitored for academic progress. Students must successfully complete 70% of their attempted credits and maintain a minimum GPA of 2.0 for undergraduate students and 3.0 for graduate students. A review is made at the conclusion of each semester. Students who fail to meet these requirements will be notified and put on financial aid warning status. Students may receive aid while on warning, but must meet SAP requirements at the conclusion of that semester to remain eligible for the following semester. If the SAP is not met during the warning status period, the student may appeal for an additional warning semester. If the appeal is granted for this semester, the SAP requirement must be met at the conclusion of that semester to continue to remain eligible for funds. If the SAP requirements are not met for three consecutive semesters, the student will no longer be eligible for financial aid funds at NYSID. Withdrawal Policy A student who officially, unofficially, or medically withdraws from the College within the first 60% of the semester will receive an adjustment to their financial aid. According to a calculation established by the Department of Education, the student’s awards will be pro-rated and excess funds will be returned to the appropriate Title IV program. The student is then required to settle their outstanding bill with the Bursar’s Office immediately. Additional financial aid information can be found at nysid.edu, under the Financial Aid tab. Students and parents are responsible for familiarizing themselves with this information. Financial Aid Disbursement Disbursement or “pay out” of financial aid will take place on or after the dates listed below. No funds will be disbursed in advance. No exceptions will be made. Summer 2020 .............................................................................................................................. July 10, 2020 Fall 2020 .......................................................................................................................... September 30, 2020 Spring 2021. ....................................................................................................................... February 24, 2021 When financial aid disburses, the funds are automatically applied to the student’s outstanding bill. Any excess aid will be mailed to the student in the form of a reimbursement check to be used for educational expenses (i.e. books, rent, transportation, etc.). Per Department of Education’s regulations, the Bursar’s Office has 14 days to refund excess funds from the date the federal student aid was disbursed to the student’s account. Loan Information & Borrowing History Students can track their borrowing history, loan amounts owed, interest rates, and loan servicer contact information at nslds.ed.gov under “Financial Aid Review.” The Financial Aid Office urges all students to be cognizant of their debt. Federal student loans are real loans and must be repaid even if your financial circumstances become difficult. Entrance Counseling and Master Promissory Note (MPN) Loan borrowers must complete electronic entrance counseling and a Master Promissory Note (MPN) before disbursement of any funds at studentloans.gov.

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Exit Interview for Loan Borrowers Loan borrowers must complete an exit interview upon graduation, or at any time their enrollment status drops below part-time (under six credits) for a semester. The exit interview provides important information regarding the proper repayment of a loan. Students can complete the exit interview online at studentloans.gov. A hold will be placed on the student’s account until the exit interview is completed. New York State Tuition Assistance Program (TAP) TAP is handled by the Office of the Registrar [email protected] at NYSID. The New York State Higher Education Services Corporation (HESC) administers the Tuition Assistance Program (TAP) to help pay the tuition for eligible full-time and part-time students. For more information regarding TAP visit: nysid.edu/financial-aid/tap hesc.ny.gov/pay-for-college/apply-for-financial-aid/nys-tap.html GI BILL® STUDENTS As required by Title 38 UCS 3679(e): Once the Veteran Student has submitted a copy of his/her Certificate of Eligibility (COE) for VA Funding, the college will not impose any penalty, including the assessment of late fees, the denial of access to classes, libraries, or other institutional facilities, or the requirement that a covered individual borrow additional funds, on any covered individual because of the individual’s inability to meet his or her financial obligations to the institution due to the delayed disbursement funding from VA under Chapter 31 or 33.

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Office of Admissions Change of Academic Program Students accepted into a NYSID program (e.g., Associate in Applied Science) wishing to transfer to another program (e.g., Bachelor of Fine Arts) must go through the Change of Academic Program process. This process includes completing a Change of Academic Program application form and submitting a portfolio. Portfolio requirements per program are listed on the Change of Academic Program form. The application, portfolio, and a copy of the student’s NYSID transcript (obtained by the Office of Admissions) will be reviewed. Only upon acceptance into the desired program may students register for courses in that program. A student who wishes to receive the certificate or degree in their current program before moving to a higher-level program is welcome to do so as long as the student will complete the total number of credits of their current degree within the semester prior to when the new degree program takes effect. To receive the certificate or degree of the current program, the student must submit a complete Graduation Candidacy and Diploma form. The certificate or degree of the lower-level program will not be granted until after the student has moved to a higher-level program. Students may request a change to a lower-level program. A portfolio submission is not required in this case. A student who changes to a lower-level program, including changing to that program in order to graduate at the lower level, will be assessed a one-time fee of $500. All students should contact their Academic Advisor, Financial Aid Counselor and International Student Advisor (if applicable) to discuss any implications to changing programs, prior to submitting this request. Students enrolled in an undergraduate program (e.g., Associate in Applied Science) wishing to transfer to another undergraduate program (e.g., Bachelor of Fine Arts) must go through the Change of Academic Program process. This process includes completing a Change of Program application form and submitting a portfolio. Portfolio requirements will be provided once an application form is submitted. The application, portfolio, and a copy of the student’s NYSID transcript (obtained by the Office of Admissions) will be reviewed. Students who change into a new degree program normally do not acquire a certificate or degree from a lower-level program as part of their new program (For example, BFA students are not automatically awarded an Associate's degree or a Basic Interior Design certificate). A student who wishes to receive the certificate or degree in their current program before moving to a higher-level program is welcome to do so as long as the student is in the final semester of their current degree and will complete the total number of credits within the semester prior to when the new degree program takes effect. To receive the certificate or degree of the current program, the student must submit a complete Graduation Candidacy and Diploma form with the Registrar’s Office before completing the Change of Program form. The certificate or degree of the lower-level program will not be granted until after the student has moved to a higher-level program. Additionally, students changing programs enter the new program under the Academic Catalog "year" in which the change will go into effect. COP students must complete all the requirements of the relevant Catalog year in which they enter the new program. Only upon acceptance into the desired program may students register for courses in that program. If you have any questions about your advising requirements, please ask your academic advisor. For all other questions, contact the Admissions Office before submitting this form.

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International (F-1) students will need to provide updated funding in order to receive an updated I-20 form reflecting your new program. Contact NYSID's international student services advisor with any questions. Re-Admission Matriculated students (those previously accepted into a program and have completed courses) who leave NYSID for more than one year or who have not completed their current program within 10 years are required to apply for readmission. Students who have attended other schools during an absence from NYSID must have official transcripts sent directly to the Office of Admissions. A published course description, syllabus, and samples of work generated in the course(s) may be requested for the course(s) to be considered for transfer credit. Readmitted students are required to satisfy all degree requirements current at the time of readmission as described in the Academic Catalog, regardless of when they were originally admitted. Previous NYSID students who are readmitted will have their credits reevaluated because graduation requirements could have changed. If a student requests to be considered for a program different from the program into which they were originally admitted, a portfolio or other materials may be required for the application to be reviewed. Students who have been dismissed from the college due to lack of academic progress may not apply for readmission to the college to any program.

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OFFICE OF ACADEMIC AFFAIRS The mission of the Office of Academic Affairs is to create interior design professionals through a comprehensive, focused and rigorous curriculum, based on a core knowledge of the field, including a study of aesthetics, technology, the interaction of people and their environments, design history, and current professional practice and design thinking. The Office of Academic Affairs, including the offices of the Vice President for Academic Affairs/Dean of the College, is located on the third floor of the 69th Street building. Students are always welcome, and appointments can be made with the dean by calling ext. 304, or emailing [email protected] The Office of Academic Affairs convenes an Academic Council approximately six times per year. The Academic Council is a standing committee of the College that addresses matters related to the academic affairs of the College such as curriculum, and advises the Vice President for Academic Affairs/Dean. Along with faculty and administrative members, designated members of the student associations may serve as ad hoc members of the committee. Administrative faculty, faculty members-at-large, and the director of the library are members of the Academic Council. Responsibilities of the Office of Academic Affairs: •

All Academic Programs

Undergraduate certificate & degree programs

Graduate programs

Online Learning

Continuing Education (Institute for Continuing and Professional Studies)

Pre-College programs

Faculty

The Library

Office of the Registrar

Academic Advising

Disability Services

Academic Tutoring

Writing and Communications Center

Academic Computing

Career and Internship Services

Student Design Scholarship Competitions & Opportunities

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The academic programs offered at the New York School of Interior Design include the following: •

Basic Interior Design Certificate (BID, BIDD/Online Learning)

Associate in Applied Science (AAS, AASD/Online Learning) in Interior Design

Bachelor of Fine Arts (BFA, BFAD/Online Learning) in Interior Design

Master of Fine Arts in Interior Design, professional level (MFA1)

Master of Fine Arts in Interior Design, post–professional level (MFA2)

Master of Professional Studies in Sustainable Interior Environments (MPSS), Lighting Design (MPSL), and Healthcare Interior Design (MPSH)

MPSL online

MPSS online

Online Learning Many courses and programs are offered in an online learning format at NYSID, at the non-credit, undergraduate, and graduate levels. Courses may be held as self-paced (asynchronous), or in real-time (synchronous). The individual classes and Basic Interior Design certificate are self-paced, although progress is required in sync with the semester schedule of classes. A self-paced course is defined as a class in which a student can sign in whenever it is convenient, to watch pre-recorded lectures and get weekly assignments. Weekly log-in participation is required. A course held online, in real-time is one in which the onsite students and distance learners join their instructor and classmates via videoconferencing for lectures and discussions at the same time, as the class session is being offered. Academic policies are consistently maintained across learning platforms, although policies such as attendance are modified appropriately. Institute for Continuing and Professional Studies (ICPS) The Institute for Continuing and Professional Studies offers courses for professionals interested in learning new skills or advancing their knowledge, and at an introductory level for those who would like to take a course to see if interior design is the right career for them. Non-matriculated students may take courses that bear academic credit through the ICPS, and can register at nysid.edu. The academic credits may later be applicable to a degree program. Accreditation Chartered by the Board of Regents of the University of the State of New York in 1924, NYSID is authorized by the Board of Regents to confer the Basic Interior Design certificate and Basic Interior Design Online certificate (BID/BIDD), and the degrees of Associate in Applied Science in Interior Design (AAS, AASD), Bachelor of Fine Arts in Interior Design (BFA, BFAD), Bachelor of Arts in the History of the Interior and the Decorative Arts (BA) (not offered at this time), Master of Fine Arts in Interior Design (MFA1 and MFA2), Master of Professional Studies in Sustainable Interior Environments (MPSS/ MPSSD), Master of Professional Studies in Interior Lighting Design (MPSL), and Master of Professional Studies in Healthcare Interior Design (MPSH/MPSHD). New York School of Interior Design is accredited by the Middle States Commission on Higher Education, 3624 Market Street, Philadelphia, PA 19104, (267) 284-5000. Accreditation is a status of affiliation with a

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regional accrediting commission that indicates that an institution has provided evidence of sound planning, has the resources to implement the plans, and has proven that it maintains an on-going culture of assessment. Consumer Information Information about NYSID’s enrollment data, retention rates, graduation rates, and more can be found at nysid.edu/consumerinfo.

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ACADEMIC POLICIES Attendance During COVID, any student who suspects that they may have been exposed to the virus, is feeling ill, or must self-quarantine for any reason, may attend an onsite class via Zoom. Students in onsite courses are limited in the fall 2020 semester to three "Zoom" attendances. NYSID creates professional interior designers; punctuality and attendance are considered very important and contribute to a professional classroom atmosphere. Regular and punctual attendance at all classes is mandatory. Attendance and punctuality are taken by instructors at every class session and entered into the NYSID Portal or Canvas course page. Attendance is regularly monitored by the registrar, the financial aid office, and the international student services specialist. No absences are considered “excused” at NYSID; each absence, regardless of reason, will apply toward the maximum permitted before failure of a course. The maximum number of absences in a semester is equal to 20% of the total number of class sessions: for instance, three absences are the maximum number in a course which meets once per week for the 15-week semester; six absences for a course that meets twice per week for 15 weeks; one absence for a six-session mini-course. Absences will affect the grade, regardless, except in instances of absences due to religious observance. Acceptance of any absences over the 20% maximum is at the discretion of the instructor. For asynchronous online courses, attendance is noted as logging into each class module or session, and participating in the Discussion Forum in a timely and substantive manner as stated in the course syllabus. For synchronous online courses, a student is marked "Present" if they are present in the class session for the entire time, and actively interact with the other members of the class. Students are responsible for making up all work missed due to an absence. If a student misses a class due to illness or personal emergency, the student should notify the instructor of the circumstances as soon as possible via Canvas email, and preferably before the class begins, or by using the contact information provided at the first class session. It is highly recommended that a student notify his academic advisor, as well, in case of an emergency or unexpected absence. A student is not excused from any class because it conflicts with employment outside of school or for doctors’ appointments, and such conflicts should be avoided. Absences due to illness or personal emergencies are not excused and remain part of the student’s attendance record for the course. Excessive Absences Excessive absences are defined as absences equaling more than one of the sessions of a class in a given semester. Punctuality is valued at NYSID as part of professionalism. Students are required to arrive at their classes on time. “Lateness” is defined as any arrival after the beginning of the class session. A “lateness” will also be entered if the student leaves the class session prior to its end without permission of the instructor. Students are required to attend classes for the entire time period and remain in the classroom unless explicitly given permission by the instructor to work elsewhere. Students who are absent from the classroom without permission of the instructor during class time may be counted either as absent or late. Three instances of lateness are recorded as one absence. No refunds will be made to

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students who receive a failing grade due to excessive absence. Instructors will issue an Academic Warning Notice to students for excessive absences from class. Attendance, preparedness, and participation are required at all pin-ups, process critiques, final presentations, and field trips. Students must be present for the entire time of a class presentation, for the presentations of their classmates, unless given specific permission by the instructor to leave the room or during breaks. Students must arrive on time for presentations and critiques, and field trips, and must be present for the entire time. Printing of projects should be done in advance, and in no case are considered an excuse for missing any part of any presentation. Students may be excused from review sessions and presentations only in the case of an unanticipated emergency, such as a serious accident, illness, or family event, which must be documented or else a grade of zero will be entered and a student will be in danger of academic probation. Documentation must be provided to the academic advisor (not to the instructor), who will let the instructor(s) know that the student has a valid reason for missing a presentation. Students should refer to course syllabi for policies regarding such absences. If a student is absent from a scheduled presentation of a final course project without evidence of a documented emergency, the student will receive an F for the final project. Unless a valid excuse with documentation is provided to the student’s academic advisor, an instructor is not obligated to give a student a critique of work that is not presented during the final review session. If the student has a valid excuse, the instructor may allow the student to present the project at another time, but is not obligated to do so. Anticipated Absences In the situation in which a student knows in advance that he/she will be missing one or more class sessions, the student is responsible for notifying the instructor in the first week of the semester of the schedule of anticipated absences. The student is also responsible for all class work due on the day of an anticipated absence and for making alternative arrangements with the instructor for submittal of work due, generally in advance of the “due date” listed on the course schedule. Instructors are not obligated to offer makeup exams, alternate exam dates, or to reschedule a project presentation to a student who will be missing class due to an anticipated absence, although they may be willing to do so. Absence due to Religious Observance NYSID recognizes and respects the diversity of its students and their respective religious obligations and practices and offers many courses in a variety of times and days of the week. However, it is the student’s responsibility in registering for a course to verify that the schedule selected will allow the student to meet NYSID’s course attendance requirements. It is the student’s responsibility to notify instructors in advance of anticipated absences in writing, and to follow through in making up or submitting work. Students who are absent due to religious observance must give notice of anticipated absences to the instructor in the first class session and must complete all coursework as agreed upon by the instructor and student. Absences due to religious observance are not considered “excused” and do contribute to the total number of absences a student accumulates for a course. However, absences due to religious observance are not treated the same as other absences: instructors are advised in the Faculty Handbook that they may not penalize the grades of students who must miss class due to religious observance. Days on which a student is absent for religious observance are simply left blank and not noted in any way in Canvas, and result in no penalty for absence in the final grade calculation. Questions or concerns about this policy are taken seriously and should be directed to the VP for Academic Affairs/Dean or the Office of Academic Affairs.

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Registration and Enrollment Full-Time/Part-Time Status In order to be classified as having full-time status at NYSID, students must be registered for a minimum of 12 credits in a semester. Students who register for fewer than 12 credits, or who drop to fewer than 12 credits during the refund period, are classified as part-time students. All students in the MFA programs are full-time students. Matriculation Time Limitation Students must graduate from NYSID within 10 years of their date of matriculation into their most recent program. If they have not completed the requirements for graduation within 10 years, they will be dismissed from the College for lack of academic progress, or may be given the opportunity to reapply. If reapplication does not occur within 30 days of the end of their matriculated period, the student will be academically dismissed. Students who elect to take a Leave of Absence must submit the form in a timely manner. International students must contact the international student advisor immediately. All rules governing the time allowed for a leave of absence will apply. In special circumstances, exceptions may be made with the permission of the VP for academic affairs/dean.

Academic Sequence & Progress Prerequisites It is the sole responsibility of the student to ensure that all courses are taken in the sequence outlined in the Academic Catalog of the year in which they matriculated into their degree program. In no case will a student be allowed to register for a course without having successfully completed the required prerequisite. It is solely the student’s responsibility to ensure that a course designated as a “corequisite” is taken prior to or during the same semester. Students who register for courses out of sequence are subject to being withdrawn from the course at any time during the semester and will be reimbursed for the course according to the College’s published refund policy. Add/Drop: Change of Registered Courses A student who wishes to change classes or switch course sections (Add/Drop) before or at the beginning of a course may drop or add using the NYSID Portal until the Add/ Drop period is over; thereafter, the student can drop a course until the end of the Drop period (last day for a refund) by completing the Add/Drop form available on the NYSID Portal or from the Office of the Registrar and returning it, signed by the student’s academic advisor, to the Office of the Registrar. Refunds are calculated according to the date recorded as receipt of the Add/ Drop form in the Office of the Registrar and the current refund schedule. Telephone or email notification is not acceptable. All fees are nontransferable. Tuition deposits and registration/technology fees are nonrefundable except in the case that a program is cancelled. The refund schedule is published in the bulletin for each semester or session, and online. Refunds resulting from dropping a course during the late registration period will not be processed until after the Add/Drop period is over. Courses which have been dropped during the Add/Drop period do not appear on a student’s transcript.

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Financial aid recipients are subject to a special refund policy, which is available in the financial aid office for review. This may result in some financial aid being returned and monies owed to NYSID. For one-credit mini-courses and all continuing education courses taken through the NYSID Institute for Continuing and Professional Studies (ICPS), refunds must be requested in writing no later than one week prior to the first session or no refund is possible. Course Withdrawals Students may withdraw voluntarily from classes in which they are enrolled up to the voluntary withdrawal deadline (within approximately the first half of the semester or summer session, as identified in the published Academic Calendar). Students must officially withdraw from a class by submitting a completed and signed Add/Drop form to the Office of the Registrar; if they do not officially withdraw, then a final grade of F will be issued by the instructor. The deadline for voluntary withdrawal is published in the Academic Calendar for each term. Students who withdraw from a course due to medical reasons must provide a doctor’s note to their academic advisor prior to registering for the next semester authorizing the student to resume studies. Courses from which a student has officially withdrawn are noted on the student’s transcript with a “W” or “WA.” If a previously dropped course is successfully retaken for a grade, the “W” or “WA” remains on the transcript and has no effect on the GPA. Repeated Courses After completion of a repeated course, the initial grade is recorded as “R” (Repeat), and only the grade earned by retaking the course is averaged into the GPA. In most cases, financial aid cannot be used to cover the expense of repeating a course; it is the student’s responsibility to verify their status with the financial aid office. Auditing a Course for No Credit Matriculated students may desire to audit certain lecture courses for no credit with the permission of an academic advisor. Students auditing a course will pay the regular tuition and receive the designation AUD on their transcript if they attend 80% of the scheduled classes. Students auditing a course do not participate in any quizzes, exams, papers, or projects and may not participate in in-class discussions. The decision to audit a course must be made before registration, and with the assistance and permission of the academic advisor. Studio courses may not be audited, with the exception of digital drawing courses. Withdrawal from the College If a student finds it necessary to withdraw from the College, the student is required to notify the registrar and the academic advisor at once in writing, providing a brief explanation. The student must withdraw from any current courses by dropping the courses using the NYSID Portal or providing a signed Add/Drop form to the Office of the Registrar. Refunds will not be made if courses are not dropped appropriately; grades of F entered due to withdrawal but not dropping cannot be changed to a W if made after the last day to withdraw. Students are then referred to the financial aid administrator and the international student advisor, if applicable, for an exit interview. All international students must notify the international student advisor immediately if they are withdrawing from the College. Students who withdraw from classes or from the College for medical reasons must provide a note from a doctor to their academic advisor certifying their readiness to resume classes before they will be allowed to return their studies. Notes are confidential and should be given to the student’s academic advisor.

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Students who withdraw from the College must apply for readmission to a program if they wish to rematriculate, however re-admittance is not guaranteed. Leave of Absence Part time and full-time students are all encouraged to maintain continuous enrollment in order to progress academically. Students who must discontinue their studies at the College for one to three semesters due to medical or family reasons may, upon their return, continue in their program as listed in the Academic Catalog of the term in which they began only if they have submitted the Request for Leave of Absence form, available from the Office of the Registrar, to their advisor for approval, along with documentation or a letter of explanation. The academic advisor will review and submit the form to the Office of the Registrar. Students with an approved Leave of Absence will be permitted to continue their studies without being required to apply for readmission to the College. For a student with an approved Leave of Absence, absence from the College for more than three semesters will require formal application for readmission. Students who discontinue their studies without filing a written Request for Leave of Absence may be absent for a maximum period of one year. Absence from the College without an approved Leave of Absence for more than one year will require formal application for readmission. All students who apply for admission or readmission are re-admitted return under the policies and requirements of the Academic Catalog in effect at the time of their start date which may differ from previous academic years. Independent Study A student who has completed at least 60 credits in the BA, BFA, or MFA programs may petition to create an individual independent study program with a faculty member under the following conditions only: •

The student has a cumulative GPA of 3.0 or higher for undergraduate programs and 3.3 or higher for graduate programs.

Prior to registering, the student presents a written proposal, outlining the learning objectives (content, scope, and reason for the study), plan of study, and schedule for the independent study along with the number of credits to be taken, first to the instructor for signed approval and then to the VP for Academic Affairs/Dean for signed approval prior to registration. Students should identify a faculty member or mentor with whom they will work during the independent study. Such mentors will be compensated by the College.

A student may earn no more than six credits in independent study toward the degree.

Residency Requirements, and Transfer Credit Process, and Placement Tests The academic advisors evaluate students’ official records for applicable transfer credit. The Office of Academic Affairs also administers placement tests for math and English skill levels. Transfer Credit NYSID accepts transfer credits into its undergraduate programs for liberal arts and professional courses taken at other accredited colleges and universities. An accredited institution is one that is accredited by

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an accrediting body recognized by the U.S. Department of Education. These courses must have been taken for credit and awarded a grade of C or better for liberal arts courses and B or better for professional courses (in some cases P or S may be accepted, if noted in writing as the equivalent of an acceptable letter grade). Life experience, precollege courses taken at another institution, or remedial courses, or courses not taken for credit or a grade are not accepted for transfer credit. With prior approval of an academic advisor, remedial courses in math and English taken at another accredited college or university may fulfill prerequisites equal to the NYSID placement tests required for 171 Basic Mathematics or 150 English Composition I. A student’s academic advisor will evaluate evidence of skill in technical or support courses and determine if a required course may be waived. The College may accept some liberal arts credit earned through College-Level Examination Program (CLEP) proficiency examinations. Advanced Placement test scores of 3 or better in subject tests may be applicable as transfer credit; an official AP transcript must be requested from the College Board and sent directly to the academic advisor. Transfer credits from high school level International Baccalaureate courses will be accepted if they are HL courses with an earned grade of 4, 5, or 6; a scanned copy of the diploma or other official IB documentation must be submitted. Regardless of professional or life experience, students must earn the number of credits required by their program of study. Official transcripts and catalog course descriptions must be submitted to a student’s academic advisor, who will determine whether credits may transfer. A portfolio containing representative work from classes taken at other institutions may be requested of the applicant. Final approval of transfer credit is made by the academic advisor. NYSID residency requirements for each program may in no case be waived. Courses taken in graduate programs, other than NYSID’s may not be applied as transfer credit to any undergraduate program. For instance, graduate level English, Math or other liberal arts courses/credits will not satisfy the related undergraduate level program. Students must either take the NYSID placement tests and place out of 150 English Composition I or 171 Basic Math; or, they may demonstrate their command of these subjects (or others) by successfully taking the relevant CLEP test. Transfer credits cannot be formally applied until all official documents are received and the student has been accepted into a program. Every time that a student applies to a new program, their file is reevaluated for applicable transfer credits. It is the responsibility of students to ensure that all applicable transfer credits have been applied by periodically viewing their academic information via the NYSID portal under Course history in the Advising Tab. They may consult with their academic advisor concerning the evaluation of transfer credit. Students already matriculated in a NYSID program must receive written permission from an academic advisor before taking courses at another college in anticipation of earning transfer credits to be applied to his or her NYSID record. These courses must meet NYSID's minimum grade requirement to be eligible for transfer credit. Under extraordinary circumstances, a student may decide to transfer from the MFA-1 to an undergraduate program. In this case, it is possible that some MFA-1 courses, but not all, may satisfy undergraduate degree requirements. In order for an MFA-1 course to satisfy an undergraduate course requirement, the student must have earned a grade of C or better in lecture courses and B or better in studio and professional courses. Only co-numbered courses are eligible for transfer. NOTE: Students who had been previously approved for transfer credits during Spring 2018, to move from the MFA1 program to an undergraduate program are

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not bound by this policy. A maximum of 11 graduate credits may transfer towards the BID and 30 NYSID graduate credits may transfer towards the AAS or BFA degree requirements. Once a student has made a change of program from the graduate level to an undergraduate level program, they may not be readmitted to their original graduate program at NYSID. Of the 90 credits required for the first professional MFA-1, up to 30 credits may be transfer credits from graduate course work taken at another institution or from related undergraduate course work taken at NYSID. The course from an accredited institution must have been taken for academic credit and the student must have earned a grade of B or better. Application of transfer credits in no way changes the requirement for full time enrollment or payment of the flat semester tuition. Official transcripts and catalog course descriptions must be submitted to the student’s academic advisor, who will determine whether credits may transfer, and to what courses they may apply. No transfer credits are awarded for 600 level courses. Placement Tests Prior to registering for math or English all students are required to take the appropriate NYSID placement test. Students may take a math or English placement test only once. Contact the Office of Academic Affairs or refer to the NYSID Portal to obtain instructions for accessing NYSID’s online placement tests. All placement tests are administered online through ProctorU, for which students will pay a fee directly to ProctorU. Mathematics: All students in the AAS, BA and BFA degree programs are required to demonstrate proficiency in fundamental mathematical skills including basic arithmetic, algebra, geometry, and trigonometry. Proficiency may be demonstrated by transferring 2 credits of college-level mathematics with a minimum grade of C and as approved by an academic advisor, or by a minimum score of 3 on the AP calculus exam. All other students must take the NYSID math placement test. Placement testing will result in one of the following: •

The student demonstrates sufficient proficiency to meet the NYSID math requirement. The math requirement is considered satisfied, and the student must take two credits of free electives to satisfy the degree credit requirements.

The student demonstrates sufficient basic mathematical skills to register for 171 Basic Mathematics.

The student does not demonstrate sufficient basic mathematical skills to register for 171 Basic Mathematics and is required to complete a two-semester-hour noncredit remedial or developmental course in basic mathematics, which may be taken at a regionally accredited college.

English: All students in the BA, BFA, AAS degree programs and the Basic Interior Design certificate program are required to demonstrate proficiency in writing grammatically correct prose. Students in the degree programs are additionally required to demonstrate proficiency in writing a well-planned research paper. All or part of the NYSID English requirements may be met by transferring appropriate collegelevel credits with a minimum grade of C as approved by an academic advisor, by a minimum score of 3 on an AP English exam, or by passing the College-Level Examination Program (CLEP) test. After review of such credits, students who still need to satisfy English Composition I (150) must take the NYSID English placement test. Placement testing does not reduce the number of credits in English composition or literature required by the curriculum of a particular program. Placement testing will result in one of the following:

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The student demonstrates sufficient proficiency to place out of 150 English Composition I and into 160 English Composition II. AAS, BA and BFA students are required to complete the three remaining credits in advanced English composition or literature courses that are designated as satisfying the College writing requirement. The student demonstrates sufficient basic writing skills to register for 150 English Composition I or 151 English Composition I/ ESL (English as a Second Language). The student does not demonstrate sufficient basic writing skills to register for 150 English Composition I or 151 English Composition I/ESL and is required to complete a three-semester-hour noncredit remedial or developmental course in grammar and writing, which must be taken before the student is permitted to take 150 or 151, and which may be taken at NYSID or any accredited college.

Transcripts Student records are confidential and are the property of the College. An official transcript of a student’s record is issued by the Office of the Registrar only upon receipt of the student’s written request and authorization and payment of a fee. Unofficial transcripts are available to the student on the NYSID Portal for viewing and printing at no cost. To have an official copy of a NYSID transcript mailed to another school or agency, a student must either fill out a Transcript Request form, which is available in the Office of the Registrar, on the NYSID Portal, and on the NYSID website, or write to NYSID indicating either their NYSID student ID number or Social Security number, the name attended under, the last date of attendance, and where the transcript is to be sent. Telephone requests will not be accepted. Partial transcripts cannot be issued. Each transcript includes the student’s complete academic record from NYSID. Requests for transcripts are fulfilled as soon as possible. Please allow three to seven business days for processing. Transcripts cannot be released until all outstanding accounts to NYSID are paid and all holds have been removed. When official transcripts are sent to colleges, universities, state or federal agencies, etc., they bear the NYSID seal. Unofficial transcripts, for a student’s personal use, do not bear the seal. Copies of transcripts from other schools are part of a student’s file and may not be released or copied. If a student wants a copy of his or her transcript from another school, it must be requested directly from that school by the student.

Minimum Residency Of the 132 credits required for the BFA degree, a minimum of 66 credits must be taken at NYSID of which 60 credits must be in professional/design history courses. The residency requirement includes, but is not limited to, courses 328 Professional Practice II, 334 Residential Design III, 386 Contract Design II, 486 Contract Design III, and 487 Thesis. Courses are to be taken in the proper sequence. The last 26 credits prior to receiving the BFA degree must be taken at NYSID. Of the 66 credits required for an AAS degree, a minimum of 36 credits must be taken at NYSID; the last 16 credits prior to receiving an AAS degree must be taken at NYSID. The residency requirement includes, but is not limited to, 234 Residential Design II and 286 Contract Design I.

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Of the 24 credits required for the Basic Interior Design certificate, 18 must be taken at NYSID. The last 12 credits prior to receiving the certificate must be completed at NYSID. Minimum residency for the MFA-1 is 60 credits. All 60 credits of the MFA-2, and 30 credits of the MPS programs must be taken at NYSID. The transfer credit and residency requirement apply to onsite and online programs.

Internships for Credit The NYSID internship courses offer variable elective academic credit for college-monitored work experience. Internships for credit are available to students matriculated in the AAS, BFA, and Masters degree programs. Internship experiences are designed to help students build on skills already learned in the classroom and to acquire new ones. Students have an opportunity to integrate theory and practice and in so doing gain professional experience. Students are also able to make valuable contacts and explore opportunities for permanent employment. An internship for credit can be used to fulfill required professional electives and can be completed in spring, summer or fall terms. Students may work with their academic advisor and career services and internship coordinator prior to registration to identify a suitable placement. A detailed learning contract is developed by the student and advisor in collaboration with the placement mentor. The student keeps a journal of the experience, documenting the fulfillment of the learning contract objectives. The placement mentor signs off on the journal and submits an evaluation of the student midway and at the conclusion of the placement. The student is assigned a grade of P or F by the VP for Academic Affairs/Dean. International Students: F1 international students must follow all rules, guidelines, and policies of the college and the U.S. government Department of Homeland Security, and may not work without prior authorization from the NYSID International Student Services Specialist and from their academic advisor. If you are an international student considering taking these courses, you should speak with the International Student Services Specialist prior to enrolling in the course to make sure you are eligible. Failure to obtain work authorization prior to the start of an internship/job (paid or unpaid) is a serious violation of F-1 student status. Courses Undergraduate Programs: (291) Intro to Professional Experience allows undergraduate students to gain introductory practical experience working as an intern in a professional design office. This experience is directly applicable to the study of interior design. Students must have completed 24 credits at the New York School of Interior Design to enroll in this course and be matriculated in the AAS or BFA. This course may be taken three times. Credits (1): 1 Credit / 80 hours (maximum 20 hours/week) of contact time at the internship placement site

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Sours: https://issuu.com/nysid/docs/nysidstudenthdbk_20_21
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MFA Thesis & MPS Studio Projects Exhibition

Filtering by: Thesis Exhibitions 2019

MFA Thesis & MPS Studio Projects Exhibition

This exhibition features the work of NYSID MFA and MPS candidates who have completed their thesis projects between fall 2018 - spring 2019. Graduating student projects are hypothetical designs based on the adaptive reuse of existing buildings.

Exhibition is open to the public, reservation is required. Please email [email protected] to reserve a time to visit the exhibition. Gallery hours are Monday-Thursday, 9am-5pm.

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BFA Thesis Exhibition

This exhibition features the work of NYSID BFA candidates who have completed their thesis projects between fall 2018 - spring 2019. Graduating student projects are hypothetical designs based on the adaptive reuse of existing buildings.

Paint generously sponsored by Farrow & Ball.

Exhibition is open to the public, no reservation is required. Gallery hours are Monday-Thursday, 9am-5pm.

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Sours: https://nysid.squarespace.com/exhibitions?category=Thesis+Exhibitions+2019
NYSID 2021 COMMENCEMENT

The guy who pulled off the girl's panties and skirt, grabbing the girl's ass with both hands, sat her straight with a girl's pussy on his mouth. Oh, what an unusual sensation it turned out to be. The girl's pussy not at all covered with hairs, and with not fully formed sexual lips, amazed with its smoothness. He seemed to lick the glass surface, it was so smooth.

The skin of her pussy and inner thighs was velvety and incredibly pleasant to the tongue.

Calendar nysid

Just sleeping with your loved one. A week later everything happened again, we stayed, I stayed with him, after a shower we went to bed. I don't know what came over me. I really wanted him. HIS - my beloved Vlad.

D'SIGN - DIY Schedule Calendar

He has such an item there. I rubbed my grandmother through and through. After these dances I go to the bent ones. An, it doesn't matter. As Lyuska's weeks begin, so I count the days when my shift.

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Left side, was sticking up. Glued. A thought flashed through my mind.



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